239 results match your criteria Advances In Marine Biology[Journal]


The future ocean we want.

Authors:
Ferdinando Boero

Adv Mar Biol 2021 25;90:51-63. Epub 2021 Sep 25.

Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy; Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy; CNR-IAS, Genoa, Italy. Electronic address:

Backcasting involves the design of a desirable future that is not simply predicted with forecasts being, instead, proactively aimed at with effective action. So far, all initiatives towards sustainability failed, probably due to lack of investments in the acquisition of knowledge on the structure and the function of natural systems (i.e. Read More

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November 2021

Current and future considerations for shark conservation in the Northeast and Eastern Central Pacific Ocean.

Adv Mar Biol 2021 30;90:1-49. Epub 2021 Sep 30.

Seattle Aquarium, Conservation Programs and Partnerships, Seattle, WA, United States.

Sharks are iconic and ecologically important predators found in every ocean. Because of their ecological role as predators, some considered apex predators, and concern over the stability of their populations due to direct and indirect overfishing, there has been an increasing amount of work focussed on shark conservation, and other elasmobranchs such as skates and rays, around the world. Here we discuss many aspects of current shark science and conservation and the path to the future of shark conservation in the Northeastern and Eastern Central Pacific. Read More

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November 2021

Preface.

Authors:
Charles Sheppard

Adv Mar Biol 2021 ;89:xxxi-xxxii

School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.

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January 2021

From an economic crisis to a pandemic crisis: The need for accurate marine monitoring data to take informed management decisions.

Adv Mar Biol 2021 16;89:79-114. Epub 2021 Sep 16.

Department of Biological & Marine Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom; International Estuarine & Coastal Specialists (IECS) Ltd, Leven, United Kingdom.

It is axomatic that a system cannot be managed unless it is measured and that the measurements occur in a rigorous, defendable manner covering relevant spatial and temporal scales. Furthermore, it is not possible to predict the future direction of a system unless any predictive approach or model is supported by empirical evidence from monitoring. The marine system is no different from any other system in these regards. Read More

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October 2021

Human impacts on deep-sea sponge grounds: Applying environmental omics to monitoring.

Adv Mar Biol 2021 16;89:53-78. Epub 2021 Sep 16.

Changing Ocean Research Group, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Sponges (Phylum Porifera) are the oldest extant Metazoans. In the deep sea, sponges can occur at high densities forming habitats known as sponge grounds. Sponge grounds can extend over large areas of up to hundreds of km and are biodiversity hotspots. Read More

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October 2021

Mediterranean rocky reefs in the Anthropocene: Present status and future concerns.

Adv Mar Biol 2021 16;89:1-51. Epub 2021 Sep 16.

Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy; Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze del Mare, Rome, Italy; Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy.

Global change is striking harder and faster in the Mediterranean Sea than elsewhere, where high levels of human pressure and proneness to climate change interact in modifying the structure and disrupting regulative mechanisms of marine ecosystems. Rocky reefs are particularly exposed to such environmental changes with ongoing trends of degradation being impressive. Due to the variety of habitat types and associated marine biodiversity, rocky reefs are critical for the functioning of marine ecosystems, and their decline could profoundly affect the provision of essential goods and services which human populations in coastal areas rely upon. Read More

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October 2021

Effects of climate change factors on marine macroalgae: A review.

Authors:
Yan Ji Kunshan Gao

Adv Mar Biol 2021 13;88:91-136. Epub 2020 Dec 13.

State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University/College of Ocean and Earth Sciences, Xiamen, China; Co-Innovation Center of Jiangsu Marine Bio-industry Technology, Jiangsu Ocean University, Lianyungang, China. Electronic address:

Marine macroalgae, the main primary producers in coastal waters, play important roles in the fishery industry and global carbon cycles. With progressive ocean global changes, however, they are increasingly exposed to enhanced levels of multiple environmental drivers, such as ocean acidification, warming, heatwaves, UV radiation and deoxygenation. While most macroalgae have developed physiological strategies against variations of these drivers, their eco-physiological responses to each or combinations of the drivers differ spatiotemporally and species-specifically. Read More

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A review of the fisheries, life history and stock structure of tropical tuna (skipjack Katsuwonus pelamis, yellowfin Thunnus albacares and bigeye Thunnus obesus) in the Indian Ocean.

Adv Mar Biol 2021 3;88:39-89. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

AZTI, Marine Research, Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), Herrea Kaia, Pasaia, Gipuzkoa, Spain; International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, DC, United States.

Skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis), yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) and bigeye (Thunnus obesus) tuna are the target species of tropical tuna fisheries in the Indian Ocean, with high commercial value in the international market. High fishing pressure over the past three decades has raised concerns about their sustainability. Understanding life history strategies and stock structure is essential to determine species resilience and how they might respond to exploitation. Read More

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Potential loss of biodiversity and the critical importance of taxonomy-An Australian perspective.

Authors:
Pat Hutchings

Adv Mar Biol 2021 ;88:3-16

Australian Museum Research Institute, Australian Museum, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, Australia.

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October 2021

Mission possible: Holistic approaches can heal marine wounds.

Authors:
Ferdinando Boero

Adv Mar Biol 2021 ;88:19-38

Dipartimento di Biologia, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy; CoNISMa, Rome, Italy; CNR-IAS, Genova, Italy; Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy. Electronic address:

Ocean sciences comprise a vast array of disciplines ranging from physics to socio-economics. The various approaches compete with each other for visibility, rather than cooperate and join forces. Communication beyond the science journals tends to focus on charismatic species and habitats (the ohhh tactics, aimed at provoking wonder) that does not result in the full perception (the ahhh strategy) of the role of ocean sciences for our well-being. Read More

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The origins, relationships, evolution and conservation of the weirdest marine bivalves: The watering pot shells. A review.

Adv Mar Biol 2021 21;88:137-220. Epub 2021 May 21.

Department of Animal Biology, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, Brazil. Electronic address:

The fossil record shows that the two clavagelloid or watering pot families evolved at different times, the Clavagellidae first in the late Mesozoic (100-66mya), the Penicillidae later in the Cenozoic (33-23mya)-the former originally with, thus, a near-global Tethyan distribution, the latter restricted to the Indo-West Pacific. Representatives of the two clavagelloid families, moreover, have wholly different adventitious tube/crypt structures and, thus, methods of formation suggesting that evolutionary experiments have been undertaken to achieve such radical architectural novelties. This has resulted in one of the most surprising examples of convergent evolution in the Bivalvia. Read More

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The population dynamics of the coral reef crisis-Prologue.

Authors:
Bernhard M Riegl

Adv Mar Biol 2020 ;87(1):xxxvii-xl

Department of Marine and Environmental Science, Halmos College of Arts and Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL, United States.

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Spatial and temporal differences in Acropora cervicornis colony size and health.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 7;87(1):83-114. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

Halmos College of Arts and Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL, United States.

Little to no recovery in Acropora cervicornis populations has been documented since the 1970s and 1980s widespread disease events, and disease and predation appear to remain significant drivers of mortality. However, to date, demographic studies of A. cervicornis lack data temporally or spatially sufficient to quantify factors limiting recovery. Read More

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December 2020

Population dynamics of diseased corals: Effects of a Shut Down Reaction outbreak in Puerto Rican Acropora cervicornis.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 7;87(1):61-82. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

Sociedad Ambiente Marino, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Chronic coral reef degradation has been characterized by a significant decline in the population abundance and live tissue cover of scleractinian corals across the wider Caribbean. Acropora cervicornis is among the species whose populations have suffered an unprecedented collapse throughout the region. This species, which once dominated the shallow-water reef communities, is susceptible to a wide range of stressors, resulting in a general lack of recovery following disturbances. Read More

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December 2020

A tropical eastern Pacific invasive brittle star species (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) reaches southeastern Florida.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 30;87(1):443-472. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, FL, United States.

The invasive brittle star Ophiothela mirabilis (family Ophiotrichidae), a tropical Indo-Pacific endemic species, first reported in Atlantic waters off southern Brazil in 2000, has extended its range northward to the Caribbean Sea, to the Lesser Antilles in 2011, and was first reported in south Florida in January 2019. Its occurrence in southeast Florida extends along nearly 70km of coastline, from near the Port of Miami, Miami-Dade County, northward to Deerfield Beach, Broward County. It occurs abundantly as an epizoite on octocorals, attaining population densities of 25 individuals and more per 10-cm long octocoral stem. Read More

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December 2020

Octocoral populations and connectivity in continental Ecuador and Galápagos, Eastern Pacific.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 29;87(1):411-441. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Halmos College of Arts and Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL, United States.

Octocorals are important zoobenthic organisms, contributing to structural heterogeneity and species diversity on hardgrounds. Their persistence amidst global coral reef degradation and ocean acidification, has prompted renewed interest in this taxon. Octocoral assemblages at 52 sites in continental Ecuador and Galápagos (23 species, 3742 colonies) were examined for composition, size distributions within and among populations, and connectivity patterns based on ocean current models. Read More

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December 2020

The rise of octocoral forests on Caribbean reefs.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 30;87(1):361-410. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Department of Biology, California State University, Northridge, CA, United States.

Coral reefs throughout the tropics have experienced large declines in the abundance of scleractinian corals over the last few decades, and some reefs are becoming functionally dominated by animal taxa other than scleractinians. This phenomenon is striking on many shallow reefs in the tropical western Atlantic, where arborescent octocorals now are numerically and functionally dominant. Octocorals are one of several taxa that have been overlooked for decades in analyses of coral reef community dynamics, and our understanding of why octocorals are favoured (whereas scleractinians are not) on some modern reefs, and how they will affect the function of future reef communities, is not commensurate with the task of scientifically responding to the coral reef crisis. Read More

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December 2020

The timing and causality of ecological shifts on Caribbean reefs.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 8;87(1):331-360. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Caribbean reefs have experienced unprecedented changes in the past four decades. Of great concern is the perceived widespread shift from coral to macroalgal dominance and the question of whether it represents a new, stable equilibrium for coral-reef communities. The primary causes of the shift-grazing pressure (top-down), nutrient loading (bottom-up) or direct coral mortality (side-in)-still remain somewhat controversial in the coral-reef literature. Read More

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December 2020

Projected shifts in coral size structure in the Anthropocene.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 7;87(1):31-60. Epub 2020 Sep 7.

Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia.

Changes in the size structure of coral populations have major consequences for population dynamics and community function, yet many coral reef monitoring projects do not record this critical feature. Consequently, our understanding of current and future trajectories in coral size structure, and the demographic processes underlying these changes, is still emerging. Here, we provide a conceptual summary of the benefits to be gained from more comprehensive attention to the size of coral colonies in reef monitoring projects, and we support our argument through the use of case-history examples and a simplified ecological model. Read More

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December 2020

Coral community life histories and population dynamics driven by seascape bathymetry and temperature variability.

Authors:
Tim R McClanahan

Adv Mar Biol 2020 24;87(1):291-330. Epub 2020 Oct 24.

Wildlife Conservation Society, Marine Programs, Bronx, NY, United States. Electronic address:

Temperature variability, habitat, coral communities, and fishing intensity are important factors influencing coral responses to climate change. Consequently, chronic and acute sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) and their interactions with habitat and fishing were studied along the East African coast (~400km) by evaluating changes over a ~25-year period in two major reef habitats-island and fringing reefs. These habitats had similar mean and standard deviation temperature measurements but differed in that islands had lower ocean heights and flatter and less right-skewed temperature distributions than fringing reefs. Read More

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December 2020

COTSMod: A spatially explicit metacommunity model of outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish and coral recovery.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 ;87(1):259-290

The Environment Institute and School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Outbreaks of the Pacific crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS; Acanthaster cf. solaris) have been responsible for 40% of the decline in coral cover on the GBR over the last 35 years. With the intensity and frequency of bleaching and cyclonic disturbances increasing, effectively managing these outbreaks may allow reefs an opportunity to recover from these cumulative impacts. Read More

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December 2020

Larval connectivity and water quality explain spatial distribution of crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks across the Great Barrier Reef.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 8;87(1):223-258. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia.

Outbreaks of the coral eating crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS; Acanthasts cf. solaris) occur in cyclical waves along the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), contributing significantly to the decline in hard coral cover over the past 30 years. One main difficulty faced by scientists and managers alike, is understanding the relative importance of contributing factors to COTS outbreaks such as increased nutrients and water quality, larval connectivity, fishing pressure, and abiotic conditions. Read More

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December 2020

Biophysical model of coral population connectivity in the Arabian/Persian Gulf.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 17;87(1):193-221. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Halmos College of Arts and Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL, United States.

The coral reef ecosystems of the Arabian/Persian Gulf (the Gulf) are facing profound pressure from climate change (extreme temperatures) and anthropogenic (land-use and population-related) stressors. Increasing degradation at local and regional scales has already resulted in widespread coral cover reduction. Connectivity, the transport and exchange of larvae among geographically separated populations, plays an essential role in recovery and maintenance of biodiversity and resilience of coral reef populations. Read More

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December 2020

Considering the rates of growth in two taxa of coral across Pacific islands.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 27;87(1):167-191. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States.

Reef-building coral taxa demonstrate considerable flexibility and diversity in reproduction and growth mechanisms. Corals take advantage of this flexibility to increase or decrease size through clonal expansion and loss of live tissue area (i.e. Read More

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December 2020

Population fluctuations of the fungiid coral Cycloseris curvata, Galápagos Islands, Ecuador.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 30;87(1):141-166. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Halmos College of Arts and Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL, United States.

Fungiid corals (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Scleractinia) occur at isolated locations scattered throughout the eastern tropical Pacific. They can be reef-associated but are often found on sand and rubble substrata distant from reef coral habitat. Cycloseris curvata is known in this region from the southern Gulf of California, through Mexico, Costa Rica, and Panamá, and with the southern-most populations occurring in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. Read More

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December 2020

Population dynamics and growth rates of free-living mushroom corals (Scleractinia: Fungiidae) in the sediment-stressed reefs of Singapore.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 27;87(1):115-140. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Experimental Marine Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

The reefs of Singapore provide an excellent opportunity to study the population dynamics and growth rates of free-living mushroom corals (Fungiidae) under sediment-stressed conditions. Transect surveys at four study sites revealed a total of 11 free-living mushroom coral species-the same 11 species as those found by local studies since the 1980s. The abundance of the four most common species ranged from 1. Read More

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December 2020

Population dynamics of the reef crisis: Consequences of the growing human population.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 20;87(1):1-30. Epub 2020 Aug 20.

Department of Marine Biology and Ecology, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States.

An unequivocal link exists between human population density and environmental degradation, both in the near field (local impacts) and far field (impacts due to teleconnections). Human population is most widely predicted to reach 9-11 billion by 2100, when the demographic transition is expected in all but a handful of countries. Strongest population growth is in the tropics, where coral reefs face dense human population and concomitant heavy usage. Read More

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December 2020

Marine environmental DNA: Approaches, applications, and opportunities.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 21;86(1):141-169. Epub 2020 May 21.

Genomics and Bioinformatics Cluster, Department of Biology, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, United States.

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is increasingly being used to document species distributions and habitat use in marine systems, with much of the recent effort focused on leveraging advances in next-generation DNA sequencing to assess and track biodiversity across taxonomic groups. Environmental DNA offers a number of important advantages over traditional survey techniques, including non-invasive sampling, sampling where traditional approaches are impractical or inefficient (e.g. Read More

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The biology and ecology of the banana prawns: Penaeus merguiensis de Man and P. indicus H. Milne Edwards.

Adv Mar Biol 2020 13;86(1):1-139. Epub 2020 Jun 13.

CSIRO Oceans & Atmosphere, Queensland BioSciences Precinct, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.

The two banana prawns Penaeus merguiensis and P. indicus are arguably the most commercially important species of penaeid prawns in the tropical and sub-tropical Indo-West Pacific region. They are fecund, short-lived, and have a complex life history involving offshore spawning, inshore mangrove-lined nursery grounds, and migrations between the two locations. Read More

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