740 results match your criteria Advances in parasitology[Journal]


Preface: Development strategy of NIPD-CTDR in the new era.

Adv Parasitol 2020 ;110:xxiii-xxxii

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Diseases Control and Prevention; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-308X(20)30105-6DOI Listing
January 2020

The contributions and achievements on malaria control and forthcoming elimination in China over the past 70 years by NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 30;110:63-105. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Although the past decades have seen a remarkable decrease in malaria-caused mortality and morbidity, the infection remains a significant challenge to global health. In the battle against malaria, China has gained notable feat and achievement since the 1940s through the efforts of several generations. Notably, China has not recorded a single indigenous malaria case since August 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.03.005DOI Listing
April 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Contribution of NIPD-CTDR to the parasitic diseases control and elimination in China: Memory of the 70th anniversary for NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 6;110:401-427. Epub 2020 May 6.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

China has achieved a great success in control and elimination of key parasitic diseases. In 2007, the elimination of lymphatic filariasis was verified by WHO. The schistosomiasis incidence and snail-distributed areas have reduced to the lowest level in the history. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.02.003DOI Listing
May 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Establishment and application of the National Parasitic Resource Center (NPRC) in China.

Adv Parasitol 2020 18;110:373-400. Epub 2020 May 18.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; School of Global Health, Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

The National Parasitic Resource Center (NPRC) was created in 2004. It is a first-level platform under the Basic Condition Platform Center of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China. The resource centre involves 21 depository institutions in 15 regions of the country, including human parasite and vector depository, animal parasite depository, plant nematode characteristic specimen library, medical insect characteristic specimen library, trematode model specimen library, parasite-vector/snail model specimen library, etc. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.006DOI Listing
May 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Construction and application of surveillance and response systems for parasitic diseases in China, led by NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 13;110:349-371. Epub 2020 May 13.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Parasitic diseases have been widely epidemic in China with a long history. Great endeavours made in past 70 years led to significant decrease in morbidity and mortablity caused by several major parasitic diseases, while challenges existed to eliminate parasitic diseases. Surveillance-response system has play a crucial role in identifying public health problems, ascertaining the distribution and epidemic dynamics, discovering outbreaks and epidemic anomalies, evaluating the effects of on-site intervention activities and identifying risk factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7220163PMC
May 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Epidemiological big data and analytical tools applied in the control programmes on parasitic diseases in China: NIPD's sustained contributions in 70 years.

Adv Parasitol 2020 30;110:319-347. Epub 2020 May 30.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

The analysis of epidemiological data has played an important role for the academic research carried out by the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, China CDC, since its foundation in 1950s. Those researches, e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.009DOI Listing
May 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Control of taeniasis and cysticercosis in China.

Adv Parasitol 2020 18;110:289-317. Epub 2020 May 18.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

National surveys suggest that the prevalence of taeniasis has considerably decreased in China, while reported cases indicated T. solium cysticercosis was historically highly endemic in northeastern, central and southwestern China. The high prevalence of taeniasis and cysticercosis there was driven by socio-ecological determinants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.005DOI Listing
May 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Control of eosinopilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis in China.

Adv Parasitol 2020 25;110:269-288. Epub 2020 Mar 25.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the major infective agent of human eosinophilic meningitis (EM) in the world. The parasite was first noted in China in 1933. However, the public health importance was not realized until several EM outbreaks occurred recent years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.02.002DOI Listing
March 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

From awareness to action: NIPD's engagement in the control of food-borne clonorchiasis.

Adv Parasitol 2020 18;110:245-267. Epub 2020 May 18.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Clonorchiasis is caused by ingestion of raw freshwater fish containing infective larvae of Clonorchis sinensis. China harbours the largest number of people with C. sinensis infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.004DOI Listing
May 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Engagement of the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases in control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in China.

Adv Parasitol 2020 29;110:217-244. Epub 2020 May 29.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Soil-transmitted helminthiases (STHs) have been widely transmitted in China and the control of STHs was initiated by NIPD-CTDR since its foundation. Three national surveys on STHs have been carried out in China, and the infection rate has dropped from 53.58% in the first national survey (1988-92) to 4. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.008DOI Listing
May 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Contributions of the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases to the control of visceral leishmaniasis in China.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;110:185-216. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; School of Global Health, Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania spp. is an important vector-borne disease prevalent in China. VL was rampant in the vast area of China north of the Yangtze River before the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.003DOI Listing
June 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Contributions to the lymphatic filariasis elimination programme and post-elimination surveillance in China by NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 18;110:145-183. Epub 2020 May 18.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

China was once one of the most heavily endemic for lymphatic filariasis (LF), with a heavy disease burden. Due to decades of sustained efforts, LF was eliminated from China in 2007. The historical tales in the control and elimination of LF in China and current post-elimination surveillance are reviewed and concluded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.007DOI Listing

Contribution to the echinococcosis control programme in China by NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 3;110:107-144. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

As a zoonotic parasitosis caused by the parasitism of Echinococcus larvae, echinococcosis imposes serious disease and economic burdens on human beings and society, and is thus a global public health issue. Its complex life history, wide distribution, the combined influence of various epidemic factors, coupled with the unique natural environment, customs, and religious beliefs in endemic areas, pose a huge challenge to the national echinococcosis control programme in China. Accurate early detection and confirmation of diagnosis of echinococcosis, the use of effective drugs, real-time surveillance of the infection status of populations and various hosts, controlling the source of infection, and blocking the route of transmission are of enormous significance for control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.010DOI Listing
June 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Contributions and achievements on schistosomiasis control and elimination in China by NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;110:1-62. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; School of Global Health, Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Being a zoonotic parasitic disease, schistosomiasis was widely spread in 12 provinces of Southern China in the 1950s, severly harming human health and hindering economic development. The National Institute of Parasitic Diseases at the Chinese Center for Diseases Control and Prevention, and Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research (NIPD-CTDR), as the only professional institution focussing on parasitic diseases at the national level, has played an important role in schistosomiasis control in the country. In this article, we look back at the changes of schistosomiasis endemicity and the contribution of NIPD-CTDR to the national schistosomiasis control programme. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.002DOI Listing
June 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Construction and application of surveillance and response systems for parasitic diseases in China, led by NIPD.

Adv Parasitol 2020 May 13. Epub 2020 May 13.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; National Center for Tropical Diseases Research; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, WHO Collaborating Center for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Parasitic diseases have been widely epidemic in China with a long history. Great endeavours made in past 70 years led to significant decrease in morbidity and mortablity caused by several major parasitic diseases, while challenges existed to eliminate parasitic diseases. Surveillance-response system has play a crucial role in identifying public health problems, ascertaining the distribution and epidemic dynamics, discovering outbreaks and epidemic anomalies, evaluating the effects of on-site intervention activities and identifying risk factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.001DOI Listing

Preface.

Adv Parasitol 2020 ;109:xxvii-xxviii

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, Massachusetts.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-308X(20)30086-5DOI Listing
January 2020

Toxocara "omics" and the promises it holds for medicine and veterinary medicine.

Adv Parasitol 2020 1;109:89-108. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Protein Engineering in Animal Vaccines, College of Veterinary Medicine, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, China. Electronic address:

Toxocariasis is one of the most neglected worldwide zoonoses that is caused by larval nematode parasites of the genus Toxocara, Toxocara canis, and to a lesser extent, Toxocara cati, whose migration mechanism is still largely unknown. Fortunately, some advanced tools have been employed, such as genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, to better understand the molecular biology and regulatory mechanisms of Toxocara. Using genomics and transcriptomics, we can identify a large number of genes that participate in the development of Toxocara and the interaction of parasites and their hosts and can predict the functions of unknown genes by comparing them with other relevant species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.002DOI Listing

Toxocariasis: A neglected infection for the Anthropocene epoch.

Authors:
Peter J Hotez

Adv Parasitol 2020 6;109:879-883. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development, Departments of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States; Hagler Institute for Advanced Studies at Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States; Department of Biology, Baylor University, Waco, TX, United States; James A Baker III Institute of Public Policy, Rice University, Houston, TX, United States; Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States. Electronic address:

While ascariasis, trichuriasis, and hookworm infection dominate global efforts to control human soil-transmitted helminth infections, a picture is unfolding to suggest that toxocariasis is now a fourth and perhaps equally important parasitic disease. Toxocara eggs are widespread in the environment and practically ubiquitous in the soils of many subtropical and tropical regions of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Human zoonotic infection is also highly prevalent in these areas, based on serologic studies to detect anti-Toxocara antibodies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.03.004DOI Listing

Toxocara canis in Australia.

Authors:
David J Jenkins

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:873-878. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia. Electronic address:

This review covers reports on prevalence Toxocara in dogs from 2000 to the present and views of the veterinary community as to the importance of it as a zoonosis within Australia. The contamination of soils in public areas with eggs of this parasite seems overall to be minimal for reasons related to required collection of faeces from pets and the use of routine deworming and combination dewormers associated with heartworm prevention. The potential of other canid hosts being sources of eggs is likely common, especially with the increasing red fox and wild dog populations in more urbanized environs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.033DOI Listing
February 2020

Prevalence of Toxocara in dogs and cats in Africa.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:861-871. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Clinical Studies Department, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia. Electronic address:

Dogs and cats have a close association with humans providing companionship; however, pets are reservoirs of zoonotic pathogens such as Toxocara. Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are small intestinal nematodes found in canids and felids, respectively. Infected pets shed thousands of eggs resulting in environmental contamination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.032DOI Listing
February 2020

Epidemiology of Toxocara spp. in dogs and cats in mainland China, 2000-2019.

Adv Parasitol 2020 3;109:843-860. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology of Gansu Province, Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Lanzhou, China; Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Protein Engineering in Animal Vaccines, College of Veterinary Medicine, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, China. Electronic address:

Toxocariasis is a neglected parasitic zoonosis. Although some studies have reported the Toxocara prevalence in dogs and cats in mainland China, there is a lack of comprehensive analysis of these data. Here, we conducted the first systematic review based on relevant literatures published in Web of Science, PubMed and CNKI from January 2000 to July 2019 to assess the prevalence of Toxocara infection in dogs and cats in mainland China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.031DOI Listing

Canine Toxocariosis: Its prevalence, incidence and occurrence in the Indian subcontinent.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:819-842. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States.

Toxocariosis is an important neglected tropical helminth disease of zoonotic significance for which canids are the definitive hosts. Dogs are also considered the sentinel host for the occurrence of T. canis infections in humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.018DOI Listing
February 2020

Toxocara prevalence in dogs, cats and the environment in Russia.

Adv Parasitol 2020 9;109:801-817. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology, Tropical and Vector-Borne Diseases, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.

The toxocariasis incidence in Russia is relatively low (1.8 cases per 100,000 individuals) and the parasite is not a major healthcare concern. However, the proportion of primary hosts testing positive for the parasite is high and varies between 3% and 100% in dogs (on average 33%), and between 6% and 52% in cats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.019DOI Listing

Prevalence of patent Toxocara spp. infections in dogs and cats in Europe from 1994 to 2019.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:779-800. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Objectives: To provide an overview of Toxocara prevalences in dogs and cats in Europe from the last 25 years.

Method: Systematic review of the literature.

Results: Over the past 25 years, prevalence studies of Toxocara spp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.030DOI Listing
February 2020

Prevalence of Toxocara spp. in dogs and cats in South America (excluding Brazil).

Adv Parasitol 2020 22;109:743-778. Epub 2020 Feb 22.

CIBAV Research Group, Medicine Veterinary School, Agrarian Sciences Faculty, University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia. Electronic address:

Toxocariasis is a worldwide anthropozoonosis caused by Toxocara spp. nematodes. High prevalences of the disease has been found in developing countries, particularly in regions with poor sanitary conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.029DOI Listing
February 2020

Toxocara prevalence in dogs and cats in Brazil.

Adv Parasitol 2020 20;109:715-741. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Department of Immunology, Aggeu Magalhães Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Electronic address:

I herein review published studies reporting the prevalence of Toxocara infection in dogs and cats in Brazil. Based on data gathered from faecal examinations of approximately 38,940 dogs and 5600 cats from different Brazilian studies, the mean prevalence of Toxocara infection is 11.4% (range: 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.028DOI Listing
February 2020

Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati in domestic dogs and cats in the United States, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean: A review.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:655-714. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, United States.

Toxocara prevalence ranges from 0 to >87% and 0 to >60% in dogs and cats, respectively, within the United States, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. Higher prevalence occurs in animals less than 1 year of age. Overall, prevalence is higher in cats compared to dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.027DOI Listing
February 2020

Toxocara spp. in dogs and cats in Canada.

Authors:
Emily J Jenkins

Adv Parasitol 2020 5;109:641-653. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Zoonotic Parasite Research Unit, Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. Electronic address:

Toxocara spp. (T. canis and T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.026DOI Listing
February 2020

Visceral larval migrans of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati in non-canid and non-felid hosts.

Adv Parasitol 2020 1;109:63-88. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States. Electronic address:

Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are considered the most ubiquitous gastrointestinal helminths in domesticated canids and felids. Ascarid eggs passed in the faeces of canids and felids in a suitable environment may remain infective for years and are capable of infecting not only canids and felids, but a large range of other vertebrate paratenic hosts, including man. Infection with Toxocara species also occurs following the ingestion of paratenic hosts containing infective larvae. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.02.001DOI Listing

Global prevalence of Toxocara infection in cats.

Adv Parasitol 2020 25;109:615-639. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. Electronic address:

Zoonotic parasites, including Toxocara species, of pet and stray cats are of public health importance. Justification for, and the design and implementation of prevention and control of human toxocariasis may benefit from an understanding of the zoonotic potential and prevalence of parasites in this definitive host species. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies, conducted to estimate the prevalence of Toxocara infection(s) in cats by geographical location, type (rural vs urban and stray vs pet), gender and age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.025DOI Listing
April 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Sources of environmental contamination with Toxocara spp.: An omnipresent parasite.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:585-614. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Division of Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Centre for Infectious Disease Control (CIb), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

Embryonated Toxocara eggs in the environment are considered to be the most important source of human toxocariasis. These eggs, however, are also a source of infection for the definitive and paratenic hosts. Most available literature focuses on Toxocara canis in dogs, or other canids. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.010DOI Listing
February 2020

Global prevalence of Toxocara infection in dogs.

Adv Parasitol 2020 26;109:561-583. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. Electronic address:

Dogs serve as the most important definitive hosts for Toxocara canis-a causative agent of human toxocariasis and one of the most widespread zoonotic helminth worldwide. The present study was undertaken to assess the global prevalence of T. canis infection in dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.017DOI Listing
February 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Antigen detection: Insights into Toxocara and other ascarid infections in dogs and cats.

Authors:
David A Elsemore

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:545-559. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

IDEXX Laboratories, Inc., Westbrook, ME, United States. Electronic address:

Detection of ascarid excreted or secreted (E/S) molecules is an alternative approach to the identification of infection by egg flotation. E/S molecules serve as direct markers for the ascarid nematode commonly found in cats and dogs (Toxocara spp., Toxascaris leonina and Baylisascaris procyonis). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.034DOI Listing
February 2020

Pathology of larvae and adults in dogs and cats.

Authors:
Andrew D Miller

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:537-544. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomic Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States. Electronic address:

Endoparasitism remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in puppies and kittens. The ascarids of dogs and cats (Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, Toxocara cati) cause significant pathology due to either larval migration or adult nematode burden within the gastrointestinal tract. This chapter will review the important pathologic events and lesions that are encountered during ascarid development in dogs and cats with emphasis given to the characteristic gross pathology lesions that are seen in affected animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.024DOI Listing
February 2020

Seroepidemiology of human toxocariasis in North Africa.

Authors:
Ahmed Awad Adeel

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:501-534. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Independent Consultant, Lawrenceville, GA, United States. Electronic address:

Seroprevalence studies on human toxocariasis help to assess the burden and the morbidity associated with this zoonosis. This review searched the seroprevalence studies and case reports in six North African countries: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan and Tunisia, since 1990. The search also included studies on the environmental factors related to the risk of transmission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.023DOI Listing
February 2020
6.226 Impact Factor

Seroprevalence of Toxocara spp. antibodies in humans in Africa: A review.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:483-499. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Centre of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location AMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Background: Human toxocariasis occurs worldwide and is caused by nematodes of the species of the genus Toxocara. Infection occurs by the ingestion of eggs and is usually asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic. However, severe manifestations occur. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.022DOI Listing
February 2020

Sources and seroprevalence of toxocariasis in Turkey.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:465-482. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Hitit University School of Medicine, Corum, Turkey; Department of Medical Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology, Near East University School of Medicine, Nicosia, Cyprus. Electronic address:

Toxocariasis in humans is considered a rare disease in Turkey, and the absence of specific symptoms of this disease is probably the main reason for clinicians to underestimate and underdiagnose the disease. Although there are several seroepidemiological studies on visceral larva migrans in the country, a comparison between them is difficult as the serological tests are not standardised. After the introduction of the easily accessible ELISA kit in the market, the number of seroepidemiological studies has increased in which the reported rates ranged between 1% and 56%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.021DOI Listing
February 2020

Seroprevalence of Toxocara spp. infection in Southeast Asia and Taiwan.

Adv Parasitol 2020 5;109:449-463. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Department of Molecular Parasitology and Tropical Diseases, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Research Center of International Tropical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Tropical Medicine Division, International PhD Program in Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address:

Human toxocariasis is a worldwide neglected zoonotic parasitic disease and caused mainly by Toxocara canis, and to a lesser event, by T. cati. There are only 16 epidemiological studies and 5 clinical toxocariasis case reports in 11 Southeast Asia countries and Taiwan (SEAT) that were found by searching data from PubMed in the period from January 1992 to August 2019. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.020DOI Listing
February 2020

Current epidemic situation of human toxocariasis in China.

Adv Parasitol 2020 5;109:433-448. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Department of Pathogen Biology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Research, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address:

Toxocariasis is a worldwide-distributed helminthic zoonosis, which mainly results from ascarid nematodes Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati. Humans become infected by accidental ingestion of infective eggs, raw or undercooked meat containing larvae. Keeping and contacting cats and dogs, and bad hygiene situations or habits are the main risk factors for Toxocara infection in China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.016DOI Listing
February 2020

Seroprevalence and incidence of human toxocarosis in Russia.

Adv Parasitol 2020 9;109:419-432. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology, Tropical and Vector-Borne Diseases, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

Overall incidence of toxocariasis in Russia is low and varies between 1.6 and 2.7 per 100,000, while in several hyper-endemic regions, such as Altay, Kurgan, Perm and Udmurtia, it reaches 43 per 100,000. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.015DOI Listing

The anatomy of the third-stage larva of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati.

Authors:
Dwight D Bowman

Adv Parasitol 2020 21;109:39-61. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States. Electronic address:

This review describes the morphology and ultrastructure of the third-stage larva of Toxocara canis, the larval stage that hatches from the egg and persists in the tissues of various paratenic hosts including infected humans. This larva remains unchanged as it passes from host to host and lives for extended periods in this same body form until it makes its way to the gastro-intestinal tract of its final host. There has been less work on the anatomy and ultrastructure of the larva of Toxocara cati, but overall, it appears very similar to that of T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.03.002DOI Listing

Seroprevalence of human toxocarosis in Europe: A review and meta-analysis.

Adv Parasitol 2020 10;109:375-418. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Medical Parasitology, Center of Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Toxocarosis is distributed worldwide and represents the most prevalent zoonotic helminth infection in industrialized countries, thereby posing a substantial risk for public health. Thus, toxocarosis is one of CDC's Neglected Parasitic Infections that has been targeted for public health action. This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes Toxocara seroprevalence in general populations from Europe, populations suspected of Toxocara infection and defined risk groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.014DOI Listing
February 2020

Seroprevalence Brazil.

Adv Parasitol 2020 31;109:357-374. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Departamento de Saúde Coletiva, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.

This chapter presents an overview of the seroprevalence of toxocariasis in Brazil and discusses how this zoonosis is studied, diagnosed, and treated in the Brazilian population. Toxocariasis in humans has a high prevalence in several regions of Brazil; however, this disease is neglected because of lack of knowledge, non-specific clinical signs, and difficult diagnosis. Most studies conducted in Brazil have estimated the prevalence of toxocariasis, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.013DOI Listing
January 2020

Toxocara: Seroprevalence in Mexico.

Adv Parasitol 2020 5;109:341-355. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Laboratorio de Parasitología Experimental del Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Mexico City, Mexico. Electronic address:

In Mexico, toxocariasis, like some other parasitosis in humans, is not a disease of conventional surveillance or immediate notification. Seroprevalence studies are scarce, six dealing with paediatric populations and eight dealing with adults; the reports were only from four states in Mexico. There were 1596 children, and the seroprevalence was 13. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.012DOI Listing
February 2020

Toxocara seroprevalence in the USA and its impact for individuals and society.

Adv Parasitol 2020 21;109:317-339. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Children's of Mississippi, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, United States.

Toxocara species are intestinal helminths of dogs and cats, the larval stages of which may infect humans and cause severe neural, ocular and visceral larva migrans disease. Such cases of severe overt disease represent only a small fraction of the of the US population who have been exposed and infected with Toxocara, subsequently developing IgG antibodies to the larvae. The true impact of exposure to Toxocara in this large group of Americans remains uncertain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.035DOI Listing
February 2020

Toxocara: Protecting pets and improving the lives of people.

Adv Parasitol 2020 20;109:3-16. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States.

Toxocara sp. are zoonotic parasitic roundworms that cause infection and morbidity in both developed and developing countries. In humans, infection is thought to be most common in children, particularly those living in poverty, and usually results from consumption of soil contaminated with parasite eggs deposited by dog or cat faeces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.001DOI Listing
February 2020

Toxocara seroprevalence in Canada-Climate, environment and culture.

Adv Parasitol 2020 26;109:291-316. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

School of Health and Life Sciences, Federation University Australia, Berwick, VIC, Australia.

Human infection with larvae of canine and feline roundworms belonging to the genus Toxocara can lead to devastating visceral, neural or ocular larvae migrans disease. However, such overt disease represents a fraction of cases. Far more common is covert toxocariasis, a less severe, but clinically symptomatic form of disease, and those who are exposed to infective larvae and seroconvert, but appear to be asymptomatic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.03.003DOI Listing

Global and regional seroprevalence estimates for human toxocariasis: A call for action.

Adv Parasitol 2020 25;109:275-290. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. Electronic address:

Human toxocariasis is a parasitic disease transmitted usually from dogs and/or cats that are infected with Toxocara species, and can be associated with a range of allergic, neurological and/or visual disorders. Recent epidemiological research has estimated that ~1.4 billion people worldwide, particularly in subtropical and tropical regions, are infected with, or exposed to Toxocara species, indicating that human toxocariasis is a neglected tropical disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.011DOI Listing

Neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric effects of toxocariasis.

Adv Parasitol 2020 31;109:261-272. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, United States; The Neuroscience Centre, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, United States.

Caused by the neuroinvasive nematodes Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati, human toxocariasis has a worldwide distribution with seroprevalence in humans associated with low socioeconomic status and low educational attainment. Third-stage Toxocara larvae can invade human tissues, including the brain and spine, where they can result in encephalitis, meningitis, and inflammation. Toxocara infection in animal models has been associated with cognitive and behavioural changes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.009DOI Listing
January 2020

Pathogenesis of cerebral toxocariasis and neurodegenerative diseases.

Authors:
Chia-Kwung Fan

Adv Parasitol 2020 5;109:233-259. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Department of Molecular Parasitology and Tropical Diseases, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Research Center of International Tropical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Tropical Medicine Division, International PhD Program in Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address:

Toxocara canis belongs to one of zoonotic parasites that commonly infects canines worldwide, and its eggs in host faeces may contaminate the food, water, soil and their fur as well as the larvae entrapped in the granuloma can infect paratenic hosts including mice and humans. Survivability of T. canis embryonated eggs under moist, cool conditions may be as long as 2-4 years or more. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.01.008DOI Listing
February 2020