1,467 results match your criteria Advances In Nursing Science[Journal]


School Discipline Experiences Among Youth With Disabilities From the Perspective of School Nurses.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

California State University, Fullerton (Drs Fraley and Capp); and University of Massachusetts, Boston (Dr Aronowitz).

Youth with disabilities disproportionately experience harsh discipline. Exploring perspectives of behavior and discipline could increase inclusivity, yet school nurses' perspectives are unexplored. Using the Peace and Power Conceptual Model, school nurses' perspectives were explored employing secondary qualitative analysis using Thorne's typology of analytic expansion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000320DOI Listing

The Omnipresence of Cancer: Two Perspectives.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

Department of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland (Dr Zumstein-Shaha); Department of Health Sciences, City, University of London, London, England (Dr Cox); and Department of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Boston (Dr Fawcett).

This article aimed at describing the development of a theory of the experience of living with cancer. Secondary analysis of data from a series of studies yielded the concepts and propositions of the theory of the omnipresence of cancer. Theory construction was guided by Heidegger's ontology of dasein, whereas Newman's grand theory of health as expanding consciousness guided theory evolution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000314DOI Listing

The Contribution of Documentation Systems to How Nurses Understand Older People's Cognitive Function in Hospital.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada (Dr Moody); and School of Nursing, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (Drs Phinney, Boschma, and Baumbusch).

Nurses are central to the care of older people in hospital. One issue of particular importance to the experience and outcomes of hospitalized older people is their cognitive function. This article reports findings from a focused ethnographic study demonstrating how documentation systems-documents and the social processes surrounding their use-contribute to how nurses come to understand the cognitive function of hospitalized older people. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000315DOI Listing

The Post-caregiving Health Model: A Theoretical Framework for Understanding the Health of Former Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island (Drs Corey Magan and Bourbonniere); Department of Adult Nursing, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, Massachusetts (Drs McCurry and Sethares); and NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health, School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Drs Meghani and Hirschman).

Presently, there is a dearth of theoretical models to guide research on the population of former dementia caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of the Post-caregiving Health Model and its potential for generating a more nuanced understanding of the health of family caregivers following the death of a care recipient with dementia. The model highlights the impact of personal and environmental characteristics, appraisal, coping, and emotion on long-term health outcomes in this population and offers a viable framework for studying long-term health outcomes among caregivers following the care recipient's death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000316DOI Listing

The View From Anne's Shoulders: Preserving and Honoring the Legacy of Our Leaders.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing (Drs Gorman and Lusk); and Compass Health Center, Chicago, Illinois (Ms Clay).

In 2016, students and faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago recreated and celebrated the life of nursing leader, Anne Larson Zimmerman (1914-2003). Students conducted archival research and oral histories. Faculty transformed their findings into a script recreating Zimmerman's life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000291DOI Listing

Constructing Doctoral Leadership Scholarly Role Boundaries Through Intraprofessional Nursing Education.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr 1. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

University of Colorado College of Nursing, Aurora.

We conducted an intraprofessional education pilot in which students created DNP/PhD leadership parameters through naturalistic classroom experience. Agile, participatory, action research methodology framed a project spanning 3 semesters. Students' multiple ways of knowing influenced a dynamic cycle of noticing, interpreting, acting, and reflecting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000309DOI Listing

Men's Decision-Making to Become Nurses: Gendered Influences and Fit With Gender Role Conflict Theory.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr 1. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Chamberlain University, Downers Grove, Illinois (Dr O'Lynn); Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin (Dr O'Connor); University of Maine, Orono (Dr Herakova); and University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada (Dr Kellett).

Patriarchy has been offered as the foundational paradigm for gendered issues in nursing; however, operationalization of this paradigm in order to improve nursing workforce gender diversity is challenging. The qualitative arm of the present study explored men's decision-making to become nurses within a larger gendered context. Findings were then assessed for fit with Gender Role Conflict Theory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000310DOI Listing

Freirean Conscientization With Critical Care Nurses to Reduce Moral Distress and Increase Perceived Empowerment: A Pilot Study.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr 1. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Moral distress in nursing has been linked to a relative lack of power in the workplace. We designed and piloted a Freirean-based conscientization intervention to raise awareness and address disempowerment with 13 critical care nurses in the US Midwest who recently experienced moral distress. A transformative, mixed-methods, pre/post design was used with convergence of qualitative and quantitative data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000307DOI Listing

Existential Contradictions in Living With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Qualitative Metasynthesis.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):159-171

Section for Nursing, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark (Ms Kristensen and Dr Norlyk); VIA Faculty of Health Sciences, VIA Nursing, Holstebro, Denmark (Ms Kristensen); VIA Nursing, VIA University College, Aarhus, Denmark (Dr Henriksen); and Lillebaelt Hospital, Vejle & Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark (Dr Birkelund).

A qualitative metasynthesis following Sandelowski and Barroso's method was conducted to explore what characterizes the existential experiences of individuals living with end-stage renal disease. The findings show that patients with end-stage renal disease live with several existential contradictions characterized by the following: perception of the body-oscillating between connection and separation, maintaining life-oscillating between freedom and captivity, uncertainty-oscillating between hope and despair, and enduring technology-oscillating between being perceived as an object and subject. Consequently, living with end-stage renal disease is challenging for patients; hence, the support of nurses is important to alleviate patients' vulnerability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000312DOI Listing

We Have Never Been Nurses: Nursing in the Anthropocene, Undoing the Capitalocene.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):132-146

College of Nursing, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia (Ms Dillard-Wright); Connell School of Nursing, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts (Ms Hopkins Walsh); and College of Nursing and Health Sciences, The University of Vermont, Burlington (Mr Brown).

As nurses on this pale blue dot, the impending climate crisis requires us to engage with our world and communities differently if we hope to ensure our planetary survival, human and non. Imagining the next 50 years of nursing theory, we advance a posthuman critique of the discipline. In this article, we lay out a posthumanist critique of nursing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000313DOI Listing

Hypervisible Nurses: Effects of Circulating Ignorance and Knowledge on Acts of Whistleblowing in Health.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):114-131

Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Dr Perron); Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Australia (Dr Rudge); and School of Nursing, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (Dr Gagnon).

Whistleblowing has been examined from various angles over the past 40 years, but not yet as a matter of epistemology. Whistleblowing can be understood as resulting from the improper transmission of critical knowledge in an organization (eg, knowledge about poor care or wrongdoing). Using the sociology of ignorance, we wish to rethink whistleblowing and the failures it brings to light. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000311DOI Listing

The Role of Nurses as Allies Against Racism and Discrimination: An Analysis of Key Resistance Movements of Our Time.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):102-113

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

The remnants of colonialism manifesting as structural violence, racism, and oppression continue to plague our society as evidenced by the persistence of health inequities, particularly for minority populations in the United States. As a profession bound by moral and ethical mandates, nursing must resist and deconstruct oppression in all its forms. Nurses, informed by critical race theory, intersectionality, and historical trauma, can become formidable allies with marginalized populations in the fight for social justice and health equity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000290DOI Listing

From the Editor.

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ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):101

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000317DOI Listing

Claiming the Narrative Wave With Story Theory.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):15-27

Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton (Dr Liehr); and West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown (Dr Smith).

Over the past few decades, there has been a narrative wave that has advanced and subsided but consistently moved toward acceptance in health care circles. Despite the importance of narrative to nursing practice and research, the discipline has been slow to claim the narrative wave as its own. The purpose of this article is to claim the narrative wave for the discipline of nursing with story theory-guided research and practice and to describe dimensions of the narrative movement in health-related literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000303DOI Listing
February 2020

From the Editor.

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ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000306DOI Listing
February 2020

Family Caregiver-Receiver Mutuality: A Concept Analysis.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):E71-E79

Department of Research (Drs Wardell and Wood), The University of Texas Health Science Center Cizik School of Nursing, Houston, Texas (Mr Streck).

There are more than 43 million family caregivers in the United States. In studies of family caregivers and receivers, evidence suggests that family caregiver-receiver mutuality is linked to health. Lack of a clear definition of family caregiver-receiver mutuality is an obstacle that prevents scientific progress and effective operationalization of the concept. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000302DOI Listing
January 2020

Words Matter: Sex and Gender as Unique Variables in Research.

Authors:
John R Blakeman

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan 9. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

School of Nursing, Millikin University, Decatur, and Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois.

Sex and gender are not equivalent concepts, even though these 2 variables are often used interchangeably by researchers. The precise use of variables is critical to ensure that research and theoretical work is of the highest quality. This article defines sex and gender and the importance of recognizing both of these variables as being unique and then demonstrates the benefit of measuring both of these variables using the cardiovascular disease literature as an exemplar. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000295DOI Listing
January 2020

Social Capital: A Concept Analysis.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):E80-E111

Department of Bioethics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (Dr Westphaln); and Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, University of San Diego, California (Drs Fry-Bowers and Georges).

The concept of social capital appears in the literature of multiple disciplines as a social determinant of health, an important aspect of human interaction, and a means to support population health capacity. Little is known about the use of social capital within the context of nursing. This article's aim provides insight into the concept of social capital and nursing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000296DOI Listing
January 2020

Weight Stigma Related to Pregnancy: A Concept Analysis.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):190-199

University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The aims of this article are to (1) present a shared definition of weight stigma related to pregnancy and (2) develop a definition to inform valid and reliable nursing research addressing weight stigma in the obstetric setting. Weight stigma is increasingly prevalent in society, especially among women with prepregnancy overweight or obesity. However, a universally accepted definition of weight stigma related to pregnancy has yet to be identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000297DOI Listing
January 2020

A New Perspective on Spiritual Care: Collaborative Chaplaincy and Nursing Practice.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):147-158

Touro University of California, Vallejo (Dr Donesky); Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Ms Sprague); and University of California, San Francisco (Ms Joseph).

Spirituality is a key focus and ethical obligation of nursing practice, but many nurses express uncertainty or discomfort with this aspect of their role. The purpose of this article is to explore the domains of religion, spirituality, and culture as commonly conceptualized by chaplains, as a framework for nurses to provide spiritual care interventions to patients in acute care hospitals. Using anecdotes and illustrations from palliative care practice, this article discusses the enhanced benefits to patients and families when spiritual needs are addressed, with specialty-level chaplain interventions, primary spiritual interventions provided uniquely by nurses, or interventions that require the cooperation of both professions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000298DOI Listing
January 2020

Beyond Resilience: A Concept Analysis of Human Flourishing in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):172-189

Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina (Ms Cho and Dr Docherty); and Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (Dr Docherty).

This article explores the concept of human flourishing in the context of adolescents and young adults with cancer, using Rodgers' Evolutionary Concept Analysis method. We describe flourishing in adolescents and young adults with cancer experience as a continuous and dynamic process of growth and maturity among intrapersonal, interpersonal, and person-environmental dimensions. Flourishing adolescents and young adults with cancer achieve internal integration, evoke positive changes in their environments, and ultimately create a harmonious and balanced existence with the outside world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000292DOI Listing
January 2020

Vulnerability in Nurses: A Phenomenon That Cuts Across Professional and Private Spheres.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):E46-E56

Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark (Drs Angel and Martinsen); and Department for Health and Social Care, Molde University College, Molde, Norway (Drs Angel and Vatne).

Patients' vulnerability is a core concern in nursing. However, the nurse's endeavor to succeed may precipitate her vulnerability. Involving master students, 14 nurses' experiences of vulnerability in their professional roles were explored with a descriptive phenomenological approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000293DOI Listing
January 2020

How Nurses Come to Race: Racialization in Public Health Breastfeeding Promotion.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):E11-E24

School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada (Ms McFadden); and Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada (Dr Erikson). Alysha McFadden's fieldwork and program of study were supported by the Government of Canada (SSHRC CGM, #GXSO118), the Canadian Nurses Foundation, and The Dr Djavad Mowafaghian Foundation Endowment Fund (the Faculty of Health Sciences Child Health Practice and Research Award).

This research study shows how race becomes ascribed through nursing theory and day-to-day workplace socialization processes. We show how public health nurses supporting and promoting breastfeeding for new mothers learn about and reproduce racialized stereotypes, which shape the care they provide. Even when nurses attempt to actively resist racialized stereotypes, most participate in essentialized nursing practice by using racialized institutional practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000288DOI Listing
January 2020

Embodying Caring Science as Islamic Philosophy of Care: Implications for Nursing Practice.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):62-74

School of Nursing, Faculty of Health (Dr Goldberg), Dalhousie University (Ms Almukhaini), Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; and Watson Caring Science Institute Boulder, Colorado (Dr Watson).

Despite the diversity and complexity of nursing theories, including those embedded with a philosophy of caring, few if any have aligned their assumptions with an Islamic philosophy of caring. To do so would call into question the compatibility of such caring for some Muslim scholars. The purpose of this article is to understand how and why an Islamic philosophy of care can be taken up through an application of Watson's caring science. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000300DOI Listing
January 2020

Keeping the Nurse in the Nurse Practitioner: Returning to Our Disciplinary Roots of Knowing in Nursing.

Authors:
Sylvia K Wood

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):50-61

College of Nursing and Public Health, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York, and School of Nursing, Stony Brook University, New York.

Nurse practitioners are a vital and growing body of primary healthcare providers. The ever-changing advancements in science and technology and the increasing complexities in health care delivery are significant factors culminating in the expanding role of nurse practitioner-led care. Nurse educators are striving to develop nurse practitioner curricula to keep pace with the increasingly sophisticated knowledge and competencies nurse practitioners must possess to render safe quality care as independent primary health care providers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000301DOI Listing
January 2020

Proposing Standards for Teaching Authentic Nursing Knowledge.

Authors:
Debra R Hanna

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):42-49

The Barbara H. Hagan School of Nursing, Molloy College, Rockville Centre, New York.

This article's purpose is to propose ideas about developing teaching standards for each of 4 learner levels that lead to 4 types of nursing practice. The learner levels and types of practice are undergraduate/basic practice, graduate/enhanced practice, doctor of nursing practice/translational practice, and research doctorate/knowledge development practice. Each learner level requires different content and different teaching strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000305DOI Listing
January 2020

Development of a Theory of Wisdom-in-Action for Clinical Nursing.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):28-41

Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah and College of Nursing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Dr Matney); School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (Dr Avant); School of Nursing, University of California Los Angeles (Dr Clark); and College of Nursing and Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (Dr Staggers).

Nurses published dialogues on wisdom; yet, a conceptual model is unavailable. We present the development process for a theory of wisdom-in-action for clinical nursing developed in 3 phases: (1) a deductively derived model using derivation and synthesis; (2) inductively, a constructivist grounded theory captured the experience of wisdom in nursing practice; and (3) the 2 theories were synthesized into a nascent theory. The theory describes 2 antecedent dimensions, person-related and setting-related factors, and 2 types of wisdom, general and personal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000304DOI Listing
January 2020

Framework for Patient and Informal Caregiver Participation in Research (PAICPAIR): Part 1.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Apr/Jun;43(2):E58-E70

Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Elderly and Nursing Home Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway (Ms Staats and Drs Husebø and Tranvåg); Institute of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway (Dr Grov); Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Women's Health, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Norway (Dr Tranvåg); and Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway (Dr Tranvåg).

The term user involvement is frequently applied in research. Frameworks for patient and informal caregiver participation as coresearchers in studies concerning patients with life-threatening illness are however sparse. The PhD project Dying With Dignity-Dignity-Preserving Care for Older Women Living at Home With Incurable Cancer has implemented a thorough cooperation with patients and informal caregivers from the early stages of the research process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000289DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7192540PMC
November 2019
3 Reads

From the Editor.

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ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Oct/Dec;42(4):277

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000294DOI Listing
November 2019

Peer-Review Mentorship: What It Is and Why We Need It.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Jul/Sep;42(3):191-192

College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada (Dr Haase); and Connel School of Nursing, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Dzurec).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000272DOI Listing

Commentary.

Authors:

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Jul/Sep;42(3):190

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000285DOI Listing

Ethical, Policy, and Practice Implications of Nurses' Experiences With Assisted Death: A Synthesis.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Jul/Sep;42(3):216-230

University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna (Dr Pesut, Ms Greig, and Messrs Fulton, Janke, and Vis-Dunbar) and University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Dr Thorne), British Columbia, Canada.

The conceptualization of assisted death as an act performed by physicians has resulted in a lack of attention to nurses' roles and experiences with the processes that surround an assisted death. In this article, we synthesize evidence from 6 articles focusing on the experiences of 55 nurses from Canada, Belgium, and the Netherlands, with relevant ethical and policy implications derived from the literature. Nurses have a central role in negotiating inquiries about assisted death and in providing wraparound care for patients, families, and other health care providers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6686960PMC

Epistemic Injustice: A Philosophical Analysis of Women's Reproductive Health Care in a Somali-American Community.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):86-100

College of Nursing, Seattle University Washington.

Epistemology is the study of the grounds of knowledge. We illustrate through case studies how epistemic injustice is manifested in the delivery of reproductive health care services for women from Somalia, even though it may not be intended or recognized as injustice. Testimonial injustice occurs when women are not believed or are discredited in their aim to receive care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000283DOI Listing

Traditional Masculinity: A Review of Toxicity Rooted in Social Norms and Gender Socialization.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):E1-E10

Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton.

The toxicity of traditional masculinity has become a heated topic of mainstream media debate since the American Psychological Association's release of psychological treatment guidelines for men and boys. To recognize how traditional masculinity is toxic, there needs to be greater understanding of the social norms and gender socialization behind traditional masculinity. Gender-based social norms and gender socialization have had dire consequences on how men behave, act in relationships, and care for their health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000284DOI Listing

Factors That Influence Health-Promoting Self-care in Registered Nurses: Barriers and Facilitators.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Oct/Dec;42(4):358-373

National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Ross, Mss Touchton-Leonard, Wehrlen, and Kazmi, and Mr Perez); and Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Towson, Maryland (Dr Gibbons).

Nurses are instrumental in the battle against lifestyle-related diseases, yet nurses may not be participating in their own health-promoting self-care. This study used qualitative content analysis of survey responses to explore nurses' perceptions regarding barriers and facilitators to health-promoting behaviors such as exercise, healthy eating, and participation in stress reduction activities. Seven themes emerged: lack of time/overwork, lack of resources/facilities, fatigue, outside commitments, "unhealthy" food culture, supportive versus unsupportive individuals, and positive versus negative role models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000274DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6832775PMC
October 2020
1 Read

Analysis and Evaluation of Conceptual Model for Health-Related Quality of Life Employing Fawcett and DeSanto-Madeya's Critique Framework.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Oct/Dec;42(4):325-340

Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Illinois Cancer Center (Dr Jang); and Department of Women, Children and Family Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago (Dr Vincent).

Health-related quality of life is increasingly used as a predictor in nursing research and practice because its multidimensional constructs encompass the holistic spectrum of care. This article comprehensively analyzes and evaluates the conceptual model of health-related quality of life of Ferrans and colleagues using Fawcett and Desanto-Madeya's 2013 framework. The model encompasses all relevant concepts and propositions in its theoretical foundation while maintaining consistency with the nursing metaparadigm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000273DOI Listing

Intersectionality and Critical Realism: A Philosophical Framework for Advancing Nursing Leadership.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Oct/Dec;42(4):289-296

School of Nursing, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

This article presents intersectionality theory with critical realism as a philosophical framework for studying nursing leadership. In response to gaps in the current leadership literature, the aim is to develop an approach that addresses how the multiple social positions nurses hold can create an intersecting matrix of oppression that impacts on their opportunities to develop as leaders. The result is a theoretical foundation, which can inform the methodological framework of future studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000275DOI Listing
July 2019
9 Reads

Toward a System Theory of Stress, Resilience, and Reintegration.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):75-85

Translational Research Center for TBI and Stress Disorders (TRACTS), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts (Drs Etchin, Fonda, and McGlinchey); Department of Psychiatry, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (Drs Fonda and McGlinchey); Connell School of Nursing, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts (Dr Howard); Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts (Drs Fonda and McGlinchey); and The Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Howard).

Military to civilian reintegration is a complex, multidimensional phenomenon warranting holistic perspectives. Complex phenomena require theory to understand and interpret relationships among concepts. Despite the need for theory-driven research, recent nursing reports often lack a theoretical structure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000277DOI Listing
July 2019
1 Read

Analyzing Patients' Complaints: Awakening of the Ethic of Belonging.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Oct/Dec;42(4):278-288

The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, China (Mss Ming, Cheng, and Ming); Graduate Nursing Leadership Department, College of Nursing, East Carolina University, Greenville (Dr Wei); and Samuel Merritt University, Oakland, California (Dr Beck).

Nursing ethics are fundamental principles to nursing practice. The purpose of this study is to analyze patients' complaints filed against nurses from a nursing ethics perspective. This is a qualitative study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000278DOI Listing

Reducing 30-Day Readmissions Through Nursing Science: An Application of Transitions Theory With Best Practice Guidelines.

Authors:
Bridget Stixrood

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):2-14

Pacific Lutheran University, School of Nursing, Tacoma, Washington. Ms Stixrood is currently working as a Labor and Delivery Nurse at St Joseph Medical Center and a nurse at the Pierce County Jail. She is also a member of Sigma Theta.

The Transition Management Model was developed by and for nurse care coordinators at an Independent Health Network to reduce Medicare and Medicaid 30-day readmission rates. Preimplementation assessment revealed the need for a nursing science framework to effectively reduce 30-day readmissions. The model was developed through thoughtful integration of transitions theory with best practice guidelines set forth by Project BOOST. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000259DOI Listing
July 2019
1 Read

Clinical Information Needs: A Concept Analysis.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2020 Jan/Mar;43(1):E36-E45

The University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin (Ms Schlegel and Dr Yoder); and Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (Dr Jones).

Health care organizations have invested resources to implement and upgrade information systems capable of collecting large quantities of data. Recent technology developments have created a renewed interest in studying clinician information needs. However, a common definition and analysis of the concept clinical information needs have not been provided. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000260DOI Listing
July 2019
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Reconceptualizing the Electronic Health Record for a New Decade: A Caring Technology?

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Jul/Sep;42(3):193-205

University of Mary, Bismarck, North Dakota and UT Health, San Antonio, Texas (Dr Robichaux); Texas Woman's University, Dallas (Dr Tietze); American Nurses Association, Silver Spring, Maryland (Dr Stokes); and Health Sciences Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock (Dr McBride).

Since the 2009 publication by Petrovskaya et al on, "Dilemmas, Tetralemmas, Reimagining the Electronic Health Record," and passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, 96% of hospitals and 78% of providers have implemented the electronic health record. While many positive outcomes such as guidelines-based clinical decision support and patient portals have been realized, we explore recent issues in addition to those continuing problems identified by Petrovskaya et al that threaten patient safety and integrity of the profession. To address these challenges, we integrate polarity thinking with the tetralemma model discussed by Petrovskaya et al and propose application of a virtue ethics framework focused on cultivation of technomoral wisdom. Read More

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Letter to the Editor.

Authors:
Elise Mollohan

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Jul/Sep;42(3):188-189

PhD in Nursing Candidate The University of Akron Akron, Ohio Professional Instructor Ashland University Ashland, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000280DOI Listing
February 2020
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Letter to the Editor.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Jul/Sep;42(3):185-187

PhD Student University of Washington School of Nursing Seattle, Washington

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February 2020
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Guest Editorial.

Authors:

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Apr/Jun;42(2):87-88

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000270DOI Listing
May 2019
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Movement and Mobility: A Concept Analysis.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci 2019 Oct/Dec;42(4):E11-E23

School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences (Ms Moulton and Dt Wilson), and Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (Dr Deluzio), Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

This article provides an analysis of the concepts of movement and mobility within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) for patients' functioning, disability, and health. The methodology developed by Walker and Avant was used to clarify definitions, components, and relationships relevant to the 2 concepts and to the elements of the ICF framework. Definitions and the relationship between concepts are key information that clinicians and researchers need to measure the correct concept when they are assessing the effectiveness of interventions in nursing practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ANS.0000000000000247DOI Listing
April 2019
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