363 results match your criteria Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal[Journal]


Subdissociative Ketamine Use in the Emergency Department.

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):E1

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000234DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Exploring Emergency Department Provider Experiences With and Perceptions of Weight-Based Versus Individualized Vaso-Occlusive Treatment Protocols in Sickle Cell Disease.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):86-97

School of Nursing, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (Ms Knight and Dr Onsomu); Department of Population Health Sciences (Dr Bosworth), Department of Medicine, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences (Dr Bosworth), Division of Hematology (Dr Crawford), Department of Medicine (Drs Crawford and Tanabe), and School of Nursing (Mss Knight and DeMartino and Drs Bosworth and Tanabe), Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Drs Glassberg and Richardson); Division of Hematology-Oncology (Dr Paice) and Feinberg School of Medicine (Dr Paice), Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; and Department of Emergency Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Dr Miller).

Treatment of vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) is the most common reason for emergency department (ED) treatment of sickle cell disease (SCD). We (1) compared perceptions of the usability and ability to manage VOE pain between ED nurses and other ED provider types, ED sites, and VOE protocols (individualized vs. weight-based), and (2) identified ED nurse and other provider protocol suggestions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000232DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6361535PMC
January 2020

Managing Acute Salicylate Toxicity in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):76-85

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

Salicylates are among the oldest and most widely used medication to date and are utilized for a variety of purposes including the management of fever, inflammation, pain, and cardiovascular prophylaxis. Reports from U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000227DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Improving Recognition and Treatment in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):65-75

Trauma/Surgical ICU, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (Dr Glann); Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies, Washington, District of Columbia (Dr Carman); Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina (Dr Thompson); and Raymond G. Murphy VA Medical Center, New Mexico, Albuquerque (Drs Olson, Nuttall, and Fleming and Ms Reese).

Alcoholism continues to be a persistent health problem in the United States, accounting for up to 62% of emergency department (ED) visits. This quality improvement (QI) project examined whether identifying the benefit for early use of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT C) and Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment of Alcohol Scale, Revised (CIW-ar) in the ED would avoid escalation of care and offset poor outcomes of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). A preimplementation chart review (N = 99) showed an average of 12%-15% of patients requiring escalation of care at the project site. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000226DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A Review of the Management of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):56-64

Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Kentucky HealthCare, Lexington.

Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis represent a spectrum of severe cutaneous adverse reactions that carry the potential for severe, long-term adverse effects, including death. Although medications are most commonly implicated in the development of these diseases, other factors, including infection and genetics, play a role. Management is generally supportive in nature and includes maintenance of the patient's airway, breathing, and circulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000225DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Oral Diclofenac Potassium Versus Intravenous Acetaminophen in Acute, Isolated, Closed-Limb Trauma.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):48-55

Emergency Medicine Research Center, Shariati Hospital (Drs Momeni, Vahidi, and Saeedi), Emergency Medicine Department (Drs Momeni, Vahidi, Badrizadeh, and Saeedi), and Internal Medicine Department (Dr Naderpour), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Pain control is an important concern in limb trauma. The most ideal agent for this purpose varies among different hospitals. The objective of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of oral diclofenac potassium versus intravenous acetaminophen in patients with limb trauma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000224DOI Listing
February 2019

Collaborative, Innovative Quality Improvement Activity: Development of Queensland Ambulance Service Stickers: Drivers, Approaches, Implementation, and Outcomes.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):43-47

Emergency Department, Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Hospital, Coopers Plains, Queensland, Australia (Ms Ding and Messrs Pink, Aitchison, and Brown); Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia (Mr Pink and Ms Tan); School of Nursing, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia (Ms Ding); and Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia (Ms Ding).

This article discusses the implementation of 3 targeted interventions aimed at reducing infection rates in patients due to prolonged in situ intravascular catheters (IVCs) during their admission to the hospital. These IVCs are inserted by paramedics with Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) in prehospital settings. The 3 interventions involved were the application of "QAS-IVC" stickers by QAS paramedics to indicate QAS-inserted IVCs, the implementation of mandatory IVC documentation during patient handover, and clinician engagement to provide patient education on IVC infection signs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000228DOI Listing
February 2019

Word Catheter Placement for Bartholin's Gland Abscess: Applications for Clinical Practice and Simulation.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):39-42

Mayo Clinic Simulation Center, Jacksonville, Florida (Ms Lannen); Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (Dr Destephano); and Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee (Dr Wilbeck).

For women who present with Bartholin's abscesses, placement of a Word catheter offers a minimally invasive approach for effective management in urgent care and emergency department settings. Although the procedure is relatively simple, the frequency of placement in the ED setting varies. Provider familiarity with both the device and the procedure can be enhanced using simulation techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000230DOI Listing
February 2019

Recognizing Fournier's Gangrene in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):33-38

Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia.

Fournier's gangrene is a rare disease with a significant mortality rate. The potentially fatal disease stems from both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and primarily occurs in men. The majority of Fournier's gangrene cases are idiopathic or derived from perineal and genital skin infections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000221DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Type A Aortic Dissection Complicated by Renal and Lower Extremity Malperfusion.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):23-32

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.

Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition with the potential for serious complications such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, paraplegia, renal failure, mesenteric ischemia, and limb ischemia. Emergency department clinicians must be aware of the potential ischemic complications of aortic dissection and act quickly to prevent irreversible organ damage and death. This article highlights a case of a 49-year-old man who developed renal and lower extremity malperfusion secondary to Stanford Type A aortic dissection. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=01261775-201901000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000220DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Subdissociative Ketamine Use in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):15-22

Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Nichols); and Emory University Hospital Midtown, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Paciullo).

Ketamine is an anesthetic known globally both for its potent dissociative properties and potential for abuse. More recently, ketamine demonstrates utility in a variety of disease states such as treatment-resistant depression, status asthmaticus, and acute agitation. In addition, ketamine has been shown to demonstrate various effects at different doses, which adds to its pharmacological benefit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000222DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Sever's Disease (Calcaneal Apophysitis).

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):10-14

School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, and Emergency Department, Heritage Valley Esmark, Sewickley, Pennsylvania (Dr Ramponi); and Heritage Valley Health System, Sewickley, Pennsylvania (Ms Baker).

Sever's disease, or calcaneal apophysitis, is the primary cause of heel pain in pediatric patients between the ages of 8 and 15 years. Primary risk factors in pediatric athletes are obesity and high levels of physical activity. Sever's injury primarily results from high-impact sports such as soccer, track, cross-country, gymnastics, tennis, and ballet. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000219DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Alcohol Use and Sexual Assault Among College Students: Implications for APRN Practice.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1):2-9

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

The Research to Practice column is designed to provide advanced practice nurses (APRNs) with an analysis of a current research topic with implications for practice change within emergency care settings. This review examines a recent study conducted by , titled "Emergency Department Visits for Sexual Assault by Emerging Adults: Is Alcohol a Factor?" The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of emergency department (ED) visits for sexual assault among a college-age population and found most patients were female (98%) and 70% were younger than 21 years. Additionaly, among those younger than 21 years, 74% reported alcohol use at the time of their assault and 62. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000233DOI Listing
February 2019

ENP Theme Issue: Worth the Read!

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jan/Mar;41(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000231DOI Listing
February 2019

Nonstandard Advance Health Care Directives in Emergency Departments: Ethical and Legal Dilemma or Reality: A Narrative Review.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):324-327

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Healthcare, Federation University, Mt Helen Campus, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.

People have tattooed themselves for thousands of years, and it remains popular with various groups across mainstream society. Although many people choose tattoos that express their life philosophy, epic events in their life, or their personal mantra, the use of tattooing in medicine such as a "do not resuscitate" tattoo is increasingly becoming more common (; ). As these tattoos do not meet the legal requirements for an advance health directive, they are at best a guide to the person's wishes and at worst a useless, painful exercise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000214DOI Listing
October 2018
20 Reads

Emergency Patients' and Family Members' Experiences of Nonconveyance Situations and Counseling Received From Care Providers.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):312-323

Hospital District of South Ostrobothnia, Seinäjoki, Finland (Drs Leikkola and Paavilainen); School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland (Dr Mikkola); School of Health Care and Social Work, Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences, Seinäjoki, Finland (Dr Salminen-Tuomaala); and University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland (Dr Paavilainen).

Making nonconveyance decisions can be demanding for care providers in prehospital emergency services. Studies have found homecare instructions and counseling of patients and family members partly insufficient. A descriptive cross-sectional design was applied for this pilot study to explore emergency patients' and family members' experiences of nonconveyance situations and counseling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000213DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Implementation of an Sexually Transmitted Disease-Screening Protocol in an Emergency Department: A Quality Improvement Project to Increase STD Screenings in Young Adults Aged 15-29 Years With Urinary Symptoms.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):304-311

Memorial Medical Center, Modesto, California; and Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland.

Urinary symptoms, such as dysuria, urinary urgency, frequency, and suprapubic pain, are frequent complaints made in the emergency department (ED; ). Although it is easy to relate urinary symptoms with a urinary tract infection (UTI), both UTI and sexually transmitted disease (STD) can share same urinary symptoms that mask each other from detection. It presents challenges for ED clinicians to precisely distinguish between two infections, causing misdiagnosis and mistreatment, resulting in patient morbidity and high health care costs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000212DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections.

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Amanda B Comer

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):296-303

Department of Emergency Medi-cine, Magnolia Regional Health Center, Corinth, Mississippi.

Skin and soft tissue infections are a common complaint seen in the emergency setting, with diagnosis traditionally made by history and physical examination alone. Cellulitis and cutaneous abscesses are often misdiagnosed. Because cellulitis and cutaneous abscesses can appear similar in presentation, they are often misdiagnosed and thus treated inappropriately. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000208DOI Listing
October 2018
10 Reads

Herpes Zoster in the Emergency Department: Potential for Severe Outcomes.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):285-295

University of San Diego, San Diego, California.

An estimated one million cases of herpes zoster are reported in the United States annually. Although most cases of herpes zoster are self-limiting and require little interventions, some occurrences can result in potentially debilitating and/or life-threatening outcomes. The purpose of this article is to discuss the incidence, potential complications, treatment, and preventive measures of herpes zoster. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000215DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Evaluation of Pain in the Cognitively Impaired Patient in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):278-284

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

The Research to Practice column is intended to improve the research critique skills of the advanced practice registered nurse and the emergency nurse, and to assist with the translation of research into practice. For each column, a topic and a research study are selected. The stage is set with a case presentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000207DOI Listing
October 2018
12 Reads

Treatment of Life-Threatening ACE-Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema.

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):E1

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000218DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Treatment of Life-Threatening ACE-Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):267-277

Department of Pharmacy, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (Drs Hirschy, Shah, and Rech); and Department of Pharmacy, Novant Health-Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (Dr Davis).

Incidence of angioedema associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) has been estimated at 0.1%-2.2% of patients receiving treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000211DOI Listing
October 2018
10 Reads

Emergency Department Presentation of a New-Onset Seizure: A Case Report.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):260-266

College of Nursing, Seattle University, Washington.

A seizure is a symptom of brain dysfunction, resulting in 1.6 million emergency department visits each year. The evaluation of new seizures in the emergency department is a process looking for triggers of seizures such as toxins, mass lesions, or metabolic derangements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000217DOI Listing
October 2018
9 Reads

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Emergency Complications and Evaluation: Practical Guide for the Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):246-259

Pulmonary Hypertension Program, University of Colorado Health, Aurora, Colorado (Ms Hohsfield); Pulmonary Vascular Disease Program, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Ms Archer-Chicko); Johns Hopkins Pulmonary Hypertension Program, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (Ms Housten); and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (Ms Harris Nolley).

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicates common diseases and can lead to worsening symptoms and increased mortality. A specific group of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), World Health Organization Group 1, may present to the emergency department (ED). We review common ED presentations of patients with PAH such as cardiac arrest/sudden death, right ventricular failure, syncope, hypoxemic respiratory failure, arrhythmias, hemoptysis, pulmonary embolism, chest pain/left main compression syndrome, infection, and considerations for PAH medication administration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000210DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6221388PMC
October 2018
10 Reads

From ENP Competencies to ENP Practice Standards.

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Oct/Dec;40(4):239

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000216DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Synthesis of Research Articles to Examine Reporting of the Educational Preparation and Practice Parameters of Emergency Nurse Practitioners.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):226-237

Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

It has been reported that the outcomes of care are affected not only by the educational preparation and experience of the practitioner but also by the parameters of his or her practice. Given differences that exist internationally in the enactment of the emergency nurse practitioner (ENP) role, a synthesis of research articles was conducted to examine the educational preparation and experience of ENPs, the role(s) they assume as determined by their patient population, and the outcomes used to evaluate their practice. The synthesis was informed by Sidani and Irvine's (1999) conceptual framework for evaluating the nurse practitioner role in acute care settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000202DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Exploring the Sexual Assault Response Team Perception of Interprofessional Collaboration: Implications for Emergency Department Nurses.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):214-225

University Health Center, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia (Dr Adams); and School of Nursing, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia (Dr Hulton).

There is little research on the dynamics of the sexual assault response team (SART) members' interprofessional collaboration (IPC) practice. The study purposes were to (1) explore the perceptions of IPC among SART members; (2) evaluate the use of Perception of Interprofessional Collaboration Model Questionnaire with the SART; and (3) discuss the implications of the Interprofessional Core Competencies for emergency department nurses and sexual assault nurse examiners. This cross-sectional mixed-methods study (n = 49) was implemented using 4 SART teams in a mid-Atlantic state. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000201DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads

Implementation of a Smoking Cessation Education Program in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):204-213

University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, Coral Gables, Florida.

Tobacco use is a major threat to public health. Current guidelines suggest that healthcare professionals in the emergency department provide routine smoking cessation screening and interventions. Evidence suggests that an educational intervention among registered nurses in the emergency department may increase education and referral for smoking cessation of patients who use tobacco products. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000200DOI Listing
October 2018
10 Reads

Interdisciplinary Design to Improve Fast Track in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):198-203

Emergency Department, New York-Presbyterian Hosptial-Columbia and Cornell, New York.

Delays in medical care will increase risks for patients. For this reason, timeliness of care is a public health priority and the one of the missions for this facility. The goal of this process improvement project was to enhance timeliness of care by restructuring fast track. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000199DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Educational Innovations for Continuing Education: JumpStart Modules for Advanced Practice Providers.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):194-197

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee.

There is increasing interest and evidence for the "flipped classroom" as a learner-centered approach to promote active engagement and enhance translation of knowledge into practice. However, there is little published work regarding application of the pedagogical approach to continuing education (CE) for advanced practice providers. The goal of CE is for providers to stay up-to-date with current best practices and skills, yet most CE activities employ teacher-centered, lecture-based methods focused on transmission of knowledge rather than application of knowledge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000198DOI Listing
October 2018
26 Reads

Maximizing Success With Rapid Sequence Intubations.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):183-193

Vanderbilt LifeFlight, Vanderbilt School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Within emergency care settings, rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is frequently used to secure a definitive airway (i.e., endotracheal tube) to provide optimal oxygenation and ventilation in critically ill patients of all ages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000204DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: A Challenging Diagnosis.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):176-182

Department of Adult Health Nursing (Dr Davis) and College of Nursing (Mr Schafer), University of South Alabama, Mobile; and PHI Air Medical, Phoenix, Arizona (Mr Schafer).

Stevens-Johnson syndrome is a rare, yet life-threatening, delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction characterized by mucocutaneous epidermal necrolysis. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a severe manifestation of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, defined as greater than 30% skin detachment. Stevens-Johnson syndrome with toxic epidermal necrolysis is characterized as an adverse cutaneous drug reaction and is associated with the use of sulfonamides, antiepileptics, and some classes of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000197DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

A 20-Year-Old-Trauma Patient With Suspected Malignant Hyperthermia Following Induction With Succinylcholine: A Case Study.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):171-175

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a life-threatening hypermetabolic state that can occur following induction with depolarizing neuromuscular blockade and volatile anesthesia gases. Because succinylcholine is a common choice for prehospital and emergency department inductions, it is important for staff to be able to recognize and effectively treat an MH crisis. This case study highlights a 20-year-old male trauma patient who presented to a Level I trauma center and was intubated for declining mental status. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000196DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Outpatient Treatment of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):162-170

Department of Emergency Medicine (Mr Schutz and Dr Watson) and Pharmacy Services (Dr Weant), Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; Charleston Southern University, Charleston, South Carolina (Mr Schutz); and Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Dr Hayden).

One of the most commonly treated infections in the emergency department (ED) is an uncomplicated urinary tract infection. Multiple classes of antibiotics are frequently used to treat this condition, but not all have equivalent efficacy, and many may confer risks to not only the patient but society as a whole if used on a large scale. These antibiotic selections should also be guided by local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, and general multidisciplinary recommendations for therapy should be developed on a local scale to assist prescribing patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000195DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Tibial Plateau Fractures.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):155-161

School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, and Emergency Department, Heritage Valley Sewickley, Pennsylvania (Dr Ramponi); and Med Express and US Acute Care Solutions, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Ms McSwigan).

Tibial plateau fractures can result from direct trauma or indirect compressive forces. These injuries often result in significant soft tissue disruption, ligamentous disturbance in addition to bone fractures. Diagnostic imaging findings in plain radiographs include fat-fluid level in the suprapatellar bursa, malalignment of the femoral condyles and tibial edges, and increased trabecular density in the lateral epicondyle. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000194DOI Listing
October 2018
16 Reads

Emergency Department Use of Intravenous Prochlorperazine for Acute Migraine.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):148-154

Emory Brain Health Center, and Department of Neurology, The Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia (Ms Cook); and Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Newberry).

The Research to Practice Column is designed to improve translational research critique skills of nurse practitioners (NPs). In this issue, the article "Randomized study of IV prochlorperazine plus diphenhydramine vs IV hydromorphone for migraine" is discussed in the context of a patient with an acute headache presenting to the emergency department (ED). The study was designed to assess the efficacy of intravenous prochlorperazine and diphenhydramine as compared with intravenous hydromorphone for patients with acute migraine in the ED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000203DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Building Bridges to Advance Specialty Practice: Updates and Accomplishments by the American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jul/Sep;40(3):145-147

Clinical Professor and Director of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner Program, School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia Guest Editor.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000205DOI Listing
July 2018
10 Reads

Comparison of Sepsis-3 Criteria Versus SIRS Criteria in Screening Patients for Sepsis in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):138-143

Wesley Medical Center, Wichita, Kansas.

The objective of our study was to assess the percentage of patients who met qSOFA criteria, SIRS criteria, both, or none of either criterion and received an International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code for sepsis after admission from the emergency department (ED). This was a single-center retrospective chart review of medical patients admitted through the ED. Patients were included if they were older than 18 years, were admitted to an inpatient unit through the ED, and received antibiotics within 48 hr of admission. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=01261775-201804000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000187DOI Listing
October 2018
12 Reads

Evaluation of Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) in Mechanically Ventilated in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):131-137

Department of Pharmacy Practice, (Dr Pop) University of Illinois College of Pharmacy Rockford, Illinois; Department of Pharmacy Services, (Drs, Dervay, and Dansby) and Emergency Department (Ms Jones), Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Florida.

The purpose of this study was to assess Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) goal implementation in mechanically ventilated patients sedated in the emergency department (ED), compliance with RASS, and goal achievement. This study was a retrospective chart review at a large Level I trauma academic medical center. Patients who were intubated in the ED or en route to the ED between October 1, 2013, and October 1, 2014, were eligible for inclusion if they met the following criteria: aged 18 years or older, 24 hr or more on mechanically ventilated support receiving continuous sedation and/or analgesia during the first 48 hr of admission, and a hospital stay of 6 days or more. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=01261775-201804000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000184DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

An Interprofessional Web-Based Teaching Module to Enhance Competency of the Advanced Practice Nursing Clinical Education in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):127-130

University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle (Drs Ro and Weiland); and Seattle University, Seattle, Washington (Drs Ro and Sin).

Many advanced practice registered nursing (APRN) students struggle to thrive in their clinical rotation due to the wide variability in their clinical knowledge. To address the variability and gaps in knowledge, we created an interprofessional web-based, self-directed curriculum for APRN students that is clinically relevant and specific to the emergency department (ED) rotation. The modules are a product of collaboration between the medical, nursing, and pharmacy faculty at an academic medical center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000185DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

An Emergency Medicine Residency for Nurse Practitioners: The New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medicine Experience.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):119-126

Division of Emergency Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Center (NYPH-WCMC), New York.

Growing numbers of nurse practitioners (NPs) are entering emergency medicine at a time when emergency departments are experiencing an increasing practice intensity and acuity. In this context, to further prepare NPs for a career in emergency medicine, postgraduate educational programs have emerged in the United States: from post-master's programs with 300-400 clinical hours in emergency medicine to intense residency or fellowship tracks with 2,000-3,000 clinical hours of training. This article describes the development and general organization of one such residency at New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Center, while also noting several broader trends in emergency medicine and emergency NPs in the workforce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000186DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Recognizing Measles, Mumps, and Rubella in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):110-118

Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies, Washington, District of Columbia.

Measles, mumps, and rubella have impacted millions of American lives over the last 100 years. During the last century, researchers have identified viral diseases, developed a combination vaccine, and have continued ongoing research when outbreaks have occurred. Despite the high incidence of vaccinated individuals, these highly communicable diseases continue to flourish within clusters of outbreaks throughout the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000190DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Ocular Chemical Burns Secondary to Accidental Administration of e-Cigarette Liquid.

Authors:
Yvonne McCague

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):104-109

Emergency Department, Regional Hospital Mullingar, Mullingar, Westmeath, Ireland.

Chemical burns to the eye represent a true ocular emergency, requiring immediate and proficient attention to preserve visual function. Although there have been very few reports of serious ocular burns secondary to the accidental administration of electronic cigarette liquid, this case report discusses the risk of same because of product confusion between electronic cigarette liquid and ocular preparations. This article presents a patient's case including patient history and management in the emergency department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000183DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Time Spent in the Emergency Department and Outcomes in Patients With Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):94-103

Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (Dr Hirschy); Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (Drs Sterk, Dobersztyn, and Rech); and College of Pharmacy, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois (Dr Dobersztyn).

A majority of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock are first evaluated in the emergency department (ED). Methods such as screening tools have proven advantageous in earlier identification, allowing for timely initiation of treatment. Delay in symptom presentation and ED overcrowding contribute to deferment of sepsis bundle components and admission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000188DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Pneumoperitoneum.

Authors:
Denise R Ramponi

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):87-93

School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania.

Pneumoperitoneum, usually seen as free air under the diaphragm, is a finding that can be seen on plain abdominal radiographs, signifying a leakage of air, usually from a perforation in the gastrointestinal tract. There are several other potential pathways from other body compartments for air to enter the abdominal cavity. Pneumoperitoneum does not always signify bowel rupture, as it can also result from pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax, and in patients who are being mechanically ventilated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000189DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Acute Headache in the Emergency Department: Is Lumbar Puncture Still Necessary to Rule Out Subarachnoid Hemorrhage?

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):78-86

Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia (Ms Steffens); and Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Drs Tucker and Evans).

The purpose of the Research to Practice column is to review current primary journal articles that directly affect the practice of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in the emergency department. This review examines the findings of Carpenter et al. (2016) from their article, "Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Describing the Diagnostic Accuracy of History, Physical Exam, Imaging, and Lumbar Puncture With an Exploration of Test Thresholds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000191DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Emergency Nurse Practitioners State by State: A Call to Action.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Apr/Jun;40(2):73-77

Editor Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal Founder, American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners, Professor of Clinical Nursing & Director of Emergency/Trauma Nurse Practitioner Concentration, University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, TX.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000192DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Evaluating an Order Set for Improvement of Quality Outcomes in Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2018 Jan/Mar;40(1):59-72

Columbus Regional Health, Midtown Medical Center, Columbus, Georgia (Dr Joyner Blair); School of Nursing, Troy University, Montgomery, Alabama (Dr Hamilton); and School of Nursing, Troy University, Troy, Alabama (Dr Spurlock).

The timely management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is essential to avoid lengthy hospitalizations and poor clinical outcomes. There is often an absence of ownership for glycemic management in hospitalized patients, most notably in those with a diagnosis other than diabetes. Evidence supports the use of evidence-based DKA protocols. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000178DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads