1,147 results match your criteria Advances in Neonatal Care[Journal]


NANN Is Here for You During These Challenging Times.

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Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jun;20(3):186

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000771DOI Listing

The Importance of Information: Why Associations Have Journals.

Authors:
Catherine Witt

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jun;20(3):181-182

Loretto Heights School of Nursing Regis University Denver, Colorado.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000756DOI Listing

Delayed Diagnosis in Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula: Case Study.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

PIPER (Retrieval Team) (Dr Scott) and Butterfly (Surgical NICU) (Mss Hawley and Brooks), Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: Timely identification of esophageal atresia is challenging. Diagnosis may be suspected antenatally with a combination of polyhydramnios, associated with a small or absent stomach bubble or other anomalies. Esophageal atresia can be suspected postnatally in the presence of tachypnea, increased oral secretions, and an inability to advance an orogastric tube. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000763DOI Listing

Physiological Stability in Very Preterm Infants During Skin-to-Skin Contact as Assessed by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden (Drs Blomqvist, Karlsson, Sindelar, and Ågren); Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (Drs Blomqvist, Karlsson, Sindelar, and Ågren); and Astrid Lindgrens Children Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden (Dr Dawit).

Background: Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) has been demonstrated to allow adequate thermal stability in high-technology settings with extremely preterm infants, while other aspects on how SSC influences basic physiological parameters have been less extensively investigated.

Purpose: To evaluate physiological stability during SSC and incubator care in a group of preterm infants born at a gestational age (GA) of 32 weeks or less and receiving respiratory support.

Methods: Descriptive, observational study including 10 preterm infants (GA 22-32 weeks, postnatal age 2-48 days) were evaluated during SSC compared with flanking time periods in the incubator. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000764DOI Listing

The Use of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

Authors:
Ashley M Novotny

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital Colorado-Colorado Springs, and Regis University in Denver, Colorado.

Background: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a complex congenital defect of the diaphragm that allows abdominal contents to herniate into the chest cavity, altering pulmonary development, and leading to pulmonary hypoplasia and hypertension. Patient presentation is variable in severity, making management difficult. Many common management strategies have improved the survival rate of infants with CDH, including gentle ventilation and permissive hypercapnia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000753DOI Listing

Conceptually Redefining Neonatal Palliative Care.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jun;20(3):187-195

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia (Dr Kain); and Molloy College, New York City, New York (Ms Chin).

Background: First defined in 2002 by Catlin and Carter, neonatal palliative care (NPC) is a relatively new model of care in neonatal pediatrics, first appearing in the medical literature in the early 1980s.

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to suggest a conceptual definition of NPC that encompasses all the essential concepts as a way of moving NPC forward by having a consistent approach.

Methods: Following a review of the NPC literature, a thematic analysis as a method for identifying, analyzing, and interpreting patterns of meaning in the definitions ("themes") within the literature was undertaken. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000731DOI Listing

Decreasing Admissions to the NICU: An Official Transition Bed for Neonates.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, University of Florida Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida (Drs Baker and Alissa); and College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (Dr Parker).

Background: Evidence supports the need to decrease healthcare costs. One approach may be minimizing use of low-value care by reducing the number of unnecessary neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions through the use of official neonatal transition beds.

Purpose: To evaluate whether transition beds decrease unnecessary NICU admissions and estimate the cost savings of this practice change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000765DOI Listing

Close to Home: Perinatal Palliative Care in a Community Hospital.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jun;20(3):196-203

Mary Washington Hospital, Fredericksburg, Virginia (Ms Ziegler); and PerinatalHospice.org, St Paul, Minnesota (Ms Kuebelbeck).

Background: Advances in prenatal testing and diagnosis have resulted in more parents learning during pregnancy that their child may die before or shortly after birth. These advances in testing and diagnosis have also resulted in more parents choosing, despite the diagnosis, to continue their pregnancies and pursue a palliative approach to their infant's short life. Perinatal hospice and palliative care is a growing model of care developed in response to these parents' previously unmet needs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000732DOI Listing

Implementation of a Perinatal Hospice Program.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jun;20(3):223-228

Neonatology, Nebraska Medicine, Omaha (Dr Falke); School of Nursing, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska (Drs Falke and Rubarth); and NNP Coordinator, Creighton University, College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska (Dr Rubarth).

Background: In 2017, the Nebraska Unicameral passed legislative bill 506, which required physicians to inform patients carrying fetuses diagnosed with a life-limiting anomaly of the option to enroll in a comprehensive perinatal hospice program. The bill also required the Department of Health & Human Services to provide information about statewide hospice programs. Families enrolled in hospice programs are better prepared for the birth and death of their child. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000755DOI Listing

The Evolution of an Interdisciplinary Developmental Round in a Surgical Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Australasian NIDCAP Training Centre (Ms Griffiths, Ms James-Nunez, Ms Spence, Dr Crowle, Ms Pettigrew, Dr Loughran-Fowlds), Grace Centre for Newborn Intensive Care (Ms Spence, Dr Loughran-Fowlds, Ms Griffiths, Ms James-Nunez and Dr Crowle) and Speech Pathology Department (Ms Pettigrew), The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: Developmentally supportive environments are known to improve medical outcomes for hospitalized neonates and are considered the overarching philosophy for practice in the neonatal setting. Developmental rounds are a strategy incorporated by multidisciplinary teams to support development within and beyond the neonatal unit. Typically, they consist of bedside consultations and individualized developmentally supportive recommendations for families and clinicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000741DOI Listing

Patterns of Parenting Confidence Among Infants With Medical Complexity: A Mixed-Methods Analysis.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

National Clinical Scholars Program, Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, University of Michigan, and Department of Systems, Populations, and Leadership, School of Nursing, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor (Dr Vance); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill (Dr Knafl); and Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Nursing, and School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (Dr Brandon).

Background: Parenting confidence is an important factor in fostering optimal health and development of infants with medical complexity. However, our understanding of how parents of medically complex infants describe development of confidence is limited. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to describe the nature and development of parenting confidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000754DOI Listing

Inpatient Unit Leaders' Perspectives on Parent Engagement in Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care: A Secondary, Qualitative Analysis.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, University of Michigan, and Department of Systems, Populations, and Leadership, School of Nursing, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor (Dr Vance); and Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Nursing, and School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Docherty and Brandon).

Background: Hospital unit leaders help set the unit's priorities and are responsible for guiding the unit mission and philosophy of care; however, the perspective of leaders in facilitating parent engagement within intensive care units is limited.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how medical and nursing unit leaders facilitate parent engagement in intensive care settings.

Methods: Qualitative secondary analysis of 16 semistructured interviews of unit leadership (medical directors and nurse managers). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000736DOI Listing

Atrial Flutter-Unique Arrhythmia in Neonatal Population, Presentation of 3 Cases.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Rheumatology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

Background: Atrial flutter (AFL) is an uncommon arrhythmia in the pediatric population. It is defined as fast ordered atrial depolarization (about 250-500 beats/min). It occurs mainly in children with congenital heart defects; however, it may also manifest in fetuses and infants with an anatomically healthy heart. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000737DOI Listing

NICU Parent Preferences for Stakeholder Engagement in Research.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson (Dr Quinn); and University of South Florida College of Nursing, Tampa (Dr Menon).

Background: Engagement of parents as stakeholders in the research process can help ensure that interventions are aligned with their needs and experiences, but little is known about their preferences for research collaboration.

Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative, exploratory study was to explore former neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) parents' attitudes toward engagement as parent collaborators and identify potential barriers and facilitators to parent collaboration in research.

Methods: Three focus groups and 3 interviews were conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000733DOI Listing

Accuracy of Transcutaneous Bilirubin Versus Serum Bilirubin Measurement in Preterm Infants Receiving Phototherapy: A Systematic Review.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

University Hospital Galway, Ireland (Ms Hynes); School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland (Drs Moore, Patton, and Nugent and Mr O'Connor).

Background: Jaundice is a common condition among preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Total serum bilirubin (TSB) offers a gold standard tool for measurement, but blood sampling can be costly, time-consuming, and not without risks of infection and pain. Transcutaneous bilimeter (TcB) allows for noninvasive assessment of bilirubin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000738DOI Listing

Can Procalcitonin Improve Antibiotic Stewardship for Late-Onset Sepsis Evaluations in Neonates?

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing (Dr Gareau-Terrell); and Texas Tech Health Science Center, Lubbock (Dr Branham).

Background: Procalcitonin (PCT) use is not widespread in the neonatal population during late-onset sepsis evaluations. Minimal data exist on appropriate PCT cutoff levels to treat with antibiotics for neonatal sepsis. New guidelines were implemented in select central Texas neonatal intensive care units for late-onset sepsis (infants older than 72 hours) with recommended PCT cutoff levels for antibiotic administration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000761DOI Listing

NICU Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding 2-Month Immunizations.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr 20. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

College of Nursing, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah.

Background: Nurses are an integral part of the healthcare team. Parents rely on nurses for information regarding the plan of care for their child. Medically stable infants under supervision in a newborn intensive care unit (NICU) can and should be immunized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000735DOI Listing

Safety, Feasibility, and Effectiveness of Weighted Blankets in the Care of Infants With Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Mar 31. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, TriHealth, Good Samaritan Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio (Mss Summe and Eichel); and TriHealth, Cincinnati, Ohio (Dr Baker).

Background: Nurses are caring for increasing numbers of infants diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). The recommended initial line of treatment to alleviate NAS symptoms includes nonpharmacologic interventions; however, there is little rigorous evidence on the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic interventions.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of weighted blankets in the care of NAS infants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000724DOI Listing

Goals of Parents Whose Infant Is in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: An Explorative Study.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Mar 31. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Paediatrics (Drs Fucile and Dow) and School of Rehabilitation Therapy (Dr Fucile, Ms Samson, and Mr Rockley), Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Background: The aim of many neonatal intensive care units (NICU) today is to promote a family-centered practice that addresses parental concerns and needs. However, the specific goals of parents are often unaddressed by the healthcare team. The aim of this study was to understand the goals of parents whose infant was in the NICU to enhance collaboration and communication between parents and health professionals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000725DOI Listing

Using Simulation in Training Pediatric Residents on Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Scoring: An Experimental Study.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Mar 31. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Background: Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is characterized by significant physiological and behavioral signs involving multiple-organ systems in neonates following a prenatal exposure to opioids and other nonopioid drugs. Neonatal abstinence syndrome can result in serious morbidity, and even death, if unrecognized and untreated. The purpose of this study was to develop a simulation model of a standard video training of the Finnegan Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System (FNAS) and investigate the perceptions of comfort and competency of pediatric residents undergoing video or simulation training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000713DOI Listing

Promoting Parent Partnership in Developmentally Supportive Care for Infants in the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):161-170

Nemours Cardiac Center (Mss Klug and Hall and Drs Hehir and Sood), Department of Patient and Family Services (Ms Delaplane), Department of Child Life (Ms Meehan), Department of Therapeutic and Rehabilitative Services (Mss Negrin, Russell, and Hamilton and Dr Mieczkowski), and Division of Behavioral Health (Dr Sood), Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware; and Department of Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Drs Hehir and Sood).

Background: Limited opportunities for parents to care for their critically ill infant after cardiac surgery can lead to parental unpreparedness and distress.

Purpose: This project aimed to create and test a bedside visual tool to increase parent partnership in developmentally supportive infant care after cardiac surgery.

Methods: The Care Partnership Pyramid was created by a multidisciplinary team and incorporated feedback from nurses and parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000679DOI Listing

Use of Palliative Care Consultation Services for Infants With Life-Threatening Conditions in a Metropolitan Hospital.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):136-141

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Drs McLaughlin, Song, and Piazza); Center for Nursing Excellence in Palliative Care (Dr Song) and Center for Data Science (Dr Hertzberg), Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia; and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, Georgia (Dr Piazza).

Background: Palliative care is becoming an important component for infants with life-limiting or life-threatening conditions and their families. Yet palliative care practices appear to be inconsistent and sporadically used for infants.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the use of an established pediatric palliative care team for seriously ill infants in a metropolitan hospital. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000698DOI Listing

Parents' Experiences About Support Following Stillbirth and Neonatal Death.

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Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):E17-E18

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000716DOI Listing

Looking to the Future-Challenges and Opportunities: Erratum.

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Adv Neonatal Care 2020 04;20(2):150

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000719DOI Listing

NANN's Guideline for Safe Sleep Executive Summary.

Authors:
Gail A Bagwell

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):108

Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000722DOI Listing

Engage With NANN This Year as We Celebrate the Year of the Nurse!

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Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):105-107

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000728DOI Listing

What Keeps Neonatal Nurses Up at Night and What Gets Them Up in the Morning?

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Feb 28. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Nursing Research (Dr Walden and Mr Lovenstein) and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (Mr Janssen), Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock; and College of Nursing, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (Dr Walden).

Background: Occupational stress in neonatal nursing is a significant professional concern. Prolonged exposure to morally distressing patient care experiences and other healthcare issues may lead to worry among nurses. When worry becomes excessive, nurses and advanced practice registered nurses may lose joy that gives meaning to their work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000723DOI Listing
February 2020

A Behavioral Epigenetics Model to Predict Oral Feeding Skills in Preterm Infants.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Feb 28. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Health Promotion, Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois (Drs Griffith and Janusek); Nursing Research, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Dr White-Traut); and Department of Women, Children, and Family Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago (Dr White-Traut).

Background: Preterm infants experience a multitude of prenatal and postnatal stressors, resulting in cumulative stress exposure, which may jeopardize the timely attainment of developmental milestones, such as achieving oral feeding. Up to 70% of preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit experience challenges while initiating oral feeding. Oral feeding skills require intact neurobehavioral development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000720DOI Listing
February 2020

Estimates of Preterm Infants' Breastfeeding Transfer Volumes Are Not Reliably Accurate.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Feb 28. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

School of Molecular Sciences, Faculty of Science (Dr Perrella and Prof Geddes), School of Mathematics and Statistics, Faculty of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences (Dr Rea), School of Population and Global Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (Dr Murray), and Centre for Neonatal Research and Education, School of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (Prof Simmer), The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia; and Neonatology Clinical Care Unit, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Subiaco, Western Australia (Ms Nancarrow and Prof Simmer).

Background: Adequate human milk nutrition is critical for infant growth and neurodevelopment; however, low milk transfer volumes are common when establishing preterm breastfeeding. Despite clinical assessments of milk transfer volumes at the breast being inaccurate, measurement of feed volume via test weighing is rarely carried out either routinely or in cases where infant weight gain is inadequate.

Purpose: To assess the accuracy of the Preterm Breastfeeding Assessment Tool (PBAT) in determining transfer volumes and examine factors associated with PBAT accuracy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000721DOI Listing
February 2020

Comparative Evaluation of Parental Stress Experiences Up to 2 to 3 Years After Preterm and Term Birth.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Feb 26. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

Applied Research and Development Midwifery, Department of Health Professions, University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland (Ms Schuetz Haemmerli and Dr Cignacco); Department of Public Health, Institute of Nursing Science, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland (Ms Schuetz Haemmerli and Dr Cignacco); University Children's Hospital, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland (Ms Schuetz Haemmerli); Department of Psychology, The University of Warwick, Coventry, England (Dr Lemola); Department of Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland (Dr Lemola); Professor Emerita, School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (Dr Holditch-Davis).

Background: Parenting stress after preterm birth (PTB) has negative long-term effects on parenting. Research about parental experiences after PTB and on parenting stress in early childhood has focused on mothers.

Purpose: To compare parenting stress between mothers and fathers 2 to 3 years after PTB and full-term birth (FTB) and to explore their memories about their stress experience, especially after PTB. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000714DOI Listing
February 2020

Preparing Nurses for Palliative Care in the NICU.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):142-150

Division of Nursing Research and Education, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (Dr Ferrell); Medical City McKinney, McKinney, Texas (Dr Thaxton); ELNEC Faculty, City of Hope, Duarte, California (Dr Thaxton); and Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters, Norfolk, Virginia (Ms Murphy).

Background: Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses require knowledge and skill to meet the unique needs of infants and families. Increasingly, principles of palliative care are being integrated into the NICU setting to improve the quality of care.

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to describe the efforts of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) project and its Pediatric Curriculum, which began in 2003 to provide this education, and to also describe efforts by nurses to implement the training into their practice settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000705DOI Listing

Neonatal Nurses' Self-reported Practices, Knowledge, and Attitudes Toward Use of Maternal Voice for Preterm Infants.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jan 30. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs, and Hartford Hospital, Connecticut (Ms Williamson); and School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (Dr McGrath).

Background/significance: Infants born extremely premature (<1500 g) often experience lengthy stays in the challenging environment of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) separated from their parents.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' knowledge, attitude, and use of maternal voice as a therapeutic intervention for preterm infants in the NICU.

Methods: Neonatal nurses (n = 117) completed an online survey about the use of maternal voice in their individual units. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000715DOI Listing
January 2020

Gay Fatherhood in the NICU: Supporting the "Gayby" Boom.

Authors:
Rickey Logan

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jan 30. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Background: With advances in reproductive health, gay males are increasingly given the opportunity to reproduce. It is not a common occurrence for infants of gay male fathers to enter the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU); however, this may change and should be acknowledged.

Purpose: To give insight into the barriers, perspectives, and stresses of gay male caregivers (families) in their time spent in the NICU and to offer recommendations as to how better to serve them and their families. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000712DOI Listing
January 2020

A Cross-sectional Study of Group B Streptococcus-Associated Sepsis, Coinfections, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile in Neonates in Pakistan.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jan 27. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Institute of Microbiology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan (Ms Asghar and Drs Mahmood and Arshad); and Institute of Pharmacy, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan (Dr Khan).

Background: Neonatal sepsis is a leading cause of morbidity and early-life mortality worldwide, and previous data have reported the highest neonatal mortality rate in Pakistan.

Purpose: The present study aimed to decipher the prevalence of group B Streptococcus (GBS)-associated sepsis, coinfections, and antibiotic susceptibility of isolated microbes in neonates.

Methods: Blood samples of 100 cases of neonatal sepsis were subcultured on blood agar, GBS agar, and MacConkey agar for isolation of GBS and suspected microbes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000701DOI Listing
January 2020

Perinatal Counseling Following a Diagnosis of Trisomy 13 or 18: Incorporating the Facts, Parental Values, and Maintaining Choices.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jun;20(3):204-215

Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Background: Families with a prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 13 or 18 are told many things, some true and some myths. They present with differing choices on how to proceed that may or may not be completely informed.

Purpose: To provide the prenatal counselor with a review of the pertinent obstetrical and neonatal outcome data and ethical discussion to help them in supporting families with the correct information for counseling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000704DOI Listing

Early for Everyone: Reconceptualizing Palliative Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):109-117

The University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson.

Background: Palliative care (PC) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is often provided exclusively to infants expected to die. Standards of care support providing PC early after diagnosis with any condition likely to impact quality of life.

Purpose: To determine the state of early PC practice across populations to derive elements of early PC applicable to neonates and their families and demonstrate their application in practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000707DOI Listing

Influence of NICU Nurse Education on Intention to Support Lactation Using Tailored Techniques: A Pilot Study.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jan 24. Epub 2020 Jan 24.

Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (Dr Blatz and Ms Huston); Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (Dr Blatz); and Nursing Research, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Ohio, and College of Nursing, Kent State University, Ohio (Dr Anthony).

Background: Preterm infants' outcomes improve when fed their mothers' milk. Low percentages of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses support mothers facing barriers to establishing and sustaining adequate milk supplies. Nurses' motivations and attitudes are instrumental, but understudied, factors in their intention to promote maternal lactation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000702DOI Listing
January 2020

Congratulations to Our Award Winners!

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Adv Neonatal Care 2020 02;20(1):9-13

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000710DOI Listing
February 2020

Women and Infants in the Deep South Receiving Perinatal and Neonatal Palliative and Supportive Care Services.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jun;20(3):216-222

College of Nursing, University of South Alabama, Mobile (Drs Davis and Harmon and Ms Baker Urquhart); and USA Health Children's & Women's Hospital, Mobile, Alabama (Drs Moore and Harmon and Ms Sprague).

Background: While women in the Deep South area of the United States have higher rates of maternal and infant mortality, palliative and supportive care programs are lacking. Additionally, few studies have detailed referral triggers that are specific to the mother, infant, or pregnancy for inclusion in perinatal and neonatal palliative and supportive care programs.

Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective, descriptive study was to examine the sociodemographic factors and referral triggers for perinatal-neonatal palliative and supportive care services for women enrolled in a newly developed perinatal-neonatal palliative and supportive care program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000706DOI Listing

Is This My Home? A Palliative Care Journey Through Life and Death in the NICU: A Case Report.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):127-135

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora.

Background: With advancements in neonatology, patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are living in the hospital with complex life-limiting illnesses until their first birthday or beyond. As palliative care (PC) becomes a standard of care in neonatology, a level IV NICU developed an interdisciplinary PC team with the mission to ease the physical, mental, and moral distress of the patients, families, and staff. This case report highlights the teamwork and long-term palliative care and ultimately end-of-life care that an infant received by this dedicated NICU palliative care team. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000697DOI Listing

Parents' Experiences About Support Following Stillbirth and Neonatal Death.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):151-160

Gynaecology and Obstetrics Unit, Hospital de Torrevieja, Alicante, Spain (Mr Camacho Ávila); Department of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Medicine, University of Almería, Spain (Drs Fernández Medina, Jiménez-López, Granero-Molina, Hernández-Padilla, and Fernández-Sola); Department of Nursing, University Católica de San Antonio, Murcia, Spain, and Gynaecology and Obstetrics Unit, Hospital de Torrevieja, Alicante, Spain (Dr Hernández Sánchez); and Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Temuco, Chile (Dr Fernández-Sola).

Background: Stillbirth and neonatal death are one of the most stressful life events, with negative outcomes for parents. Society does not recognize this type of loss, and parental grieving is particularly complicated and intense.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe and understand the experiences of parents in relation to professional and social support following stillbirth and neonatal death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000703DOI Listing

Vicarious Posttraumatic Growth in NICU Nurses.

Adv Neonatal Care 2019 Dec 24. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs.

Background: When posttraumatic growth occurs in clinicians as a result of their caring for patients and families who are traumatized, it is termed vicarious posttraumatic growth.

Purpose: (1) To determine the level of vicarious posttraumatic growth and the disruption of core beliefs in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses who have cared for critically ill infants and their families. (2) To explore those quantitative findings through nurses' qualitative descriptions of their growth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000689DOI Listing
December 2019

Predictors of Parental Presence in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jun;20(3):251-259

Emory University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia (Drs Head Zauche, Dunlop, and Mr Zauche); Augusta University School of Nursing (Dr Williams); and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Dunlop).

Background: Parental presence in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may affect preterm infants' developmental outcomes. However, few studies have described predictors of parental presence in the NICU.

Purpose: To identify sociodemographic, clinical, environmental, and maternal psychological factors that predict parent presence in the NICU. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000687DOI Listing

Correlation Between Heart Rate Characteristic Index Score and Severity of Brain Injury in Neonates With Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Jan 27. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital, Hollywood Florida (Dr Kayton); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr DeGrazia); Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr DeGrazia); Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr DeGrazia); Division of Neonatology, Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies, Orlando, Florida (Ms Smith and Dr Perez); Clinical Nursing College of Nursing, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (Dr Sharpe); and Division of Neonatology, University of Florida, Gainesville (Dr Weiss).

Background: Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains devastating for neonates despite widespread treatment with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). The heart rate characteristic (HRC) index score, a measure of heart rate variability, could prove useful in the management of neonates with HIE as new therapies emerge or when withdrawal-of-support decisions are being considered.

Purpose: The main purpose was to describe correlation between HRC index scores and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) severity of injury for neonates with HIE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000686DOI Listing
January 2020

The Phenomenon of Trombley-Brennan Terminal Tissue Injury in a Neonate: A Case Study.

Adv Neonatal Care 2020 Apr;20(2):171-175

Institute for Nursing, Northwell Health, Lake Success, New York (Dr Jacob); and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, North Shore University Hospital, Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York (Ms Grabher).

Background: Trombley-Brennan terminal tissue injury (TB-TTI), also known as skin failure, was first identified in 2009 among critically ill adults receiving palliative care. Identification of this skin injury can be misinterpreted as a pressure ulcer. However, this phenomenon is now accepted as an early sign of impending death among critically ill adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANC.0000000000000688DOI Listing