968 results match your criteria Advances in Neonatal Care[Journal]


Nurse Stressors and Satisfiers in the NICU.

Authors:
Elizabeth Fiske

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 21. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina.

Background: Working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be both rewarding and stressful. Stressors can outweigh satisfiers, leading to job dissatisfaction and turnover. Nurse retention remains a problem, particularly for nurses within the first year of employment. Read More

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Evaluation of Key Factors Impacting Feeding Safety in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Systematic Review.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 21. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

Nutrition and Dietetics Program, Department of Human Environmental Studies, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant (Ms Matus and Dr Logomarsino); Food and Nutrition Services, Beaumont Hospital-Royal Oak, Royal Oak, Michigan (Mss Matus and Bridges); and Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Health Professions, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark (Ms Bridges).

Background: Individualized feeding care plans and safe handling of milk (human or formula) are critical in promoting growth, immune function, and neurodevelopment in the preterm infant. Feeding errors and disruptions or limitations to feeding processes in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are associated with negative safety events. Feeding errors include contamination of milk and delivery of incorrect or expired milk and may result in adverse gastrointestinal illnesses. Read More

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THE UPWARD TREND OF MARIJUANA USE AMONG PREGNANT FEMALES.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 21. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

College of Nursing, University of Tennessee Knoxville; and Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters, Norfolk, Virginia.

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Mothers' Emotional Experiences Providing Care for Their Infants Within the Culture of an Iranian Neonatal Unit.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 21. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran (Drs Jabraeili and Hassankhani); Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran (Dr Negarandeh); Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tabriz, Iran (Dr Abbaszadeh); and School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas (Dr Cleveland).

Background: Each year, 5% to 8% of Iranian newborns require care in a neonatal unit (NU). Reasons for admission include prematurity, infection, and congenital anomalies. Little research has been conducted on the culture of Iranian NUs and the impact this has on mothers' emotional caregiving experiences. Read More

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Temperature and Humidity Associated With Artificial Ventilation in the Premature Infant: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 21. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina (Ms Ralphe); and College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia (Dr Dail).

Background: Approximately half of the 55,000 very low birth-weight infants (<1500 g) born in the United States each year develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Many etiologies have been associated with the development of BPD, including aberrant temperature/humidity levels of artificial ventilation.

Purpose: The purpose of this literature review is to explore what is known regarding inspired air temperature/humidity levels from artificial ventilation in very premature infants, focusing on what levels these infants actually receive, and what factors impact these levels. Read More

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Comparing N-PASS and NIPS: Improving Pain Measurement in the Neonate.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 8. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Neonatology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital (Drs Desai and Aucott), and; Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (Drs Frank and Silbert-Flagg), Baltimore, Maryland.

Background: Proper assessment of pain is essential to allow for safe and compassionate care of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) used in an urban level IV NICU addresses acute pain but may not adequately measure chronic neonatal pain.

Purpose: The purpose of this quality improvement study was to improve acute and chronic pain measurements for neonates in an NICU through implementation of the Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS). Read More

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Comparison of Neonatal Nursing Practices for Determining Feeding Tube Insertion Length and Verifying Gastric Placement With Current Best Evidence.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 8. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville (Dr Parker); NICU, UF Health Shands Hospital, Gainesville, Florida (Ms Withers); and NICU, UF Health Shands Children's Hospital, Gainesville, Florida (Ms Talaga).

Background: Oral-nasogastric feeding tubes (FTs) are often malpositioned, placing infants at risk for complications. Confusion exists regarding the accuracy of methods to determine FT insertion length and verify gastric FT placement, and it is unknown whether evidence-based methods are used by neonatal nurses.

Purpose: To compare individual and unit-based neonatal nursing practices regarding methods used to determine FT insertion length and verify gastric FT placement. Read More

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Development and Validation of Simulation-Based Procedural Checklists for Evaluation of Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Performance.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 8. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Boekelheide NICU, Sanford Children's Hospital, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Mss Jarding, Bjornson, and Ortman Brockmueller and Drs Hogden and Messier); Division of Neonatology and Department of Pediatrics (Dr Messier), and Department of Internal Medicine (Dr Kozmenko and Dr Hogden), University of South Dakota-Sanford School of Medicine, Vermillion; Parry Center for Clinical Skills and Simulation, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Dr Kozmenko); and University of Nevada Las Vegas School of Medicine, Las Vegas (Dr Simanton).

Background: Neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) procedural competence is essential. Procedural simulation provides opportunity to practice high-risk, low-frequency procedures and helps improve skill retention. A formal procedural simulation experience was created in an attempt to provide sufficient experience for NNPs. Read More

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June 2018
3 Reads

Evolution of Delivery Room Management for Meconium-Stained Infants: Recent Updates.

Authors:
Shilpi Chabra

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 8. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle.

Background: The approach to intrapartum and postnatal management of an infant born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) in the delivery room (DR) has changed several times over the last few decades, leading to confusion and anxiety among health care providers (nurses, nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, midwives, and physicians). This article provides state-of-the-art insight into the evidence or lack thereof for the changes in guidelines.

Purpose: To discuss the evidence for evolution of DR management of vigorous and nonvigorous infants born through any type of MSAF. Read More

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June 2018
1 Read

Introduction of Continuous Video EEG Monitoring into 2 Different NICU Models by Training Neonatal Nurses.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun 8. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Sections of Neurology (Drs Bello-Espinosa and Esser) and Neonatology (Drs Goswami, Amin and Howlett), Department of Pediatrics, and Departments of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences (Dr Buchhalter), Alberta Children's Hospital (Messrs Lind and Oliver), Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Foothills Medical Centre Calgary, Alberta, Canada (Dr Thomas); NICU, Foothills Hospital Calgary, Alberta, Canada (Ms Metcalfe); Department of Neurosciences (Ms Kozlik), and Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics (Dr Mohammad), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Background: Continuous video electroencephalographic (EEG) (cvEEG) monitoring is emerging as the standard of care for diagnosis and management of neonatal seizures. However, cvEEG is labor-intensive and the need to initiate and interpret studies on a 24-hour basis is a major limitation.

Purpose: This study aims at establishing consistency in monitoring of newborns admitted to 2 different neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) managed by the same neurocritical care team. Read More

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Provider Perceptions of Bubble Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Barriers to Implementation in a Level III Neonatal Unit in South India.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 May 31. Epub 2018 May 31.

Department of Pediatrics (Dr Atreya) and Division of Neonatology (Dr Narendran) Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; and Division of Neonatology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York (Dr Lorenz).

Background: Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) is a simple, safe, and cost-effective strategy to provide respiratory support to newborns with respiratory distress syndrome in resource-limited settings.

Purpose: To understand whether implementation of bCPAP, relative to other modes of respiratory support in the care of newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, increases positive attitudes about its potential for consistent and widespread use among providers in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) of lower middle-income countries.

Methods: Semistructured qualitative interviews with 14 healthcare providers, including 5 neonatal nurses, 2 respiratory therapists, 5 postgraduate trainees in pediatrics, and 2 attending physicians, were conducted at a level III NICU in south India where bCPAP had been in consistent use for 6 years. Read More

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The Extended Dwell Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Is an Alternative Method of NICU Intravenous Access.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 May 28. Epub 2018 May 28.

Primary Children's Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Group, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah (Dr Chenoweth); College of Nursing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Dr Guo); and Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah (Dr Chan).

Background: Establishing vascular access is a common neonatal intensive care unit procedure. The extended dwell peripheral intravenous (EPIV) catheter is a 6-cm and 8-cm silicone catheter for peripheral vein insertion, which is a newer vascular access device than peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheter. Extended dwell peripheral intravenous catheters have been widely used in adults but evidence in neonates is lacking. Read More

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Innovations and Challenges of Implementing a Glucose Gel Toolkit for Neonatal Hypoglycemia.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 May 24. Epub 2018 May 24.

Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal (Drs Hammer and Pohl and Ms Drury); Advocate BroMenn Medical Center, Normal, Illinois (Drs Hammer and Jacobs and Mss Kaufman and Drury); and School of Nursing, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington (Dr Jacobs).

Background: Transient neonatal hypoglycemia occurs most commonly in newborns who are small for gestational age, large for gestational age, infants of diabetic mothers, and late preterm infants. An exact blood glucose value has not been determined for neonatal hypoglycemia, and it is important to note that poor neurologic outcomes can occur if hypoglycemia is left untreated. Interventions that separate mothers and newborns, as well as use of formula to treat hypoglycemia, have the potential to disrupt exclusive breastfeeding. Read More

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Supports and Barriers to the Provision of Human Milk by Mothers of African American Preterm Infants.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):179-188

University of Maryland Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Baltimore (Dr LoVerde); University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Neonatology, Baltimore (Drs Falck and Hussey-Gardener); and The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (Dr Donohue).

Background: Mother's own milk (MOM) provides significant health benefits to very low birth-weight infants (VLBW, ≤1500 g). However, 60% of African American (AA) women initiate lactation, and less than 35% provide MOM 6 months following the birth of their infant. Previous research focuses on term infants and is not specific to AA mothers of VLBW infants. Read More

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Feeding Intervals in Premature Infants ≤1750 g: An Integrative Review.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):168-178

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Galway University Hospital, Ireland (Ms Binchy); School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, St Stephens Green, Dublin, Ireland (Drs Moore and Patton); and Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium (Dr Moore).

Background: The timely establishment of enteral feeds and a reduction in the number of feeding interruptions are key to achieving optimal nutrition in premature infants. Nutritional guidelines vary widely regarding feeding regimens and there is not a widely accepted consensus on the optimal feeding interval.

Purpose: To critically examine the evidence to determine whether there is a relationship to feeding intervals and feeding outcomes in premature infants. Read More

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Clinical Outcomes in Preterm Infants Following Institution of a Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping Practice Change.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):223-231

Rebecca Considine Research Institute (Mr McNinch), Akron Children's Hospital (Dr Fenton), Akron, Ohio; Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing (Drs Bieda, Dowling, and Damato), and Department of Neurosciences, School of Medicine (Dr Damato), Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

Background: Evidence supports a significant reduction in the incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in preterm infants receiving delayed umbilical cord clamping (DCC).

Purpose: This study evaluated clinical feasibility, efficacy, and safety outcomes in preterm infants (<36 weeks' gestational age) who received DCC following a practice change implementation intended to reduce the incidence of IVH.

Methods: Infants receiving DCC (45-60 seconds) were compared with a sample of infants receiving immediate umbilical cord clamping (<15 seconds) in a retrospective chart review (N = 354). Read More

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Staff Nurse Perceptions of Open-Pod and Single Family Room NICU Designs on Work Environment and Patient Care.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):189-198

Educational Development Department, Baptist Health Lexington, Lexington, Kentucky (Ms Winner-Stoltz); Nursing Administration, Baptist Health Lexington, and College of Education, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (Mr Lengerich); Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Baptist Health Lexington, Lexington, Kentucky (Mss Hench and O'Malley); Women's and Children's, Baptist Health Lexington, Lexington, Kentucky (Ms Kjelland); and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Franciscan Alliance, Indianapolis, Indiana (Ms Teal).

Background: Neonatal intensive care units have historically been constructed as open units or multiple-bed bays, but since the 1990s, the trend has been toward single family room (SFR) units. The SFR design has been found to promote family-centered care and to improve patient outcomes and safety. The impact of the SFR design NICU on staff, however, has been mixed. Read More

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Deepen Your Connection With NANN.

Authors:

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):167

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March 2018 Noteworthy News.

Authors:
Heather E Smith

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):165-166

One Patient Services, Raleigh, North Carolina.

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Variation in Neonate Swaddling Techniques.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 May 9. Epub 2018 May 9.

Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York, New Hyde Park (Mss Fletcher, Pham, and Li and Drs Papaioannou, Milanaik); Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (Dr Spinazzola); and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (Dr Bar).

Background: It is common practice for healthcare practitioners to swaddle infants in newborn nursery and neonatal intensive care unit settings. Despite the widespread use of this practice, the American Academy of Pediatrics neither bans nor recommends swaddling. To date, there has been no standard protocol developed for either healthcare professionals or parents to establish optimal swaddling techniques in terms of infant arm positioning, infant leg positioning, and tightness of wrap. Read More

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Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool-Bottle-Feeding (NeoEAT-Bottle-Feeding).

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):232-242

Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts (Drs Pados and Park); The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing (Dr Thoyre); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Center for Developmental Sciences (Dr Estrem); and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Department of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences (Dr McComish).

Background: Feeding difficulties are common in infancy. There are currently no valid and reliable parent-report measures to assess bottle-feeding in infants younger than 7 months. The Neonatal Eating Assessment Tool (NeoEAT)-Bottle-feeding has been developed and content validated. Read More

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Evidence Regarding the Use of Bubble Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in the Extremely Low Birth-Weight Infant: Benefits, Challenges, and Implications for Nursing Practice.

Authors:
Samantha Alessi

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):199-207

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Background: Gentle ventilation with optimal oxygenation is integral to prevention of chronic lung disease in the extremely low birth-weight (ELBW) infant. Various types of noninvasive ventilation are used in neonatal intensive care units worldwide. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) has been in use in newborn intensive care since 1975. Read More

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Fathers' Stress in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 May 9. Epub 2018 May 9.

Department of Paediatrics (Mr Noergaard and Drs Garne, Fenger-Gron, and Kofoed) and Health Services Research Unit (Dr Ammentorp), Lillebaelt Hospital, Kolding, Denmark; and Institute of Regional Health Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Background: Healthcare professionals in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) tend to focus attention on the mothers and the newborn infants. Thus, fathers may find it difficult to establish an optimal father-child relationship and their stress may increase and persist during hospitalization.

Purpose: To investigate the impact of a more father-friendly NICU on paternal stress and their participation in childcare. Read More

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An Observational Cohort Study Examining the Effect of the Duration of Skin-to-Skin Contact on the Physiological Parameters of the Neonate in a Neonatal Intensive Special Care Unit.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):208-214

University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Ms Jones and Dr Santamaria); and Newborn Intensive Special Care Unit, The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (Ms Jones).

Background: Focus on skin-to-skin contact (SSC) as a family-centered care intervention in Neonatal Intensive Special Care (NISC) Units continues to increase. Previously, SSC has been shown to improve neonatal physiological stability, support brain development, and promote bonding and attachment. Limited research exists investigating SSC duration and neonatal physiological responses. Read More

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June 2018
1 Read

Mindfulness-Based Neurodevelopmental Care: Impact on NICU Parent Stress and Infant Length of Stay; A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):E12-E22

Author Affiliation: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Miller Children's and Women's Hospital Long Beach, Long Beach, California.

Background/purpose: Experiences of premature birth and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalizations result in stress and family separation that have far-reaching implications. Prior studies of neonatal neurodevelopmental care show improved infant outcomes. Previous studies of mindfulness show improved stress and health outcomes in varied disease processes. Read More

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April 2018
2 Reads

Finding My Way: A Phenomenology of Fathering in the NICU.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):154-162

Berry College Division of Nursing, Mount Berry, Georgia (Dr Logan); and Texas A&M University College of Nursing, Bryan, Texas (Dr Dormire).

Background: Historically, the relationship between infant and mother in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has been the main focus of parenting research, leaving a gap in the literature regarding the paternal experience.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the lived experience of fathering an infant born at less than 28 weeks' gestation admitted to a level III NICU.

Methods: Seven fathers of premature infants (25-27 weeks' gestation) participated in a semistructured interview about the experience of becoming a father to a premature infant at least 1 to 2 weeks after the NICU admission. Read More

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April 2018
3 Reads

Exploring Parent Experience of Communication About Therapeutic Hypothermia in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):136-143

Departments of Pediatric Neurology (Dr Craig), Child Psychiatry (Dr Gerwin), and Pediatrics (Ms Bainter and Mr Evans), Maine Medical Center, Portland; and Department of Psychiatry, Family Health Centers of San Diego, San Diego, California (Dr James).

Background: The unique communication challenges faced by parents of infants undergoing therapeutic hypothermia have not been well characterized.

Purpose: To develop awareness of communication challenges experienced by families of infants treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted in a group setting with parents matched into groups according to the severity of the infant's presenting encephalopathy. Read More

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April 2018
1 Read

Changing Neonatal Nurses' Perceptions of Caring for Infants Experiencing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome and Their Mothers: An Evidenced-Based Practice Opportunity.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):128-135

Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas.

Background: Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are caring for an increasing number of infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). The literature identifies the need for education for NICU nurses on NAS including skills for interacting with the mother with substance use disorder.

Purpose: An evidence-based practice project was developed to offer an educational presentation targeting these topics to 206 NICU participants (93% registered nurses, 1% licensed vocational nurses, and 6% nursing assistants) at a level IV NICU. Read More

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April 2018
9 Reads

Fathers' Stress in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Systematic Review.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):105-120

College of Nursing, University of Missouri-St Louis (Ms Prouhet); Developmental and Behavioral Sciences, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri (Ms Gregory); School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Missouri-Kansas City (Dr Russell); and St Louis Children's Hospital Medical Library, St Louis, Missouri (Ms Yaeger).

Background: Admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is stressful for parents. Nurses often focus on maternal well-being and fail to acknowledge the stress of fathers. Research on fathers' psychological stress is limited. Read More

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April 2018
1 Read

Where You Are Born Really Does Matter: Why Birth Hospital and Quality of Care Contribute to Racial/Ethnic Disparities.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):81-82

PhD Candidate; Duke University School of Nursing Co-Editor; Advances in Neonatal Care Co-Editor; Advances in Neonatal Care

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April 2018
1 Read

Comparison of Placental and Neonatal Admission Complete Blood Cell Count and Blood Cultures.

Authors:
Desi M Newberry

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Jun;18(3):215-222

WakeMed, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Background: The utilization of placental blood for neonatal admission laboratory tests, specifically the complete blood cell (CBC) count and blood culture, has the potential to delay the onset of anemia of prematurity and intraventricular hemorrhage, frequency of blood transfusions and associated complications, and painful procedures related to laboratory sampling.

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of drawing neonatal admission laboratory tests from the placenta rather than the neonate and to compare CBC count and blood culture results.

Methods: All infants less than 35 weeks' gestational age and all term infants with a maternal history of chorioamnionitis or untreated, positive group B Streptococcus status were eligible to participate. Read More

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June 2018
1 Read

Comparison of Transcutaneous and Serum Bilirubin Measurements in Neonates 30 to 34 Weeks' Gestation Before, During, and After Phototherapy.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):144-153

WakeMed Hospitals, Raleigh, North Carolina (Drs Jnah and Newberry); and Omega Statistics, Murrieta, California (Ms Eisenbeisz).

Background: The use of noninvasive, transcutaneous bilirubin monitoring (TcB) as a jaundice screen in full-term infants is well established; however, there is a paucity of research evaluating the use of TcB in premature infants.

Purpose: To compare agreement and consistency of transcutaneous and serum bilirubin measurements in a multiracial premature infant population ranging from 30 to 34(Equation is included in full-text article.)weeks' gestation before, during, and after phototherapy. Read More

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April 2018
1 Read

Current Practices and Attitudes Regarding Use of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the NICU: Results From a Survey of Members of the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):88-97

Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, Bedminster, New Jersey (Ms Kayton); Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Program, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (Dr Timoney); Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Program, University of Missouri-Kansas City (Dr Vargo); AND Neonatology-Perinatal Medicine, Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (Dr Perez).

Background: Excessive supplemental oxygen exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be associated with oxygen-related toxicities, which can lead to negative clinical consequences. Use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) can be a successful strategy for avoiding hyperoxia in the NICU. iNO selectively produces pulmonary vasodilation and has been shown to improve oxygenation parameters across the spectrum of disease severity, from mild to very severe, in neonates with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. Read More

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April 2018
1 Read

2017 ANC Reviewers.

Authors:

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 02;18(1):79

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February 2018
2 Reads

What Is the Evidence for Use of a Supplemental Feeding Tube Device as an Alternative Supplemental Feeding Method for Breastfed Infants?

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Feb;18(1):31-37

School of Nursing, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven (Dr Penny); School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs (Drs Penny, Judge, and McGrath); Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford (Drs Brownell); and School of Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington (Dr Brownell).

Background: According to the Healthy People 2020 goals, the sustainability of breastfeeding duration rates within the United States has not been achieved. To increase these rates, it is important that women with breastfeeding difficulties receive the support needed to continue breastfeeding. When supplementation occurs, it is essential that the breastfeeding relationship be preserved. Read More

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February 2018
3 Reads

Complex Surgical Infants Benefit From Postdischarge Telemedicine Visits.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Feb;18(1):22-30

Ronald and Harriet Lassin Newborn/Infant Intensive Care Unit, Department of General, Thoracic, and Fetal Surgery (Mss Willard, Brown, and Masten), and Divisions of Neonatology (Drs Pouppirt, Lioy, and Chuo) and Otolaryngology (Mr Moran), The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Division of Neonatology, CHOP Newborn Care at Virtua, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Dr Brant); and The University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia (Drs Pouppirt, Lioy, and Chuo).

Background: Transition from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to home is challenging for caregivers of complex surgical infants. A prospective, observational cohort pilot study using telemedicine to improve transition was implemented in a quaternary level IV NICU.

Purpose: (1) To assess, identify, and resolve patient care concerns in the immediate postdischarge period. Read More

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February 2018
2 Reads

Basic Knowledge of Tracheoesophageal Fistula and Esophageal Atresia.

Authors:
Sura Lee

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Feb;18(1):14-21

Newborn/Infant Intensive Care Unit, Division of Pediatric General, Thoracic, and Fetal Surgery, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Background: Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) and esophageal atresia (EA) are rare anomalies in neonates. Up to 50% of neonates with TEF/EA will have Vertebral anomalies (V), Anal atresia (A), Cardiac anomalies (C), Tracheoesophageal fistula (T), Esophageal atresia (E), Renal anomalies (R), and Limb anomalies (L) (VACTERL) association, which has the potential to cause serious morbidity.

Purpose: Timely management of the neonate can greatly impact the infant's overall outcome. Read More

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February 2018
6 Reads

Nursing Assessment of Intra-abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in the Neonate.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Feb;18(1):7-13

Sanford Children's Specialty Clinic (Ms Reitsma) and Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Ms Schumacher).

Background: Abdominal compartment syndrome in the surgical neonate is a low-frequency, high-risk occurrence that if overlooked is often accompanied with long-term sequelae and sometimes death. The importance of early detection of signs and symptoms through expert nursing assessment cannot be overstated.

Purpose: To review the components of nursing assessment as it applies to detection of abdominal compartment syndrome in the surgical neonate and its relationship to the pathophysiology. Read More

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February 2018
2 Reads

NANN Celebrates Award Winners.

Authors:

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 02;18(1):3-6

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February 2018
3 Reads

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Exploring Nurses' Attitudes, Knowledge, and Practice.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):E3-E11

University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs (Ms Romisher and Dr Cong); and Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Hartford (Ms Hill).

Background: As opioid abuse increases in the United States, the rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) rises dramatically. Caring for infants with NAS and their families is a significant challenge to neonatal nurses.

Purpose: The purpose of this survey study was to explore attitudes and practice trends among nurses caring for infants with NAS. Read More

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April 2018
2 Reads

Associations Between Nurse-Guided Variables and Plasma Oxytocin Trajectories in Premature Infants During Initial Hospitalization.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Feb;18(1):E12-E23

N0B040 Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (Dr Weber); Nationwide Children's Hospital (Dr Weber); The Ohio State University College of Nursing, Columbus (Drs Harrison, Sinnott, and Steward); and The Ohio State University College of Public Health, Columbus (Dr Shoben).

Background: Oxytocin (OT) is a social hormone that may help researchers understand how nurse-guided interventions during initial infant hospitalization, such as supporting human milk expression, promoting comforting touch, and reducing exposure to stressors, affect preterm brain development.

Purpose: To determine whether factors related to human milk, touch, or stressor exposure are related to plasma OT trajectories in premature infants.

Methods: Plasma from 33 premature infants, born gestational ages 25 to (Equation is included in full-text article. Read More

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February 2018
5 Reads

Mesenteric Oxygenation Changes Associated With Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Pneumoperitoneum After Multiple Blood Transfusions: A Case Report.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Apr;18(2):121-127

Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing, College of Nursing, Augusta University, Georgia (Dr Marin); and University of Connecticut Health Science Center, Farmington, and Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, Connecticut (Dr Moore).

Background: The multifactorial pathology and broad clinical presentation of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) development in premature infants make prediction of disease onset extremely challenging. Over the past decade, packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions have been temporally linked to the development of NEC in severely anemic preterm infants, although this issue is highly controversial.

Purpose: In this case study, we describe events of an extremely low birth-weight infant who developed NEC complicated by pneumoperitoneum after receiving multiple PRBC transfusions. Read More

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April 2018
8 Reads

Expressing Human Milk in the NICU: Coping Mechanisms and Challenges Shape the Complex Experience of Closeness and Separation.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Feb;18(1):38-48

Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Ms Bujold and Dr Feeley); Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Dr Feeley and Ms Cinquino); and Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland (Dr Axelin).

Background: Human milk has multiple benefits for human health; however, rates of infants receiving human milk at discharge in Canadian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are far below recommendations of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative supported by the Canadian Pediatric Association. Mothers of infants requiring NICU care usually need to express their milk, especially mothers of premature infants, since for some time their infant is unable to feed directly at the breast. Expressing human milk for an extended period can be challenging for mothers. Read More

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February 2018
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The Surgical Neonate.

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Adv Neonatal Care 2018 02;18(1):1-2

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February 2018
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Preterm Stress Behaviors, Autonomic Indices, and Maternal Perceptions of Infant Colic.

Adv Neonatal Care 2018 Feb;18(1):49-57

Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital and Department of Pediatrics, Penn State Hershey, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania (Drs Gardner and Doheny); Stabler Department of Nursing, York College of Pennsylvania, York (Dr Adkins); Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Management, Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Hart); and Department of Neural and Behavioral Sciences, Penn State Hershey, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania (Drs Travagli and Doheny).

Background: While biological and behavioral stress response systems are intact in early gestation, preterm infants' behaviors are often more subtle and difficult to interpret compared with full-term infants. They are also more vulnerable for regulatory issues (ie, colic) that are known to impact caregiver-infant interactions. Biobehavioral measures such as behavioral responsivity and heart rate variability (HRV), particularly cardiac vagal tone, may help elucidate preterm infants' stress/regulatory systems. Read More

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February 2018
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