10 results match your criteria Advanced Optical Materials[Journal]

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Pairing Toroidal and Magnetic Dipole Resonances in Elliptic Dielectric Rod Metasurfaces for Reconfigurable Wavefront Manipulation in Reflection.

Adv Opt Mater 2018 Nov 17;6(22):1800633. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser FORTH GR-71110 Heraklion Crete Greece.

A novel approach for reconfigurable wavefront manipulation with gradient metasurfaces based on permittivity-modulated elliptic dielectric rods is proposed. It is shown that the required 2π phase span in the local electromagnetic response of the metasurface can be achieved by pairing the lowest magnetic dipole Mie resonance with a toroidal dipole Mie resonance, instead of using the lowest two Mie resonances corresponding to fundamental electric and magnetic dipole resonances as customarily exercised. This approach allows for the precise matching of both the resonance frequencies and quality factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201800633DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369583PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Additive Manufacturing: Applications and Directions in Photonics and Optoelectronics.

Adv Opt Mater 2019 Jan 16;7(1):1800419. Epub 2018 Sep 16.

NEST Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR Piazza San Silvestro 12 I-56127 Pisa Italy.

The combination of materials with targeted optical properties and of complex, 3D architectures, which can be nowadays obtained by additive manufacturing, opens unprecedented opportunities for developing new integrated systems in photonics and optoelectronics. The recent progress in additive technologies for processing optical materials is here presented, with emphasis on accessible geometries, achievable spatial resolution, and requirements for printable optical materials. Relevant examples of photonic and optoelectronic devices fabricated by 3D printing are shown, which include light-emitting diodes, lasers, waveguides, optical sensors, photonic crystals and metamaterials, and micro-optical components. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201800419DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6358045PMC
January 2019

Programmable Microfluidic Synthesis of Over One Thousand Uniquely Identifiable Spectral Codes.

Adv Opt Mater 2017 Feb 18;5(3). Epub 2016 Oct 18.

Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158-2517, USA.

Encoded microparticles have become a powerful tool for a wide array of applications, including high-throughput sample tracking and massively parallel biological multiplexing. Spectral encoding, where particles are encoded with distinct luminescence spectra, provides a particularly appealing encoding strategy because of the ease of reading codes and assay flexibility. To date, spectral encoding has been limited in the number of codes that can be accurately resolved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201600548DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5604317PMC
February 2017
3 Reads

Enhancing the Angular Sensitivity of Plasmonic Sensors Using Hyperbolic Metamaterials.

Adv Opt Mater 2016 Nov 2;4(11):1767-1772. Epub 2016 Aug 2.

Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, 10600 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA; Department of Physics and CNR-NANOTEC UOS of Cosenza, Licryl Laboratory, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, Italy.

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors operate mainly on prism and grating coupling techniques, with spectral and angular scans being the two major interrogation schemes. Among them, the angular scan technique has several advantages including higher measurement precision owing to its higher signal-to-noise ratio. The currently available SPR sensor arrangements provide a maximum angular sensitivity of 500°-600° per RIU. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201600448DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5482536PMC
November 2016
4 Reads

Active Polymer Microfiber with Controlled Polarization Sensitivity.

Adv Opt Mater 2016 Mar 18;4(3):371-377. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, United States.

of an active polymer microfiber has been proposed and realized with the electrospun method. The fluorescence intensity guiding through this active polymer microfiber shows high sensitivity to the polarization state of the excitation light. What is more, the fluorescence out-coupled from tip of the microfiber can be of designed polarization state. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201500552DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4835039PMC
March 2016
16 Reads

Planar Photonic Crystal Biosensor for Quantitative Label-Free Cell Attachment Microscopy.

Adv Opt Mater 2015 Nov 22;3(11):1623-1632. Epub 2015 Aug 22.

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

In this study, a planar-surface photonic crystal (PC) biosensor for quantitative, kinetic, label-free imaging of cell-surface interactions is demonstrated. The planar biosensor surface eliminates external stimuli to the cells caused by substrate topography to more accurately reflect smooth surface environment encountered by many cell types in vitro. Here, a fabrication approach that combines nanoreplica molding and a horizontal dipping process is used to planarize the surface of the PC biosensor. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/adom.201500260
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201500260DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4750395PMC
November 2015
9 Reads

Complex Photonic Structures for Light Harvesting.

Adv Opt Mater 2015 Jun 25;3(6):722-743. Epub 2015 Mar 25.

European Laboratory for Non-linear Spectroscopy (LENS), Università di Firenze via Nello Carrara 1, 50019, Sesto Fiorentino, (FI), Italy ; Department of Physics, Università di Firenze via Nello Carrara 1, 50019, Sesto Fiorentino, (FI), Italy.

Over the last few years, micro- and nanophotonics have roused a strong interest in the scientific community for their promising impact on the development of novel kinds of solar cells. Certain thin- and ultrathin-film solar cells are made of innovative, often cheap, materials which suffer from a low energy conversion efficiency. Light-trapping mechanisms based on nanophotonics principles are particularly suited to enhance the absorption of electromagnetic waves in these thin media without changing the material composition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201400514DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4662022PMC
June 2015
17 Reads

Flexible Distributed Bragg Reflectors from Nanocolumnar Templates.

Adv Opt Mater 2015 Feb 17;3(2):171-175. Epub 2015 Feb 17.

Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universidad de Sevilla C/Américo Vespucio 49, Sevilla, 41092, Spain E-mail: ;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201400338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4558613PMC
February 2015
1 Read

Controlled, Bio-inspired Self-Assembly of Cellulose-Based Chiral Reflectors.

Adv Opt Mater 2014 Jul 30;2(7):646-650. Epub 2014 May 30.

Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2 1EW, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201400112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4515966PMC
July 2014
2 Reads

Selectively Patterning Polymer Opal Films via Microimprint Lithography.

Adv Opt Mater 2014 Nov 1;2(11):1098-1104. Epub 2014 Sep 1.

Nanophotonic Centre Cavendish Laboratory University of Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK E-mail:

Large-scale structural color flexible coatings have been hard to create, and patterning color on them is key to many applications, including large-area strain sensors, wall-size displays, security devices, and smart fabrics. To achieve controlled tuning, a micro-imprinting technique is applied here to pattern both the surface morphology and the structural color of the polymer opal films (POFs). These POFs are made of 3D ordered arrays of hard spherical particles embedded inside soft shells. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/adom.201400327
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adom.201400327DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4497474PMC
November 2014
4 Reads
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