196 results match your criteria Advances In Marine Biology[Journal]


Preface.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;81:xxix-xxx

Ecosystem Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2881(18)30048-8DOI Listing

Fate and Transport Modelling of Emerging Pollutants from Watersheds to Oceans: A Review.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;81:97-128. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

The Northern Region Persistent Organic Pollution Control (NRPOP) Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada.

This chapter provides a review of the fate and transport modelling of emerging pollutants (EPs) and discusses the major research challenges. The overwhelming limitation of the past modelling studies has been the lack of data necessary for model validation, thus calling for large-scale field data sampling. The identification and understanding of fate and transport processes and their interactions of the target EPs and the corresponding selection of appropriate parameter values were also challenging. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881183001
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.09.002DOI Listing
March 2019
11 Reads
3.483 Impact Factor

Characterization of Nitrogen-Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Heterocycles in Crude Oils and Refined Petroleum Products.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;81:59-96. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Science and Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

A large amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their heterocyclic analogues (N, S, O) are released to the marine environment from natural oil seeps, oil spills, bilge discharges and input of land-based sources. Many of these compounds are toxic and have a deleterious effect on marine biota. Nitrogen-containing compounds in crude oils are typically present as cyclic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs) and are generally classified into the two categories of nonbasic (N-PANHs) and basic compounds (B-PANHs). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881183002
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.09.006DOI Listing
March 2019
17 Reads

Occurrence, Impact, Analysis and Treatment of Metformin and Guanylurea in Coastal Aquatic Environments of Canada, USA and Europe.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;81:23-58. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

The Northern Region Persistent Organic Pollution Control (NRPOP) Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada.

This review discusses the occurrence, impact, analysis and treatment of metformin and guanylurea in coastal aquatic environments of Canada, USA and Europe. Metformin, a biguanide in chemical classification, is widely used as one of the most effective first-line oral drugs for type 2 diabetes. It is difficult to be metabolized by the human body and exists in both urine and faeces samples in these regions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881183002
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.09.005DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read
3.483 Impact Factor

Synthetic Musks: A Class of Commercial Fragrance Additives in Personal Care Products (PCPs) Causing Concern as Emerging Contaminants.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;81:213-280. Epub 2018 Nov 10.

College of Environmental Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China. Electronic address:

Synthetic musks (SMs) are promising fragrance additives used in personal care products (PCPs). The widespread presence of SMs in environmental media remains a serious risk because of their harmful effects. Recently, the environmental hazards of SMs have been widely reported in various environmental samples including those from coastal and marine regions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881183002
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.09.008DOI Listing
March 2019
13 Reads

Brominated Flame Retardants, Microplastics, and Biocides in the Marine Environment: Recent Updates of Occurrence, Analysis, and Impacts.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;81:167-211. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada. Electronic address:

Emerging contaminants (ECs) may pose adverse effects on the marine ecosystem and human health. Based on the analysis of publications filed in recent years, this paper provides a comprehensive overview on three prominent groups of ECs, i.e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.09.007DOI Listing
March 2019
3.483 Impact Factor

Modification of Hexachlorobenzene to Molecules with Lower Long-Range Transport Potentials Using 3D-QSAR Models with a Full Factor Experimental Design.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;81:129-165. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

College of Environmental Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China. Electronic address:

In this study, the hexachlorobenzene molecule was modified by three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models and a full factor experimental design to obtain new hexachlorobenzene molecules with low migration ability. The 3D-QSAR models (comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA)) were constructed by SYBLY-X 2.0 software, using experimental data of octanol-air partition coefficients (K) for 12 chlorobenzenes (CBs) congeners as the dependent variable, and the structural parameters of CBs as independent variables, respectively. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881183001
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.09.004DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

The Potential Impact of Hydrocarbons on Mussels in Port au Port Bay, Newfoundland.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;81:1-22. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada. Electronic address:

Since 2012, the scallop fishery in Port au Port Bay, Newfoundland, Canada has experienced a drastic decline, while no decline was observed in adjacent St. George's Bay. Local fishermen have raised concerns about an abandoned oil exploration well in the Port au Port Bay. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.09.003DOI Listing

The Importance of Natural Acidified Systems in the Study of Ocean Acidification: What Have We Learned?

Adv Mar Biol 2018;80:57-99. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Marine Community Ecology and Climate Change, Departamento de Biología Animal, Edafología y Geología, Facultad de Ciencias (Biología), Universidad de La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Electronic address:

Human activity is generating an excess of atmospheric CO, resulting in what we know as ocean acidification, which produces changes in marine ecosystems. Until recently, most of the research in this area had been done under small-scale, laboratory conditions, using few variables, few species and few life cycle stages. These limitations raise questions about the reproducibility of the environment and about the importance of indirect effects and synergies in the final results of these experiments. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.08.001DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Drivers of Soft and Stony Coral Community Distribution on the High-Latitude Coral Reefs of South Africa.

Adv Mar Biol 2018;80:1-55. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Oceanographic Research Institute, Durban, South Africa.

The role of abiotic parameters in determining the distribution of coral communities was assessed on the relatively pristine Maputaland reefs of South Africa from comprehensive reef survey data. The reefs, on which 42 communities could be defined, occur within three geographically separate complexes. Patterns in benthic distribution could be partially explained by latitude and depth, in particular, with slope, turbulence and reef aspect playing far less role in that order. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.09.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Mediterranean Bioconstructions Along the Italian Coast.

Adv Mar Biol 2018 30;79:61-136. Epub 2018 Jun 30.

Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali (DiSTeBA), University of Salento, Lecce, Italy; Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze del Mare (CoNISMa), Rome, Italy; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Scienze Marine (CNR-ISMAR), Genova, Italy.

Marine bioconstructions are biodiversity-rich, three-dimensional biogenic structures, regulating key ecological functions of benthic ecosystems worldwide. Tropical coral reefs are outstanding for their beauty, diversity and complexity, but analogous types of bioconstructions are also present in temperate seas. The main bioconstructions in the Mediterranean Sea are represented by coralligenous formations, vermetid reefs, deep-sea cold-water corals, Lithophyllum byssoides trottoirs, coral banks formed by the shallow-water corals Cladocora caespitosa or Astroides calycularis, and sabellariid or serpulid worm reefs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.05.001DOI Listing
October 2018
26 Reads

Potential Impacts of Offshore Oil and Gas Activities on Deep-Sea Sponges and the Habitats They Form.

Adv Mar Biol 2018 9;79:33-60. Epub 2018 Mar 9.

School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, United States. Electronic address:

Sponges form an important component of benthic ecosystems from shallow littoral to hadal depths. In the deep ocean, beyond the continental shelf, sponges can form high-density fields, constituting important habitats supporting rich benthic communities. Yet these habitats remain relatively unexplored. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.01.001DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

The Biology of Seamounts: 25 Years on.

Authors:
Alex D Rogers

Adv Mar Biol 2018 6;79:137-224. Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Seamounts are one of the major biomes of the global ocean. The last 25 years of research has seen considerable advances in the understanding of these ecosystems. The interactions between seamounts and steady and variable flows have now been characterised providing a better mechanistic understanding of processes influencing biology. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881183000
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2018.06.001DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

A Review of Patterns of Multiple Paternity Across Sea Turtle Rookeries.

Adv Mar Biol 2018 2;79:1-31. Epub 2017 Nov 2.

Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia. Electronic address:

Why females would mate with multiple partners and have multiple fathers for clutches or litters is a long-standing enigma. There is a broad dichotomy in hypotheses ranging from polyandry having benefits to simply being an unavoidable consequence of a high incidence of male-female encounters. If females simply give in to mating when it is too costly to avoid being harassed by males (convenience polyandry), then there should be a higher rate of mating as density increases. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.09.004DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Shark Interactions With Directed and Incidental Fisheries in the Northeast Pacific Ocean: Historic and Current Encounters, and Challenges for Shark Conservation.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;78:9-44. Epub 2017 Oct 16.

Auke Bay Laboratories, National Marine Fisheries Service, Juneau, AK, United States.

For over 100 years, sharks have been encountered, as either directed catch or incidental catch, in commercial fisheries throughout the Northeast Pacific Ocean. A long-standing directed fishery for North Pacific Spiny Dogfish (Squalus suckleyi) has occurred and dominated shark landings and discards. Other fisheries, mainly for shark livers, have historically targeted species including Bluntnose Sixgill Shark (Hexanchus griseus) and Tope Shark (Galeorhinus galeus). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.09.003DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read

Sharks in Captivity: The Role of Husbandry, Breeding, Education, and Citizen Science in Shark Conservation.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;78:89-119. Epub 2017 Sep 15.

Seattle Aquarium, Seattle, WA, United States.

The role of public aquariums in promoting conservation has changed substantially over the decades, evolving from entertainment attractions to educational and research centres. In many facilities, larger sharks are an essential part of the collection and represent one of the biggest draws for the public. Displaying healthy elasmobranchs comes with many challenges, but improvements in husbandry techniques have enabled aquariums to have success with a variety of species. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.08.002DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read

An Introduction to Modelling Abundance and Life History Parameters in Shark Populations.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;78:45-87. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

Earth to Ocean Research Group, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Elasmobranchs play critically important ecological roles throughout the world's oceans, yet in many cases, their slow life histories and interactions with fisheries makes them particularly susceptible to exploitation. Management for these species requires robust scientific input, and mathematical models are the backbone of science-based management. In this chapter, we provide an introductory overview of the use of mathematical models to estimate shark abundance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.08.001DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read

Conclusions: The Future of Shark Management and Conservation in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.

Authors:
Dayv Lowry

Adv Mar Biol 2017;78:155-164. Epub 2017 Oct 3.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Marine Fish Science Unit, Olympia, WA, United States. Electronic address:

Human interactions with sharks in the Northeast Pacific Ocean (NEP) have occurred for millennia but were largely limited to nearshore encounters as target and nontarget catch in fisheries. The arrival of Spanish explorers in the mid-1500s, followed by subsequent waves of explorers and colonizers from Europe and Russia, did little to change this relationship, until the mid-1800s. As technological advances conferred the ability to exploit marine fish further offshore and in deeper water, substantial fisheries developed and many of these encountered, and sometimes directly targeted, sharks. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.09.002DOI Listing

The Economy of Shark Conservation in the Northeast Pacific: The Role of Ecotourism and Citizen Science.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;78:121-153. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

Ravencroft Lodge, Valdez, AK, United States.

Historically sharks have been seen either as a source of income through harvesting, or as a nuisance and danger. The economic value of sharks has traditionally been measured as the total value of sharks caught for liver oil, fins, or meat for consumption. Sharks have also been killed to near extinction in cases where they were seen as a threat to fisheries on other species. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.08.003DOI Listing

Introduction to Northeast Pacific Shark Biology, Research, and Conservation, Part B.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;78:1-8. Epub 2017 Oct 9.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Marine Fish Science Unit, Olympia, WA, United States.

Sharks are iconic, sometimes apex, predators found in every ocean. Because of their ecological role as predators and concern over the stability of their populations, there has been an increasing amount of work focused on shark conservation around the world in recent decades. The populations of sharks that reside in the Northeast Pacific (NEP) Ocean bordering the west coast of the United States reside in one of the most economically and ecologically important oceanic regions in the world. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881173002
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.09.001DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read

Biodiversity, Life History, and Conservation of Northeastern Pacific Chondrichthyans.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;77:9-78. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

Earth to Ocean Research Group, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

The sharks, batoids, and chimaeras, collectively the class Chondrichthyes, are one of the most successful groups of fishes, with over 1250 species globally. Recent taxonomic revisions have increased their diversity by about 20% over the past 17 years (2000-2016). The Northeast Pacific Ocean is one of the top 20 most diverse regions/countries on the globe with 77 chondrichthyan species, a number less than a quarter that of the most species-rich area (Australia) but that has increased by 10% since 2000 to include three new species (two skates and a chimaera). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.07.001DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

Review of Current Conservation Genetic Analyses of Northeast Pacific Sharks.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;77:79-110. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, United States.

Conservation genetics is an applied science that utilizes molecular tools to help solve problems in species conservation and management. It is an interdisciplinary specialty in which scientists apply the study of genetics in conjunction with traditional ecological fieldwork and other techniques to explore molecular variation, population boundaries, and evolutionary relationships with the goal of enabling resource managers to better protect biodiversity and identify unique populations. Several shark species in the northeast Pacific (NEP) have been studied using conservation genetics techniques, which are discussed here. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.06.005DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Age and Growth of Elasmobranchs and Applications to Fisheries Management and Conservation in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;77:179-220. Epub 2017 Aug 17.

Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA, United States.

In addition to being an academic endeavour, the practical purpose of conducting age and growth studies on fishes is to provide biological data to stock assessment scientists and fisheries managers so they may better understand population demographics and manage exploitation rates. Age and size data are used to build growth models, which are a critical component of stock assessments. Though age determination of elasmobranchs in the northeast Pacific Ocean (NEP) began in the 1930s, the field has evolved substantially in recent years, allowing scientists to incorporate age data into assessments for more species than ever before. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.06.002DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Stable Isotope Applications for Understanding Shark Ecology in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;77:149-178. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA, United States.

Stable isotopes are used to address a wide range of ecological questions and can help researchers and managers better understand the movement and trophic ecology of sharks. Here, we review how shark studies from the Northeast Pacific Ocean (NEP) have employed stable isotopes to estimate trophic level and diet composition and infer movement and habitat-use patterns. To date, the number of NEP shark studies that have used stable isotopes is limited, suggesting that the approach is underutilized. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.06.003DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Diet Composition and Trophic Ecology of Northeast Pacific Ocean Sharks.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;77:111-148. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Panama City Laboratory, FL, United States.

Although there is a general perception of sharks as large pelagic, apex predators, most sharks are smaller, meso- and upper-trophic level predators that are associated with the seafloor. Among 73 shark species documented in the eastern North Pacific (ENP), less than half reach maximum lengths >200cm, and 78% occur in demersal or benthic regions of the continental shelf or slope. Most small (≤200cm) species (e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.06.001DOI Listing

Introduction to Northeast Pacific Shark Biology, Ecology, and Conservation.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;77:1-8. Epub 2017 Aug 2.

Seattle Aquarium, Seattle, WA, United States.

Sharks are iconic, sometimes apex, predators found in every ocean and, as a result, they have featured prominently in the mythology, history, and fisheries of diverse human cultures around the world. Because of their regional significance to fisheries and ecological role as predators, and as a result of concern over long-term stability of their populations, there has been an increasing amount of work focused on shark conservation in recent decades. This volume highlights the biodiversity and biological attributes of, and conservation efforts targeted at, populations of sharks that reside in the Northeast Pacific Ocean bordering the west coast of the United States and Canada, one of the most economically and ecologically important oceanic regions in the world. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881173000
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2017.06.004DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

Preface.

Authors:
Barbara E Curry

Adv Mar Biol 2017;76:xxv-xxvi

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2881(16)30059-1DOI Listing
June 2017
1 Read

Patterns and Drivers of Egg Pigment Intensity and Colour Diversity in the Ocean: A Meta-Analysis of Phylum Echinodermata.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;76:41-104. Epub 2016 Nov 29.

Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada.

Egg pigmentation is proposed to serve numerous ecological, physiological, and adaptive functions in egg-laying animals. Despite the predominance and taxonomic diversity of egg layers, syntheses reviewing the putative functions and drivers of egg pigmentation have been relatively narrow in scope, centring almost exclusively on birds. Nonvertebrate and aquatic species are essentially overlooked, yet many of them produce maternally provisioned eggs in strikingly varied colours, from pale yellow to bright red or green. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00652881163003
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.10.001DOI Listing
June 2017
1 Read

Advances in Biochemical Indices of Zooplankton Production.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;76:157-240. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

Instituto de Oceanografía y Cambio Global, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Telde, Gran Canaria, Spain.

Several new approaches for measuring zooplankton growth and production rates have been developed since the publication of the ICES (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea) Zooplankton Methodology Manual (Harris et al., 2000). In this review, we summarize the advances in biochemical methods made in recent years. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.09.001DOI Listing

Biological Conservation of Giant Limpets: The Implications of Large Size.

Adv Mar Biol 2017;76:105-155. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

UMR 9190 MARBEC, Groupe fonctionnel AEO, Université de Montpellier 2, Montpellier, France.

Patellogastropods, also known as true limpets, are distributed throughout the world and constitute key species in coastal ecosystems. Some limpet species achieve remarkable sizes, which in the most extreme cases can surpass 35cm in shell length. In this review, we focus on giant limpets, which are defined as those with a maximum shell size surpassing 10cm. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.10.002DOI Listing

Islands in a Sea of Mud: Insights From Terrestrial Island Theory for Community Assembly on Insular Marine Substrata.

Authors:
K S Meyer

Adv Mar Biol 2017;76:1-40. Epub 2016 Nov 11.

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, Charleston, OR, United States. Electronic address:

Most marine hard-bottom habitats are isolated, separated from other similar habitats by sand or mud flats, and can be considered analogous to terrestrial islands. The extensive scientific literature on terrestrial islands provides a theoretical framework for the analysis of isolated marine habitats. More individuals and higher species richness occur on larger marine substrata, a pattern that resembles terrestrial islands. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.09.002DOI Listing

Preface.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:xxix-xxx

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2881(16)30044-XDOI Listing
March 2017
1 Read

Fin Whales, Balaenoptera physalus: At Home in a Changing Mediterranean Sea?

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:75-101. Epub 2016 Sep 24.

Tethys Research Institute, Acquario Civico, Milano, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.08.002DOI Listing

The International Legal Framework for Marine Mammal Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea.

Authors:
T Scovazzi

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:387-416. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Dipartimento giuridico delle istituzioni nazionali ed europee, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy. Electronic address:

The paper reviews the international treaties that are today applicable for the protection of marine mammals in the Mediterranean Sea. They include instruments applicable at the world or the regional level. Emphasis is put on the International Whaling Commission, which is today affected by a confrontation between the two opposing groups of nonwhaling and whaling parties, the Agreement on the Conservation of Cetaceans of the Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Contiguous Atlantic Area (ACCOBAMS) and its implementation through the resolutions adopted by the Meeting of the Parties, as well as the subregional Agreement between France, Italy and Monaco for the establishment of a sanctuary for the protection of marine mammals (Pelagos Sanctuary). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.07.006DOI Listing

Mediterranean Sperm Whales, Physeter macrocephalus: The Precarious State of a Lost Tribe.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:37-74. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Pelagos Cetacean Research Institute, Vouliagmeni, Greece.

First observed in the classical era, a population of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) persists to this day in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. Genetic and observational evidence support the notion that this is an isolated population, separated from its Atlantic neighbours. These whales depend on mesopelagic squid for food, and appear to occupy a very similar ecological niche to sperm whales in the open oceans. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.08.001DOI Listing

Are Mediterranean Monk Seals, Monachus monachus, Being Left to Save Themselves from Extinction?

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:359-386. Epub 2016 Sep 14.

WWF Greece, Athens, Greece.

Mediterranean monk seals (Monachus monachus), amongst the most endangered marine mammals, are showing localised signs of recovery warranting their recent down-listing, from Critically Endangered to Endangered, on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. This, however, cannot be taken as a reason for complacency, as the species' condition is still very critical, having been extirpated from most of its historical range. Monk seals within the Mediterranean, a 'unit to conserve' separate from Atlantic conspecifics, were once widely distributed throughout the Mediterranean Sea, with their range also extending into the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.08.004DOI Listing

Harbour Porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, in the Mediterranean Sea and Adjacent Regions: Biogeographic Relicts of the Last Glacial Period.

Authors:
M C Fontaine

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:333-358. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences (GELIFES), University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

The harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena, is one of the best studied cetacean species owing to its common distribution along the coastal waters of the Northern Hemisphere. In European waters, strandings are common and bycatch mortalities in commercial fisheries reach alarming numbers. Lethal interactions resulting from human activities together with ongoing environmental changes raise serious concerns about population viability throughout the species' range. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.08.006DOI Listing

Dolphins in a Scaled-Down Mediterranean: The Gulf of Corinth's Odontocetes.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:297-331. Epub 2016 Aug 28.

Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, Montpellier, France.

The Gulf of Corinth is a 2400-km semi-enclosed inland system (a mediterraneus) in central Greece. Its continental shelf areas, steep bottom relief, and waters up to 500-900m deep offer suitable habitat to neritic and pelagic species. We used photographic capture-recapture, distribution modelling, and direct observations to investigate the abundance, status, habitat preferences, movements, and group size of four odontocete species regularly observed in the Gulf, based on five years (2011-2015) of survey effort from small boats. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.07.003DOI Listing

The Gulf of Ambracia's Common Bottlenose Dolphins, Tursiops truncatus: A Highly Dense and yet Threatened Population.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:259-296. Epub 2016 Aug 25.

University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

The common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) is the only cetacean present in the semiclosed waters of the Gulf of Ambracia, Western Greece. This increasingly degraded coastal ecosystem hosts one of the highest observed densities in the Mediterranean Sea for this species. Photo-identification data and tissue samples collected through skin-swabbing and remote biopsy sampling techniques during boat-based surveys conducted between 2006 and 2015 in the Gulf, were used to examine bottlenose dolphin abundance, population trends, site fidelity, genetic differentiation and toxicological status. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.07.002DOI Listing
March 2017
1 Read

The Rough-Toothed Dolphin, Steno bredanensis, in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea: A Relict Population?

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:233-258. Epub 2016 Sep 7.

North Atlantic & Mediterranean Sperm Whale Catalogue (NAMSC), London, United Kingdom.

Only recently included among the cetacean species thought to regularly occur in the Mediterranean, the rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis) is an obscure and enigmatic member of this ensemble. Preliminary genetic evidence strongly indicates an Atlantic origin, yet the Mediterranean distribution for this species is conspicuously detached from the Atlantic, with all authenticated records during the last three decades being east of the Sicilian Channel and most within the bounds of the Levantine Basin. These dolphins are apparently a small, relict population, probably the remnant of a larger one, contiguous with that in the Atlantic and nowadays entrapped in the easternmost and warmest province. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.07.005DOI Listing

Risso's Dolphin, Grampus griseus, in the Western Ligurian Sea: Trends in Population Size and Habitat Use.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:205-232. Epub 2016 Sep 24.

CIMA Research Foundation, Savona, Italy; University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.

This paper provides a summary of 25 years of research on Risso's dolphins (Grampus griseus) in the western Ligurian Sea. Seasonal variations in abundance, distribution and habitat use were observed. Photographic mark-recapture methods provided a population size estimate for the period from 1998 to 2012, of about 100 individuals (95% CI of 60-220 individuals). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.08.003DOI Listing

Conservation Status of Long-Finned Pilot Whales, Globicephala melas, in the Mediterranean Sea.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:173-203. Epub 2016 Aug 25.

CIRCE (Conservation, Information and Research on Cetaceans), Pelayo-Algeciras, Cádiz, Spain.

Mediterranean Sea long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are currently classified as Data Deficient on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. Multiple lines of evidence, including molecular genetic and photo-identification mark-recapture analyses, indicate that the Strait of Gibraltar population (distributed from 5.8°W longitude to west of Djibouti Bank and Alborán Dorsal in the Alborán Sea) is differentiated from the Mediterranean Sea population (east of Djibouti Bank and the Alborán Dorsal up to the Ligurian Sea). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.07.004DOI Listing

Conservation Status of Killer Whales, Orcinus orca, in the Strait of Gibraltar.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:141-172. Epub 2016 Aug 25.

CIRCE (Conservation, Information and Research on Cetaceans), Pelayo-Algeciras, Cádiz, Spain.

Killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the Mediterranean Sea are currently restricted to the Strait of Gibraltar and surrounding waters. Thirty-nine individuals were present in 2011, with a well-differentiated social structure, organized into five pods. Killer whale occurrence in the Strait is apparently related to the migration of their main prey, Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.07.001DOI Listing

Cuvier's Beaked Whale, Ziphius cavirostris, Distribution and Occurrence in the Mediterranean Sea: High-Use Areas and Conservation Threats.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:103-140. Epub 2016 Sep 14.

Politecnico di Milano, University of Technology, Milano, Italy; Tethys Research Institute, Milano, Italy.

Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris G. Cuvier, 1823) is the only beaked whale species commonly found in the Mediterranean Sea. Until recently, species presence in this area was only inferred from stranding events. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.07.007DOI Listing
March 2017
2 Reads

Marine Mammals in the Mediterranean Sea: An Overview.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;75:1-36. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Tethys Research Institute, Acquario Civico, Milano, Italy. Electronic address:

Despite being a small part of the world's oceans, the Mediterranean Sea hosts a diverse marine mammal fauna, with a total of 28 different species known to occur, or to have occurred, in the region. Species currently recognised as regular in the Mediterranean-the Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus monachus) and 11 cetaceans (fin whale, Balaenoptera physalus; sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus; Cuvier's beaked whale, Ziphius cavirostris; short-beaked common dolphin, Delphinus delphis; long-finned pilot whale, Globicephala melas; Risso's dolphin, Grampus griseus; killer whale, Orcinus orca; striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba; rough-toothed dolphin, Steno bredanensis; common bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus; harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena relicta) have adapted well to the region's environmental conditions, but their coexistence with humans is problematic. All the regular species are represented in the Mediterranean by populations genetically distinct from their North Atlantic relatives. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.08.005DOI Listing
March 2017
16 Reads

Preface.

Authors:
Barbara E Curry

Adv Mar Biol 2016;74:xxiii-xxiv

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2881(16)30025-6DOI Listing
December 2016
1 Read

Bioenergetics, Trophic Ecology, and Niche Separation of Tunas.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;74:199-344. Epub 2016 Aug 5.

Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico.

Tunas are highly specialized predators that have evolved numerous adaptations for a lifestyle that requires large amounts of energy consumption. Here we review our understanding of the bioenergetics and feeding dynamics of tunas on a global scale, with an emphasis on yellowfin, bigeye, skipjack, albacore, and Atlantic bluefin tunas. Food consumption balances bioenergetics expenditures for respiration, growth (including gonad production), specific dynamic action, egestion, and excretion. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.06.002DOI Listing
December 2016

Fish Ecology and Evolution in the World's Oxygen Minimum Zones and Implications of Ocean Deoxygenation.

Authors:
N D Gallo L A Levin

Adv Mar Biol 2016;74:117-98. Epub 2016 Jun 17.

Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States.

Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and oxygen limited zones (OLZs) are important oceanographic features in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean, and are characterized by hypoxic conditions that are physiologically challenging for demersal fish. Thickness, depth of the upper boundary, minimum oxygen levels, local temperatures, and diurnal, seasonal, and interannual oxycline variability differ regionally, with the thickest and shallowest OMZs occurring in the subtropics and tropics. Although most fish are not hypoxia-tolerant, at least 77 demersal fish species from 16 orders have evolved physiological, behavioural, and morphological adaptations that allow them to live under the severely hypoxic, hypercapnic, and at times sulphidic conditions found in OMZs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.04.001DOI Listing
December 2016

Acclimatization and Adaptive Capacity of Marine Species in a Changing Ocean.

Authors:
S A Foo M Byrne

Adv Mar Biol 2016;74:69-116. Epub 2016 Jul 9.

Schools of Medical and Biological Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

To persist in an ocean changing in temperature, pH and other stressors related to climate change, many marine species will likely need to acclimatize or adapt to avoid extinction. If marine populations possess adequate genetic variation in tolerance to climate change stressors, species might be able to adapt to environmental change. Marine climate change research is moving away from single life stage studies where individuals are directly placed into projected scenarios ('future shock' approach), to focus on the adaptive potential of populations in an ocean that will gradually change over coming decades. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.06.001DOI Listing
December 2016
1 Read

Decadal-Scale Forecasting of Climate Drivers for Marine Applications.

Adv Mar Biol 2016;74:1-68. Epub 2016 Jun 17.

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, TAS, Australia.

Climate influences marine ecosystems on a range of time scales, from weather-scale (days) through to climate-scale (hundreds of years). Understanding of interannual to decadal climate variability and impacts on marine industries has received less attention. Predictability up to 10 years ahead may come from large-scale climate modes in the ocean that can persist over these time scales. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.amb.2016.04.002DOI Listing
December 2016
3 Reads