652 results match your criteria Advances in parasitology[Journal]


Drug Combinations Against Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections.

Adv Parasitol 2019 7;103:91-115. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

The soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Trichuris trichiura are common in areas with warm and moist climates with little access to adequate water, sanitation, and hygiene affecting the poorest populations. The current control strategy of the World Health Organization is preventive chemotherapy (PC), i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.08.002DOI Listing
September 2018
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Challenges and Lessons From Conducting A Paediatric Clinical Trial in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of the Praziquantel Oral Dispersible Tablets Phase II Study in Côte d'Ivoire.

Adv Parasitol 2019 22;103:75-89. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Ares Trading S.A., Switzerland, an affiliate of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.

The importance of implementing paediatric clinical trials for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in compliance with the Good Clinical Practices of the International Conference of Harmonisation (ICH-GCP) and other applicable regulatory and ethics guidelines is increasingly being recognised as an essential pathway to provide safe and effective medicines for millions of untreated children living in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This paper describes the learnings and challenges faced by the Pediatric Praziquantel Consortium team during the implementation of an industry-sponsored Phase II clinical study in pre-school-aged children infected with schistosomiasis, conducted in remote rural settings in Côte d'Ivoire. The importance of close interactions with the ethics committee, the regulatory and administrative authorities and the rural communities are highlighted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.09.002DOI Listing
October 2018

Is Opisthorchis viverrini Emerging in Cambodia?

Adv Parasitol 2019 6;103:31-73. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Opisthorchis viverrini infection is widely prevalent in Southeast Asia. In Cambodia information on this helminth infection is scare. Recent reports suggest that O. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2019.02.002DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Mobile Phone Devices and Handheld Microscopes as Diagnostic Platforms for Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) in Low-Resource Settings: A Systematic Review, Historical Perspective and Future Outlook.

Adv Parasitol 2019 22;103:151-173. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.

The accurate, rapid, and cost-effective diagnosis of malaria and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in low-resource settings may benefit by significant technological advances in handheld and mobile phone microscopy. We systematically review the available literature in this field and discuss the future directions in which these technologies may be applied. English-language studies from the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Sciences were searched through April 2018 for observational and interventional studies reporting diagnostic characteristics of handheld and mobile phone microscopy devices as compared to field-established gold standard reference tests. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.09.001DOI Listing
October 2018

Community and Drug Distributor Perceptions and Experiences of Mass Drug Administration for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis: A Rapid Review of Qualitative Research.

Adv Parasitol 2019 16;103:117-149. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Study Objectives: This article presents findings from a rapid review of qualitative research conducted to inform decision makers about community and drug distributor perceptions and experiences of mass drug administration campaigns for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis. We focused on questions related to acceptability of the mass drug administration campaigns within these groups and their thoughts around the feasibility of planning and carrying out the campaigns.

Methods: We carried out a systematic search in five databases to identify potential studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.09.003DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Helminthiasis Epidemiology and Control: Scoring Successes and Meeting the Remaining Challenges.

Authors:
Charles H King

Adv Parasitol 2019 31;103:11-30. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Center for Global Health and Diseases, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training on Schistosomiasis Elimination, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, United States; Schistosomiasis Consortium for Operational Research and Evaluation (SCORE), University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States. Electronic address:

Parasitic helminth infections remain a significant challenge to global health. These are highly prevalent diseases, affecting over 1 billion persons worldwide. Their prevalence is closely linked to the presence of severe poverty and its associated sub-standard housing and sanitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.08.001DOI Listing
August 2018
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The Discovery of Helminth Life Cycles.

Authors:
Hanspeter Marti

Adv Parasitol 2019 28;103:1-10. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

The origin of worms, which were occasionally excreted by some individuals, has left humans wondering for centuries. The story of the gradual discovery of the life cycles of the parasitic helminths is a fascinating one, peppered with misconceptions, misguided by dogmas of the church and enlightened by brave men, who did not recant when they were attacked by the opinion leaders of their time. This article will try to pinpoint some of the key discoveries which turned out to be milestones for the elucidation of the secret life of helminths. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2019.02.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Update on Pathogenesis of Opisthorchiasis and Cholangiocarcinoma.

Adv Parasitol 2018 22;102:97-113. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, Research Center for Neglected Diseases of Poverty, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University, Washington DC, United States.

Infection with the food-borne liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini causes cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Whereas the cause of CCA in the West remains obscure, the principal risk factor in Thailand is opisthorchiasis. Here, we review recent findings on the pathogenesis of opisthorchiasis and CCA focusing on helminth molecules/toxic metabolites, host-parasite interaction, endocytosis, immunopathology/inflammatory responses, free radical production, molecular genetic alterations, and multifactorial including coinfections driving to CCA development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.10.001DOI Listing
October 2018
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Immune Response to Opisthorchis viverrini Infection and Its Role in Pathology.

Adv Parasitol 2018 10;102:73-95. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

School of Public Health and Social Work, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Human liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini is a major public health problem in Mekong countries such as Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Myanmar with over 10 million infected through consumption of fish containing infective metacercariae. With no tissue migration phase and living entirely within the larger secondary (intrahepatic) bile ducts, liver flukes are only exposed to a biliary mucosal immune response, while their excretory and secretory products also stimulate chronic inflammation of biliary epithelium. Neither mucosal nor tissue immune responses appear to cause parasite death or protect against newly established flukes, as evidenced by the persistence of infection for decades in the body and rapid reinfection following treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.08.003DOI Listing
September 2018
8 Reads

Opisthorchis viverrini Proteome and Host-Parasite Interactions.

Adv Parasitol 2018 18;102:45-72. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

Centre for Biodiscovery and Molecular Development of Therapeutics, Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD, Australia.

The omics technologies have improved our understanding of the molecular events that underpin host-parasite interactions and the pathogenesis of parasitic diseases. In the last decade, proteomics and genomics in particular have been used to characterize the surface and secreted products of the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini and revealed important roles for proteins at the host-parasite interface to ensure that the flukes can migrate, feed and reproduce in a hostile environment. This review summarizes the advances made in this area, primarily focusing on discoveries enabled by the publication of the fluke secreted proteomes over the last decade. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.06.002DOI Listing
July 2018
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RNA Interference as an Approach to Functional Genomics Genetic Manipulation of Opisthorchis viverrini.

Adv Parasitol 2018 18;102:25-43. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

Tropical Disease Research Center, Tropical Medicine Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

The availability of genome and transcriptome data of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini provides the foundation for exploration of gene function and its effect on host-parasite interactions and pathogenesis of O. viverrini-associated bile duct cancer. Functional genomics approaches address the function of DNA at levels of the gene, RNA transcript and protein product using informative manipulations of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, microbiome and metabolome. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0065308X183004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.06.001DOI Listing
July 2018
13 Reads

The Socioeconomic Burden of Cholangiocarcinoma Associated With Opisthorchis viverrini Sensu Lato Infection in Northeast Thailand: A Preliminary Analysis.

Adv Parasitol 2018 18;102:141-163. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

Cholangiocarcinoma Screening and Care Program (CASCAP), Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; Department of Ecology and Parasitology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany.

The northeast of Thailand, which is the poorest region of the country, has the highest incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) worldwide. This is associated with infection with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini. Although an estimated 20,000 people die every year of this disease, the socioeconomic impact of this mortality on the victims' family and the community in which he or she lived remains unknown. Read More

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July 2018
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Integrative EcoHealth/One Health Approach for Sustainable Liver Fluke Control: The Lawa Model.

Adv Parasitol 2018 20;102:115-139. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Control of Opisthorchiasis (Southeast Asian liver fluke disease), Tropical Disease Research Center, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

The Lawa model is a successful integrative and sustainable means of controlling opisthorchiasis in Thailand. The model integrates the EcoHealth and One Health holistic approaches with systems thinking to target the interruption of Opisthorchis viverrini transmission. Using the six principles of EcoHealth and emphasizing the three domains of One Health (human-animal-ecosystem), the program targets each step of the parasite life cycle, thus maximizing the chances of interrupting the life cycle of the parasite. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.07.002DOI Listing
August 2018
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Opisthorchiasis and the Microbiome.

Adv Parasitol 2018 17;102:1-23. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Tropical Medicine, and Research Center for Neglected Diseases of Poverty, School of Medicine & Health Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, DC, United States.

The liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini, O. felineus, and Clonorchis sinensis are closely related fish-borne trematodes endemic in East Asia, Eurasia, and Siberia. Following ingestion, the parasites locate to the biliary tree, where chronic infection frequently leads to cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.07.001DOI Listing
August 2018
16 Reads

Social Influence in Liver Fluke Transmission: Application of Social Network Analysis of Food Sharing in Thai Isaan Culture.

Adv Parasitol 2018 31;101:97-124. Epub 2018 May 31.

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Control of Opisthorchiasis (Southeast Asian Liver Fluke Disease)/Tropical Disease Research Center (TDRC), Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

In northeastern Thai (Isaan) culture traditional raw fish dishes and raw fish-eating habits are common. Eating and sharing meals together among the community's members, especially relatives and neighbours, are a common practice in both daily life and social gathering events. Fish are a significant protein source and are associated with variety of traditional recipes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.05.004DOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

Reservoir Animals and Their Roles in Transmission of Opisthorchis viverrini.

Adv Parasitol 2018 29;101:69-95. Epub 2018 May 29.

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

Although any fish-eating mammals could be potential definitive hosts of Opisthorchis viverrini, only a few, especially cats and dogs, are actually known reservoir hosts for this parasite. Both animals usually get infected via consuming raw or undercooked contaminated fish, fish dishes or food remains from households. The infected animals sustain parasite egg spread via open environment defecation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.05.003DOI Listing
May 2018
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Epidemiology of Opisthorchis viverrini Infection.

Adv Parasitol 2018 29;101:41-67. Epub 2018 May 29.

Faculty of Health, School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Opisthorchiasis in the Lower Mekong Subregion is a parasitic disease caused by the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini. This parasite has a well-documented distribution in Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia, Myanmar and Southern Vietnam. In this chapter, we describe the current knowledge of the epidemiology of O. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.05.002DOI Listing
May 2018
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Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Detection of Opisthorchis viverrini Sensu Lato in Human and Intermediate Hosts for Use in Control and Elimination Programs.

Adv Parasitol 2018 31;101:177-214. Epub 2018 May 31.

Cholangiocarcinoma Screening and Care Program (CASCAP) and Institute of Cholangiocarcinoma, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

Opisthorchiasis is a neglected tropical disease, caused by infection with the fish-borne trematode Opisthorchis viverrini sensu lato that afflicts more than 10million people in Southeast Asia, including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia. The disease is characterized by a chronic infection that induces hepatobiliary inflammation, especially periductal fibrosis, which can be detected by ultrasonography. This chronic inflammation eventually leads to cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a usually fatal bile duct cancer that develops in approximately 1% of O. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.05.007DOI Listing
May 2018
45 Reads

Opisthorchiasis-Induced Cholangiocarcinoma: How Innate Immunity May Cause Cancer.

Adv Parasitol 2018 29;101:149-176. Epub 2018 May 29.

Tropical Medicine Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Control of Opisthorchiasis (Southeast Asian Liver Fluke Disease), Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

Innate, inflammatory responses towards persistent Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) infection are likely to contribute to the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a liver cancer that is rare in the West but prevalent in Greater Mekong Subregion countries in Southeast Asia. Infection results in the infiltration of innate immune cells into the bile ducts and subsequent activation of inflammatory immune responses that fail to clear OV but instead may damage local tissues within the bile ducts. Not all patients infected with OV develop CCA, and so tumourigenesis may be dependent on multiple factors including the magnitude of the inflammatory response that is activated in infected individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.05.006DOI Listing
May 2018
28 Reads

Opisthorchis viverrini Draft Genome - Biomedical Implications and Future Avenues.

Adv Parasitol 2018 6;101:125-148. Epub 2018 Jun 6.

The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.

Opisthorchiasis is a neglected tropical disease of major proportion, caused by the carcinogenic, Asian liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. This hepatobiliary disease is known to be associated with malignant cancer (cholangiocarcinoma, CCA) and affects millions of people in Southeast Asia. No vaccine is available, and only one drug (praziquantel) is routinely employed against the parasite. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.05.005DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Taxonomy, Ecology and Population Genetics of Opisthorchis viverrini and Its Intermediate Hosts.

Adv Parasitol 2018 24;101:1-39. Epub 2018 May 24.

Cholangiocarcinoma Screening and Care Program (CASCAP), Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

There have been considerable advances in our understanding of the systematics and ecology of Opisthorchis viverrini; however, this new knowledge has not only clarified but also complicated the situation. We now know that what was once considered to be a single species is, in fact, a species complex, with the individual species being confined to specific wetland areas. There is also a strong genetic association between the members of the O. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.05.001DOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

Climate Change and the Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Authors:
Mark Booth

Adv Parasitol 2018 28;100:39-126. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

Newcastle University, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Climate change is expected to impact across every domain of society, including health. The majority of the world's population is susceptible to pathological, infectious disease whose life cycles are sensitive to environmental factors across different physical phases including air, water and soil. Nearly all so-called neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) fall into this category, meaning that future geographic patterns of transmission of dozens of infections are likely to be affected by climate change over the short (seasonal), medium (annual) and long (decadal) term. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.02.001DOI Listing

Human Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases: Heading Towards 2050.

Authors:
Peter J Hotez

Adv Parasitol 2018 5;100:29-38. Epub 2018 Apr 5.

National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States; Department of Pediatrics, Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States; Department of Biology, Baylor University, Waco, TX, United States. Electronic address:

By 2050 our civilized planet may be comprised predominantly of networked megacities embedded in warm subtropical and tropical climates, and under stress from climate change and catastrophic weather events. Urban slum areas in these cities, including those found in wealthier middle- and high-income nations (blue marble health), will be especially vulnerable to disease. Moreover, regional conflicts fought over shifting and limited resources, including water, will collapse health systems infrastructures to further promote disease emergence and reemergence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.03.002DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads

Parasite Dispersal From the Ornamental Goldfish Trade.

Adv Parasitol 2018 2;100:239-281. Epub 2018 May 2.

Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia.

Goldfish, Carassius auratus Linnaeus, 1758, are immensely popular ornamental cyprinid fish, traded in more than 100 countries. For more than 500 years, human translocation has facilitated the spread of goldfish globally, which has enabled numerous and repeated introductions of parasite taxa that infect them. The parasite fauna assemblage of goldfish is generally well documented, but few studies provide evidence of parasite coinvasion following the release of goldfish. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.03.001DOI Listing
May 2018
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Exploring Structural and Physical Properties of Schistosome Eggs: Potential Pathways for Novel Diagnostics?

Adv Parasitol 2018 20;100:209-237. Epub 2018 Apr 20.

School of Veterinary Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

In this era of increasing demand for sensitive techniques to diagnose schistosomiasis, there is a need for an increased focus on the properties of the parasite eggs. The eggs are not only directly linked to the morbidity of chronic infection but are also potential key targets for accurate diagnostics. Eggs were the primary target of diagnostic tools in the past and we argue they could be the target of highly sensitive tools in the future if we focus on characteristics of their structure and shell surface that could be exploited for enhanced detection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.03.003DOI Listing
April 2018
2 Reads

Clonorchis sinensis and Clonorchiasis: The Relevance of Exploring Genetic Variation.

Adv Parasitol 2018 4;100:155-208. Epub 2018 May 4.

Melbourne Veterinary School, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. Electronic address:

Parasitic trematodes (flukes) cause substantial mortality and morbidity in humans. The Chinese liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis, is one of the most destructive parasitic worms in humans in China, Vietnam, Korea and the Russian Far East. Although C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.03.006DOI Listing
May 2018
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100 Years of Mass Deworming Programmes: A Policy Perspective From the World Bank's Disease Control Priorities Analyses.

Adv Parasitol 2018 27;100:127-154. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

University of Kelaniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka.

For more than 100 years, countries have used mass drug administration as a public health response to soil-transmitted helminth infection. The series of analyses published as Disease Control Priorities is the World Bank's vehicle for exploring the cost-effectiveness and value for money of public health interventions. The first edition was published in 1993 as a technical supplement to the World Bank's World Development Report Investing in Health where deworming was used as an illustrative example of value for money in treating diseases with relatively low morbidity but high prevalence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.03.005DOI Listing
April 2018
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An Important Milestone in Parasitology: Celebrating a Hundred Volumes of Advances in Parasitology.

Adv Parasitol 2018 24;100:1-27. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom.

Beginning in 1963, the founding rationale of Advances in Parasitology was to provide authentic, well-documented reviews by leading experts, about the progress being made in their area of specialism to inform the wider cadre of parasitologists, disseminating this information across allied disciplines and all users. Some 55 years later, the Series has accumulated over 667 published articles, with just over 650 authors contributing either alone or in collaboration, and has successfully served the parasitological needs of medical, veterinary and wildlife scientific communities with equity, notwithstanding treatises on vectors or intermediate hosts, as well as 'honorary parasites' such as viruses, bacteria and fungi. The first production of Advances in Parasitology united the publishing offices of Academic Press in the USA (New York) and the UK (London), maintaining Webster or Oxford writing styles, but unlike its production, all seven editors, beginning with Professor Ben Dawes, have been UK-based. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.03.004DOI Listing
April 2018
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Molecular Epidemiology of Anisakis and Anisakiasis: An Ecological and Evolutionary Road Map.

Adv Parasitol 2018 6;99:93-263. Epub 2018 Mar 6.

Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy.

This review addresses the biodiversity, biology, distribution, ecology, epidemiology, and consumer health significance of the so far known species of Anisakis, both in their natural hosts and in human accidental host populations, worldwide. These key aspects of the Anisakis species' biology are highlighted, since we consider them as main driving forces behind which most of the research in this field has been carried out over the past decade. From a public health perspective, the human disease caused by Anisakis species (anisakiasis) appears to be considerably underreported and underestimated in many countries or regions around the globe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.12.001DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads

Monogenean Parasite Cultures: Current Techniques and Recent Advances.

Adv Parasitol 2018 19;99:61-91. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Marine Parasitology Laboratory, Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture and the College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia.

Global expansion in fish production and trade of aquatic ornamental species requires advances in aquatic animal health management. Aquatic parasite cultures permit diverse research opportunities to understand parasite-host dynamics and are essential to validate the efficacy of treatments that could reduce infections in captive populations. Monogeneans are important pathogenic parasites of captured captive fishes and exhibit a single-host life cycle, which makes them amenable to in vivo culture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.01.002DOI Listing
February 2018
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The Evolutionary Biology, Ecology and Epidemiology of Coccidia of Passerine Birds.

Adv Parasitol 2018 12;99:35-60. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Coccidia are intracellular parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa that cause a range of pathologies collectively termed coccidiosis. Species of coccidia of commercial importance have been well studied, with the effect of other species on passerine birds receiving increasing attention. In this chapter, we review the literature on coccidia in passerines, with a particular focus on wild populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.01.001DOI Listing
February 2018

Expanding the Vector Control Toolbox for Malaria Elimination: A Systematic Review of the Evidence.

Adv Parasitol 2018 27;99:345-379. Epub 2018 Feb 27.

Malaria Elimination Initiative, Global Health Group, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States.

Background: Additional vector control tools (VCTs) are needed to supplement insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) to achieve malaria elimination in many settings. To identify options for expanding the malaria vector control toolbox, we conducted a systematic review of the availability and quality of the evidence for 21 malaria VCTs, excluding ITNs and IRS.

Methods: Six electronic databases and grey literature sources were searched from January 1, 1980 to September 28, 2015 to identify systematic reviews, Phase I-IV studies, and observational studies that measured the effect of malaria VCTs on epidemiological or entomological outcomes across any age groups in all malaria-endemic settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2018.01.003DOI Listing
February 2018
8 Reads

Evolution, Systematics, and Biogeography of the Triatominae, Vectors of Chagas Disease.

Adv Parasitol 2018 ;99:265-344

Grupo Triatomíneos, Instituto René Rachou, FIOCRUZ, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

In this chapter, we review and update current knowledge about the evolution, systematics, and biogeography of the Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)-true bugs that feed primarily on vertebrate blood. In the Americas, triatomines are the vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. Despite declining incidence and prevalence, Chagas disease is still a major public health concern in Latin America. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.12.002DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Parasites of the Giant Panda: A Risk Factor in the Conservation of a Species.

Adv Parasitol 2018 16;99:1-33. Epub 2018 Feb 16.

Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.

The giant panda, with an estimated population size of 2239 in the world (in 2015), is a global symbol of wildlife conservation that is threatened by habitat loss, poor reproduction and limited resistance to some infectious diseases. Of these factors, some diseases caused by parasites are considered as the foremost threat to its conservation. However, there is surprisingly little published information on the parasites of the giant panda, most of which has been disseminated in the Chinese literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.12.003DOI Listing
February 2018
2 Reads

Hook, Line and Infection: A Guide to Culturing Parasites, Establishing Infections and Assessing Immune Responses in the Three-Spined Stickleback.

Adv Parasitol 2017 9;98:39-109. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is a model organism with an extremely well-characterized ecology, evolutionary history, behavioural repertoire and parasitology that is coupled with published genomic data. These small temperate zone fish therefore provide an ideal experimental system to study common diseases of coldwater fish, including those of aquacultural importance. However, detailed information on the culture of stickleback parasites, the establishment and maintenance of infections and the quantification of host responses is scattered between primary and grey literature resources, some of which is not readily accessible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.07.001DOI Listing
November 2017
1 Read

Trypanosoma congolense: Molecular Toolkit and Resources for Studying a Major Livestock Pathogen and Model Trypanosome.

Adv Parasitol 2017 5;98:283-309. Epub 2017 May 5.

University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

The African trypanosomiases are diseases of humans and their livestock caused by trypanosomes carried by bloodsucking tsetse flies. Although the human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei is the best known, other trypanosome species are of greater concern for animal health in sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, Trypanosomacongolense is a major cattle pathogen, which is as amenable to laboratory culture as T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.03.002DOI Listing
November 2017
27 Reads

The Battle Against Flystrike - Past Research and New Prospects Through Genomics.

Adv Parasitol 2017 5;98:227-281. Epub 2017 May 5.

The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.

Flystrike, or cutaneous myiasis, is caused by blow fly larvae of the genus Lucilia. This disease is a major problem in countries with large sheep populations. In Australia, Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann, 1830) is the principal fly involved in flystrike. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.03.001DOI Listing
November 2017
11 Reads

Life History, Systematics and Evolution of the Diplostomoidea Poirier, 1886: Progress, Promises and Challenges Emerging From Molecular Studies.

Adv Parasitol 2017 20;98:167-225. Epub 2017 Jun 20.

University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico.

Members of the Diplostomoidea mature in amniotes and employ vertebrates, annelids and molluscs as second intermediate hosts. Diplostomoid life cycles generally follow a three-host pattern typical of digeneans, but novelties have arisen in some species, including obligate four-host life cycles, vertical transmission, and intracellular parasitism. In this review, we summarize the basic biology of diplostomoids with reference to molecular studies, and present challenges, gaps and areas where molecular data could address long-standing questions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.05.001DOI Listing
November 2017

Advances in Spermatological Characters in the Digenea: Review and Proposal of Spermatozoa Models and Their Phylogenetic Importance.

Adv Parasitol 2017 22;98:111-165. Epub 2017 May 22.

CNRS - Università di Corsica, UMR 6134 - SPE, Corte, France.

The wide biodiversity and economic importance of digeneans have motivated a great deal of research in the last decade, focussing on their phylogenetic positions. Molecular research was instrumental for our understanding of phylogeny in the Digenea, but spermatological studies have also provided many results, which are potentially useful for phylogeny; however, the complete spermatological data set has never been reviewed in a whole phylogenetic perspective. Spermatological data are now available for more than 100 species, belonging to 15 superfamilies and 46 families. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.04.001DOI Listing
November 2017
27 Reads

Measuring the Effect of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections on Cognitive Function in Children: Systematic Review and Critical Appraisal of Evidence.

Adv Parasitol 2017 2;98:1-37. Epub 2017 Jun 2.

Spatial Epidemiology Laboratory, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, Australia; Children's Health and Environment Program, Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Recently the role of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in children's cognitive developmental impairment has been under scrutiny. We conducted a systematic review of the evidence for associations between STH infections and cognitive function of children using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses protocol. We aimed to identify the domains of cognitive function in three age strata (<24months, 24-59months and ≥60months) and critically appraise the general design protocol of the studies, with a focus on the cognitive function measurement tools used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.05.002DOI Listing
November 2017
12 Reads

Host-Parasite Relationships and Life Histories of Trypanosomes in Australia.

Adv Parasitol 2017 29;97:47-109. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA, Australia.

Trypanosomes constitute a group of flagellate protozoan parasites responsible for a number of important, yet neglected, diseases in both humans and livestock. The most significantly studied include the causative agents of African sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei) and Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) in humans. Much of our knowledge about trypanosome host-parasite relationships and life histories has come from these two human pathogens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2016.06.001DOI Listing
August 2017
2 Reads

Is Predominant Clonal Evolution a Common Evolutionary Adaptation to Parasitism in Pathogenic Parasitic Protozoa, Fungi, Bacteria, and Viruses?

Adv Parasitol 2017 21;97:243-325. Epub 2016 Oct 21.

University of California at Irvine, United States.

We propose that predominant clonal evolution (PCE) in microbial pathogens be defined as restrained recombination on an evolutionary scale, with genetic exchange scarce enough to not break the prevalent pattern of clonal population structure. The main features of PCE are (1) strong linkage disequilibrium, (2) the widespread occurrence of stable genetic clusters blurred by occasional bouts of genetic exchange ('near-clades'), (3) the existence of a "clonality threshold", beyond which recombination is efficiently countered by PCE, and near-clades irreversibly diverge. We hypothesize that the PCE features are not mainly due to natural selection but also chiefly originate from in-built genetic properties of pathogens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2016.08.007DOI Listing
August 2017
3 Reads

The Role of Spatial Statistics in the Control and Elimination of Neglected Tropical Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Focus on Human African Trypanosomiasis, Schistosomiasis and Lymphatic Filariasis.

Authors:
M C Stanton

Adv Parasitol 2017 9;97:187-241. Epub 2017 Mar 9.

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Disease control and elimination programmes can benefit greatly from accurate information on the spatial variability of disease risk, particularly when risk is highly spatially heterogeneous. Due to advances in statistical methodology, coupled with the increased availability of geospatial technology, this information is becoming increasingly accessible. In this chapter we describe recent advancements in spatial methods associated with the analysis of disease data measured at the point-level and demonstrate their application to the control and elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0065308X173001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2017.01.001DOI Listing
August 2017
1 Read

Targeting the Parasite to Suppress Malaria Transmission.

Authors:
R E Sinden

Adv Parasitol 2017 12;97:147-185. Epub 2016 Nov 12.

The Jenner Institute, Oxford, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

This article attempts to draw together current knowledge on the biology of Plasmodium and experience gained from past control campaigns to interpret and guide current efforts to discover and develop exciting new strategies targeting the parasite with the objective of interrupting transmission. Particular note is made of the advantages of targeting often unappreciated small, yet vital, bottleneck populations to enhance both the impact and the useful lifetime of hard-won interventions. A case is made for the standardization of methods to measure transmission blockade to permit the rational comparison of how diverse interventions (drugs, vaccines, insecticides, Genetically Modified technologies) targeting disparate aspects of parasite biology may impact upon the commonly used parameter of parasite prevalence in the human population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2016.09.004DOI Listing
August 2017
3 Reads

The Compatibility Between Biomphalaria glabrata Snails and Schistosoma mansoni: An Increasingly Complex Puzzle.

Adv Parasitol 2017 15;97:111-145. Epub 2016 Sep 15.

University of Perpignan, Perpignan, France.

This review reexamines the results obtained in recent decades regarding the compatibility polymorphism between the snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, and the pathogen, Schistosoma mansoni, which is one of the agents responsible for human schistosomiasis. Some results point to the snail's resistance as explaining the incompatibility, while others support a "matching hypothesis" between the snail's immune receptors and the schistosome's antigens. We propose here that the two hypotheses are not exclusive, and that the compatible/incompatible status of a particular host/parasite couple probably reflects the balance of multiple molecular determinants that support one hypothesis or the other. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2016.08.006DOI Listing
August 2017
2 Reads

Chagas Disease Diagnostic Applications: Present Knowledge and Future Steps.

Adv Parasitol 2017 14;97:1-45. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnológicas - Instituto Tecnológico de Chascomús (IIB-INTECH), Universidad Nacional de San Martín (UNSAM) - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a lifelong and debilitating illness of major significance throughout Latin America and an emergent threat to global public health. Being a neglected disease, the vast majority of Chagasic patients have limited access to proper diagnosis and treatment, and there is only a marginal investment into R&D for drug and vaccine development. In this context, identification of novel biomarkers able to transcend the current limits of diagnostic methods surfaces as a main priority in Chagas disease applied research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2016.10.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5363286PMC
August 2017
1 Read

Preface.

Adv Parasitol 2017 ;96:xiii-xiv

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-308X(17)30023-4DOI Listing
February 2018
2 Reads

Echinococcosis: Control and Prevention.

Adv Parasitol 2017 28;96:55-158. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Sichuan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Chengdu, China.

Human cystic echinococcosis (CE) has been eliminated or significantly reduced as a public health problem in several previously highly endemic regions. This has been achieved by the long-term application of prevention and control measures primarily targeted to deworming dogs, health education, meat inspection, and effective surveillance in livestock and human populations. Human CE, however, remains a serious neglected zoonotic disease in many resource-poor pastoral regions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2016.09.002DOI Listing
August 2017
2 Reads

The Echinococcoses: Diagnosis, Clinical Management and Burden of Disease.

Adv Parasitol 2017 8;96:259-369. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France.

The echinococcoses are chronic, parasitic diseases that are acquired after ingestion of infective taeniid tapeworm eggs from certain species of the genus Echinococcus. Cystic echinococcosis (CE) occurs worldwide, whereas, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is restricted to the northern hemisphere, and neotropical echinococcosis (NE) has only been identified in Central and South America. Clinical manifestations and disease courses vary profoundly for the different species of Echinococcus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2016.09.006DOI Listing
August 2017
6 Reads

Laboratory Diagnosis of Echinococcus spp. in Human Patients and Infected Animals.

Adv Parasitol 2017 17;96:159-257. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Institute of Parasitology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Among the species composing the genus Echinococcus, four species are of human clinical interest. The most prevalent species are Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis, followed by Echinococcus vogeli and Echinococcus oligarthrus. The first two species cause cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2016.09.003DOI Listing
August 2017
3 Reads