762 results match your criteria Advances In Parasitology[Journal]


Vertebrates as uninfected disseminators of helminth eggs and larvae.

Authors:
Neil J Morley

Adv Parasitol 2022 4;115:45-170. Epub 2021 Oct 4.

School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

The passive dispersal of non-mobile organisms by vertebrates (zoochory) is a common mechanism used to explain their often widespread distribution. Transport occurs either internally via the vertebrate digestive tract (endozoochory), or externally be adhering to skin, feathers or fur (ectozoochory), and its success is due to both physiological and ecological factors associated with the disseminating 'hosting' animal. Helminth eggs and larvae are generally non-mobile stages that are largely dependent on the movement of another animal, typically a host, for geographical dissemination. Read More

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Anthelmintic resistance in ruminants: challenges and solutions.

Adv Parasitol 2022 10;115:171-227. Epub 2022 Feb 10.

University of Naples Federico II, Unit of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, CREMOPAR, Napoli, Italy. Electronic address:

Anthelmintic resistance (AR) is a growing concern for effective parasite control in farmed ruminants globally. Combatting AR will require intensified and integrated research efforts in the development of innovative diagnostic tests to detect helminth infections and AR, sustainable anthelmintic treatment strategies and the development of complementary control approaches such as vaccination and plant-based control. It will also require a better understanding of socio-economic drivers of anthelmintic treatment decisions, in order to support a behavioural shift and develop targeted communication strategies that promote the uptake of evidence-based sustainable solutions. Read More

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An update on female and male genital schistosomiasis and a call to integrate efforts to escalate diagnosis, treatment and awareness in endemic and non-endemic settings: The time is now.

Adv Parasitol 2022 17;115:1-44. Epub 2022 Feb 17.

Institute of Health Research, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.

The last decades have brought important insight and updates in the diagnosis, management and immunopathology of female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) and male genital schistosomiasis (MGS). Despite sharing a common parasitic aetiological agent, FGS and MGS have typically been studied separately. Infection with Schistosoma haematobium manifests with gender-specific clinical manifestations and consequences of infection, albeit having a similar pathogenesis within the human genital tract. Read More

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Ups and downs of infections with the broad fish tapeworm Dibothriocephalus latus in Europe from 1900 to 2020: Part I.

Adv Parasitol 2021 13;114:75-166. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

Institute of Parasitology, Biology Centre, Czech Academy of Sciences, České Budějovice, Czech Republic.

The broad fish tapeworm, Dibothriocephalus latus (Diphyllobothriidea), is the most frequent causative agent of diphyllobothriosis, a fish-borne zoonosis, in Europe. Diphyllobothriosis is characterized by the transmission of D. latus larvae to humans via the consumption of raw, marinated, smoked or inadequately cooked fish products. Read More

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November 2021

Control and elimination of lymphatic filariasis in Oceania: Prevalence, geographical distribution, mass drug administration, and surveillance in Samoa, 1998-2017.

Adv Parasitol 2021 9;114:27-73. Epub 2021 Aug 9.

College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, and JCU WHO Collaborating Centre for Vector-Borne and Neglected Tropical Diseases, James Cook University, Cairns and Townsville, QLD, Australia.

Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a major public health problem globally and in the Pacific Region. The Global Programme to Eliminate LF has made great progress but LF is persistent and resurgent in some Pacific countries and territories. Samoa remains endemic for LF despite elimination efforts through multiple two-drug mass drug administrations (MDA) since 1965, including renewed elimination efforts started in 1999 under the Pacific Programme for Elimination of LF (PacELF). Read More

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November 2021

Ticks and tick-borne diseases of bovines in a smallholder livestock context: The Pakistani example.

Adv Parasitol 2021 9;114:167-244. Epub 2021 Oct 9.

Melbourne Veterinary School, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, VIC, Australia. Electronic address:

Ticks and tick-borne diseases (TTBDs) substantially affect the health and production of ruminants, particularly in resource-poor, small-scale farming systems worldwide. However, to date, there has been no critical appraisal of the current state of knowledge of TTBDs in such farming systems. In this article, we systematically reviewed the situation in Pakistan-as an example of a country that is highly reliant on agriculture to sustain its economy, particularly smallholder livestock farms, which are continually faced with challenges associated with TTBDs. Read More

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November 2021

Towards global control of parasitic diseases in the Covid-19 era: One Health and the future of multisectoral global health governance.

Adv Parasitol 2021 11;114:1-26. Epub 2021 Oct 11.

Heidelberg Institute of Global Health, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Center for Global Health Science and Security, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, United States. Electronic address:

Human parasitic infections-including malaria, and many neglected tropical diseases (NTDs)-have long represented a Gordian knot in global public health: ancient, persistent, and exceedingly difficult to control. With the coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic substantially interrupting control programmes worldwide, there are now mounting fears that decades of progress in controlling global parasitic infections will be undone. With Covid-19 moreover exposing deep vulnerabilities in the global health system, the current moment presents a watershed opportunity to plan future efforts to reduce the global morbidity and mortality associated with human parasitic infections. Read More

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October 2021

Plasmodium knowlesi, an infectious disease challenge for our times.

Authors:
Chris Drakeley

Adv Parasitol 2021 ;113:xiii-xvi

Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

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November 2021

Plasmodium knowlesi detection methods for human infections-Diagnosis and surveillance.

Adv Parasitol 2021 17;113:77-130. Epub 2021 Sep 17.

Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia; Infectious Diseases Society Sabah-Menzies School of Health Research Clinical Research Unit, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia.

Within the overlapping geographical ranges of P. knowlesi monkey hosts and vectors in Southeast Asia, an estimated 1.5 billion people are considered at risk of infection. Read More

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November 2021

Clinical management of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria.

Adv Parasitol 2021 1;113:45-76. Epub 2021 Sep 1.

Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia.

The zoonotic parasite Plasmodium knowlesi has emerged as an important cause of human malaria in parts of Southeast Asia. The parasite is indistinguishable by microscopy from the more benign P. malariae, but can result in high parasitaemias with multiorgan failure, and deaths have been reported. Read More

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November 2021

Epidemiology of the zoonotic malaria Plasmodium knowlesi in changing landscapes.

Adv Parasitol 2021 15;113:225-286. Epub 2021 Sep 15.

Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom; Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Within the past two decades, incidence of human cases of the zoonotic malaria Plasmodium knowlesi has increased markedly. P. knowlesi is now the most common cause of human malaria in Malaysia and threatens to undermine malaria control programmes across Southeast Asia. Read More

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November 2021

Molecular epidemiology and population genomics of Plasmodium knowlesi.

Adv Parasitol 2021 21;113:191-223. Epub 2021 Sep 21.

Malaria Research Centre, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Kota Samarahan, Sarawak, Malaysia; Department of Infection Biology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Molecular epidemiology has been central to uncovering P. knowlesi as an important cause of human malaria in Southeast Asia, and to understanding the complex nature of this zoonosis. Species-specific parasite detection and characterization of sequences were vital to show that P. Read More

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November 2021

The vectors of Plasmodium knowlesi and other simian malarias Southeast Asia: challenges in malaria elimination.

Adv Parasitol 2021 1;113:131-189. Epub 2021 Sep 1.

Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom.

Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria parasite of great public health concern has been reported from most countries in Southeast Asia and exported to various countries around the world. Currently P. knowlesi is the predominant species infecting humans in Malaysia. Read More

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November 2021

Knowlesi malaria: Human risk factors, clinical spectrum, and pathophysiology.

Adv Parasitol 2021 28;113:1-43. Epub 2021 Aug 28.

Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Plasmodium knowlesi is endemic across Southeast Asia, and is the commonest cause of zoonotic malaria. The spectrum of clinical disease from P. knowlesi infection ranges from asymptomatic infection, through to severe malaria and death. Read More

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November 2021

Survival of metazoan parasites in fish: Putting into context the protective immune responses of teleost fish.

Adv Parasitol 2021 29;112:77-132. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Veterinary Science for Health, Animal Production and Food Safety, University of Milan, Lodi, Milan, Italy.

Defence mechanisms of fish can be divided into specific and non-specific that act in concert and are often interdependent. Most fish in both wild and cultured populations are vulnerable to metazoan parasites. Endoparasitic helminths include several species of digeneans, cestodes, nematodes, and acanthocephalans. Read More

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September 2021

Macroscopic and microscopic imaging modalities for diagnosis and monitoring of urogenital schistosomiasis.

Adv Parasitol 2021 11;112:51-76. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Division of Urology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, DC, United States. Electronic address:

Urogenital schistosomiasis remains a major global challenge. Optimal management of this infection depends upon imaging-based assessment of sequelae. Although established imaging modalities such as ultrasonography, plain radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), narrow band imaging, and computerized tomography (CT) have been used to determine tissue involvement by urogenital schistosomiasis, newer refinements in associated technologies may lead to improvements in patient care. Read More

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September 2021

Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis: From parasite biology and immunology to diagnosis and control.

Adv Parasitol 2021 8;112:133-217. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

London Centre for Neglected Tropical Disease Research (LCNTDR), Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Infection with the pork tapeworm (Taenia solium) is responsible for a substantial global burden of disease, not only restricted to its impact on human health, but also resulting in a considerable economic burden to smallholder pig farmers due to pig cysticercosis infection. The life-cycle, parasitology and immunology of T. solium are complex, involving pigs (the intermediate host, harbouring the larval metacestode stage), humans (the definitive host, harbouring the adult tapeworm, in addition to acting as accidental intermediate hosts) and the environment (the source of infection with eggs/proglottids). Read More

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September 2021

Taking the strain out of onchocerciasis? A reanalysis of blindness and transmission data does not support the existence of a savannah blinding strain of onchocerciasis in West Africa.

Adv Parasitol 2021 3;112:1-50. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

London Centre for Neglected Tropical Disease Research (LCNTDR), Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Onchocerciasis (also known as 'river blindness'), is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused by the (Simulium-transmitted) filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus. The occurrence of 'blinding' (savannah) and non-blinding (forest) parasite strains and the existence of corresponding, locally adapted Onchocerca-Simulium complexes were postulated to explain greater blindness prevalence in savannah than in forest foci. As a result, the World Health Organization (WHO) Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP) focused anti-vectorial and anti-parasitic interventions in savannah endemic areas. Read More

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September 2021

Models in parasite and pathogen evolution: Genomic analysis reveals predominant clonality and progressive evolution at all evolutionary scales in parasitic protozoa, yeasts and bacteria.

Adv Parasitol 2021 11;111:75-117. Epub 2021 Jan 11.

Catedra Francisco Jose Ayala of Science, Technology, and Religion, University of Comillas, Madrid, Spain; 2 Locke Court, Irvine, CA, United States.

The predominant clonal evolution (PCE) model of pathogenic microorganisms postulates that the impact of genetic recombination in those pathogens' natural populations is not enough to erase a persistent phylogenetic signal at all evolutionary scales from microevolution till geological times in the whole ecogeographical range of the species considered. We have tested this model with a set of representative parasitic protozoa, yeasts and bacteria in the light of the most recent genomic data. All surveyed species, including those that were considered as highly recombining, exhibit similar PCE patterns above and under the species level, from macro- to micro-evolutionary scales (Russian doll pattern), suggesting gradual evolution. Read More

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September 2021

Insights gained from conducting a randomised controlled trial on Ivermectin-Albendazole against Trichuris trichiura in Côte d'Ivoire, Lao PDR and Pemba Island.

Adv Parasitol 2021 19;111:253-276. Epub 2020 Dec 19.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address:

There is only limited scientific literature on trial methodology, trial procedures and mitigation strategies to overcome challenges faced during clinical research taking place in resource constrained healthcare environments. Organisational, cultural, infrastructural and ethical challenges may vary between settings although conduct of clinical trials for the same disease (in our case soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections) share similar risks for implementation. We use the example of a phase III randomised controlled trial, conducted between 2018 and 2020 in Côte d'Ivoire, Lao PDR and Pemba Island (Tanzania), to share challenges faced and mitigation strategies to guide future planning of studies in similar settings. Read More

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September 2021

Advances in the discovery and development of anthelmintics by harnessing natural product scaffolds.

Adv Parasitol 2021 8;111:203-251. Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address:

Widespread resistance to currently-used anthelmintics represents a major obstacle to controlling parasitic nematodes of livestock animals. Given the reliance on anthelmintics in many control regimens, there is a need for the continued discovery and development of new nematocides. Enabling such a focus are: (i) the major chemical diversity of natural products; (ii) the availability of curated, drug-like extract-, fraction- and/or compound-libraries from natural sources; (iii) the utility and practicality of well-established whole-worm bioassays for Haemonchus contortus-an important parasitic nematodes of livestock-to screen natural product libraries; and (iv) the availability of advanced chromatographic (HPLC), spectroscopic (NMR) and spectrometric (MS) techniques for bioassay-guided fractionation and structural elucidation. Read More

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September 2021

HTLV-I and Strongyloides in Australia: The worm lurking beneath.

Adv Parasitol 2021 17;111:119-201. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Infectious Diseases Program, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Strongyloidiasis and HTLV-I (human T-lymphotropic virus-1) are important infections that are endemic in many countries around the world with an estimated 370 million infected with Strongyloides stercoralis alone, and 5-10 million with HTVL-I. Co-infections with these pathogens are associated with significant morbidity and can be fatal. HTLV-I infects T-cells thus causing dysregulation of the immune system which has been linked to dissemination and hyperinfection of S. Read More

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September 2021

Enterocytozoon bieneusi of animals-With an 'Australian twist'.

Adv Parasitol 2021 8;111:1-73. Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. Electronic address:

Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a microsporidian microorganism that causes intestinal disease in animals including humans. E. bieneusi is an obligate intracellular pathogen, typically causing severe or chronic diarrhoea, malabsorption and/or wasting. Read More

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September 2021

Preface: Development strategy of NIPD-CTDR in the new era.

Adv Parasitol 2020 ;110:xxiii-xxxii

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Diseases Control and Prevention; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

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The contributions and achievements on malaria control and forthcoming elimination in China over the past 70 years by NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 30;110:63-105. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Although the past decades have seen a remarkable decrease in malaria-caused mortality and morbidity, the infection remains a significant challenge to global health. In the battle against malaria, China has gained notable feat and achievement since the 1940s through the efforts of several generations. Notably, China has not recorded a single indigenous malaria case since August 2016. Read More

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Contribution of NIPD-CTDR to the parasitic diseases control and elimination in China: Memory of the 70th anniversary for NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 6;110:401-427. Epub 2020 May 6.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

China has achieved a great success in control and elimination of key parasitic diseases. In 2007, the elimination of lymphatic filariasis was verified by WHO. The schistosomiasis incidence and snail-distributed areas have reduced to the lowest level in the history. Read More

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Establishment and application of the National Parasitic Resource Center (NPRC) in China.

Adv Parasitol 2020 18;110:373-400. Epub 2020 May 18.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; School of Global Health, Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

The National Parasitic Resource Center (NPRC) was created in 2004. It is a first-level platform under the Basic Condition Platform Center of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China. The resource centre involves 21 depository institutions in 15 regions of the country, including human parasite and vector depository, animal parasite depository, plant nematode characteristic specimen library, medical insect characteristic specimen library, trematode model specimen library, parasite-vector/snail model specimen library, etc. Read More

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Construction and application of surveillance and response systems for parasitic diseases in China, led by NIPD-CTDR.

Adv Parasitol 2020 13;110:349-371. Epub 2020 May 13.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Parasitic diseases have been widely epidemic in China with a long history. Great endeavours made in past 70 years led to significant decrease in morbidity and mortablity caused by several major parasitic diseases, while challenges existed to eliminate parasitic diseases. Surveillance-response system has play a crucial role in identifying public health problems, ascertaining the distribution and epidemic dynamics, discovering outbreaks and epidemic anomalies, evaluating the effects of on-site intervention activities and identifying risk factors. Read More

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Epidemiological big data and analytical tools applied in the control programmes on parasitic diseases in China: NIPD's sustained contributions in 70 years.

Adv Parasitol 2020 30;110:319-347. Epub 2020 May 30.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

The analysis of epidemiological data has played an important role for the academic research carried out by the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, China CDC, since its foundation in 1950s. Those researches, e.g. Read More

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Control of taeniasis and cysticercosis in China.

Adv Parasitol 2020 18;110:289-317. Epub 2020 May 18.

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

National surveys suggest that the prevalence of taeniasis has considerably decreased in China, while reported cases indicated T. solium cysticercosis was historically highly endemic in northeastern, central and southwestern China. The high prevalence of taeniasis and cysticercosis there was driven by socio-ecological determinants. Read More

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