Search our Database of Scientific Publications and Authors

I’m looking for a

    292 results match your criteria Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal[Journal]

    1 OF 6

    Postgraduate Emergency Nurse Practitioner Fellowships: Opportunities for Specialty Education.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jul/Sep;39(3):224-230
    Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee.
    Specialty trained emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs) can meet the demands of an unpredictable emergency care environment within an overburdened health care system. Although existing literature supports fellowship training as a method for bridging academic knowledge with clinical experiences for the novice nurse practitioner, the currently available emergency care postgraduate fellowship programs are inconsistent in approach. Building upon descriptive data provided by the existing 9 postgraduate ENP fellowship programs, a comparison and gap analysis of program content was conducted to identify perceived standards for ENP specialty education and the congruence with published ENP competencies. Read More

    Importance of Early Detection and Cardiovascular Surgical Intervention in Marfan Syndrome.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jul/Sep;39(3):217-223
    Texas Woman's University, Houston, Texas (Dr DelloStritto and Mss Chemmachel, Patel, Skolkin, Gilani, and Uleanya); and Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas (Dr Branham).
    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder that affects multiple systems, including the skeletal, ligamentous, oculofacial, pulmonary, abdominal, neurological, and cardiovascular systems. Cardiovascular complications, which involve the aorta and aortic valve, contribute most significantly to patient morbidity and mortality. A literature review was conducted on pathophysiology of the disease and recommendations for early diagnosis and treatment. Read More

    Implementing Interprofessional Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment in the Emergency Department: An Evidence-Based Quality Improvement Initiative.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jul/Sep;39(3):199-216
    School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois (Drs Bacidore and Letizia); and Health and Community Systems Department, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (Dr Mitchell).
    Alcohol misuse is one of the leading causes of illness, disease, injury, and death in the Unites States. For many patients, the emergency department (ED) visit may provide the only therapeutic opportunity to influence problematic drinking behavior. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is an evidence-based approach that may reduce alcohol-related morbidity and mortality and improve health outcomes and quality of life. Read More

    Chemical Burns of the Eye.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jul/Sep;39(3):193-198
    School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania.
    Chemical burns of the eye are one of the most common eye injuries. The extent of the ocular surface damage is influenced by the type, temperature, volume, and pH of the corrosive substance and duration of exposure. Limbal ischemia found on eye assessment is the primary determinant of eventual visual outcome. Read More

    Cerebellar Stroke: A Missed Diagnosis.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jul/Sep;39(3):184-192
    School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Dr Berry); School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Dr Platt-Mills); Emergency Department, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Drs Berry and Platt-Mills and Mss Rafferty and Tiu).
    Cerebellar strokes account for less than 10% of all strokes but lead to significantly poor outcomes. Cerebellar strokes that are initially missed have a mortality rate of 40%, and half of the patients who survive have long-term deficits. The patient's history may provide clues that point to a cerebellar stroke. Read More

    Update on Sepsis Treatment in the Emergency Department.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jul/Sep;39(3):176-183
    Pharmacy Services, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Dr Weant); Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Kentucky HealthCare, Lexington (Dr Bailey); and Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington (Dr Bailey).
    Sepsis continues to be a devastating, costly, and challenging syndrome to manage in emergency departments (ED) across the nation, and its impact seems to be only increasing. Recently, consensus recommendations have made some profound changes in the way we approach, classify, and treat sepsis. The ED serves as an important initial screening and intervention point for sepsis, and ED care can have a profound impact on overall morbidity and mortality. Read More

    Metatarsal Stress Fractures.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jul/Sep;39(3):168-175
    School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania (Dr Ramponi); and Department of Nursing, Edinboro University, Edinboro, Pennsylvania (Drs Hedderick and Maloney).
    Metatarsal stress fractures are also called "march fractures" or "marcher's foot." They most commonly occur in the distal second and third metatarsals. The second and third metatarsals receive the majority of stress during ambulation and are less mobile compared with the other metatarsals. Read More

    Prevalence of Pulmonary Embolism in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department for Syncope.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jul/Sep;39(3):161-167
    Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
    The Research to Practice column is intended to improve the research critique skills of the advanced practice registered nurse and the emergency nurse (RN) and to assist with the translation of research into practice. For each column, a topic and a research study are selected. The research article is then reviewed and critiqued, and the findings are discussed in relation to a patient scenario. Read More

    The Utility of Point-of-Care Testing at Emergency Department Triage by Nurses in Simulated Scenarios.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Apr/Jun;39(2):152-158
    Center for Healthcare Innovation and Policy Research (Dr Pines and Mr Zocchi), Department of Emergency Medicine (Dr Pines), and School of Medicine and Health Sciences (Ms Buchanan), The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia; Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Wisconsin-Madison (Dr Shah); and School of Nursing (Dr Travers) and Department of Emergency Medicine (Dr Travers), The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    We developed and tested simulated patient scenarios to assess how normal or abnormal point-of-care (POC) test results at triage change prioritization decisions. This was a cross-sectional study where our team developed simulated scenarios and presented them to triage nurses from 3 academic medical centers. Twenty-four scenarios were constructed on the basis of 12 clinical indications from a protocol previously developed by our team. Read More

    Emergency Nurse Practitioner Core Educational Content.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Apr/Jun;39(2):141-151
    Emergency Nurse Practitioner Program, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee (Drs Wilbeck and Rudy); Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois (Dr Roberts); and Vanderbilt Adult Emergency Department, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (Dr Rudy).
    Increasing numbers of patients are presenting to national emergency departments (EDs). This is occurring simultaneously with reductions in providers along with ED closures, creating a significant gap in emergency care. According to the advanced practice registered nurse consensus model, specialty-specific knowledge and practice build upon generalist nurse practitioner (NP) population foci. Read More

    Application of Primary Care Guideline for Chronic Low Back Pain in the Emergency Department.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Apr/Jun;39(2):123-140
    Thomas More College, Crestview Hills, Kentucky, (Dr Tacy); and University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio (Drs Donaworth and Ballman).
    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a primary care condition that overflows into the emergency department (ED). No ED-specific practice guideline exists for the management of patients with CLBP in the ED setting. Back pain is a common chief complaint, with cases of CLBP making up to 50% of the patients seen with back pain in an urban, freestanding ED affiliated with a multicampus health system in the Midwest where 25% of patients live below the poverty line and 21. Read More

    Measuring Fatigue in Triage: A Pilot Study.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Apr/Jun;39(2):114-122
    Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina (Ms McMahon and Drs Hudson, Prewitt, and Carman); and Duke University Health System, Raleigh, North Carolina (Ms Engleson).
    : Given the critical nature of triage in facilitating emergency department (ED) functions, an understanding of the factors that impact triage nurses' ability to accurately assign triage scores and the ways in which these factors may affect various patient outcomes is extremely important; yet, there exists a paucity of such research in the literature. To further develop this knowledge base, an investigation of triage nurse fatigue and the role it may play in the ability to accurately assign triage scores was developed. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine how the length of a triage shift affects perceived fatigue levels among triage nurses. Read More

    A Case of Exertional Rhabdomyolysis: When Exertion Exceeds Capacity.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Apr/Jun;39(2):106-113
    Mid-Atlantic Emergency Medicine Associates, Charlotte, North Carolina (Dr Jordan); School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte (Dr Jordan); and Western Carolina University and Haywood Regional Hospital, Clyde, North Carolina (Dr Mannle).
    The purpose of this article is to present a discussion of a young adult patient with exertional rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis is the process of muscle tissue destruction and damage to the cell membrane, with subsequent release of the intracellular myocyte contents into the systemic circulation. This leads to the potential for the life-threatening systemic complications of electrolyte abnormalities, cardiac dysrhythmias, acute kidney injury, compartment syndrome, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Read More

    Antiemetic Use in the Emergency Department.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Apr/Jun;39(2):97-105
    Pharmacy Services, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Drs Weant and Calhoun); Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Kentucky HealthCare, Lexington (Drs Bailey and Baum); Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington (Drs Bailey and Baum); and Clinical Pharmacy Services, St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead, Kentucky (Dr Justice).
    Nausea and vomiting are 2 of the most common complaints of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED). In addition, antiemetics are the most commonly prescribed medications in the ED behind analgesics. Treating these conditions can be complex, especially as one considers that nausea and/or vomiting could be the primary presenting illness or simply a symptom of a more complex etiology. Read More

    Management of Hand Injuries: Part III.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Apr/Jun;39(2):86-96
    Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, Beyster Institute for Nursing Research, University of San Diego, San Diego, California (Dr Hoyt) University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston (Dr Ramirez).
    Assessment of Acute Hand Injuries was discussed in Part I (). Part I reviewed approaches to the assessment of the patient with a hand injury and established a process for basic identification of the hand structures and function. Approaches to history taking and specific evaluations for the hand were discussed, and examples of the assessments were provided. Read More

    Is Subdissociative Ketamine As Safe and Effective As Morphine for Pain Management in the Emergency Department?
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Apr/Jun;39(2):81-85
    Emergency Services, University of Kentucky HealthCare, Lexington (Dr Kunz Howard); and Department of Emergency Medicine at Grady Hospital, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Ms Gisness).
    : Review of recent evidence with translation to practice for the advanced practice nurse (APN) role is presented using a case study module for "Intravenous Subdissociative-Dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Analgesia in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial." This prospective, randomized controlled inquiry enrolled 90 patients into 2 groups (ketamine vs. morphine) for patients seeking care in an emergency department with acute pain. Read More

    Emergency Nurses as Second Victims of Error: A Qualitative Study.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jan/Mar;39(1):68-76
    Medical Ethics and Law Research Center (Drs Abbaszadeh and Borhani), Department of Medical Surgical Nursing (Dr Ajri-Khameslou), School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    There are many nurses who are victims of errors in the hospital environment. It is quite essential to perceive the outcome of mistakes in nurses' profession. The aim of this scientific study was to interpret the causes that place nurses in danger of errors in emergency departments and also the consequences resulting from confronting the errors in the job environment. Read More

    An Exemplar Interprofessional Academic Emergency Nurse Practitioner Program: A Blueprint for Success.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jan/Mar;39(1):59-67
    Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (Dr Evans); Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University and Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, GA (Ms Ashooh); Georgia Baptist College of Nursing, Mercer University, Atlanta, GA (Dr Kimble); Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (Dr Heilpern).
    Emergency department census rates and manpower gaps have continued to rise over the past decade, creating a demand for well-prepared emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). The implementation of the consensus model for advanced practice nurses has brought acknowledgment by leading health care, physician, and nursing organizations of the ENP specialty as critical to building a high-quality emergency care workforce. Recognition of the ENP's unique skill set, and therefore need of specialty certification, has led to a growing interest in the expansion of nurse practitioner curricula in emergency care. Read More

    Initiation of Therapeutic Hypothermia in the Emergency Department: A Quality Improvement Project.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jan/Mar;39(1):52-58
    St John Medical Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma (Dr Yochum); and Missouri State University, Springfield (Dr Utley).
    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) postresuscitation has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA) since 2005. Early initiation of TH and fast achievement of goal temperatures have been associated with better neurological outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific TH protocol for the emergency department (ED) in increasing ED use of TH and decreasing the time from return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) to initiation of cooling measures. Read More

    Identification and Management of Human Trafficking Victims in the Emergency Department.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jan/Mar;39(1):31-51
    Department of Nurse-Midwifery and Women's Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (Dr Hachey); and Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee (Dr Phillippi).
    Health care practitioners serve an important role in identification and assistance of human trafficking victims. Advanced practice registered nurses, including certified nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, and nurse practitioners, are in a unique position to interact with persons trafficked and seen in the clinical setting, yet they require knowledge to identify the signs of human trafficking. Lack of training and education has been identified as a barrier for health care professionals to recognize human trafficking victims and implement needed health care services (; ). Read More

    Metformin-Associated Lactic Acidosis: An Atypical Presentation.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jan/Mar;39(1):26-30
    Department of Emergency Medi-cine, North Shore University Health Systems, Evanston, Illinois.
    Many Type 2 diabetic patients take metformin for its safety profile and lack of hypoglycemia. Although this drug is safe in those without renal dysfunction, lactic acidosis may rarely occur. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis is a potentially fatal yet rare diagnosis. Read More

    Chemotherapy in the Emergency Department? There Is a Role for That: Methotrexate for Ectopic Pregnancy.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jan/Mar;39(1):18-25
    Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Drs Weant and Calhoun); Departments of Pharmacy Services and Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky HealthCare, University of Kentucky, Lexington (Drs Bailey and Baum); and Clinical Pharmacy Services, St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead, Kentucky (Dr Justice).
    Approximately 1.6% of all emergency department (ED) visits in the United States are for vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy, translating to around 500,000 ED visits per year. A potentially life-threatening condition, ectopic pregnancy occurs in 1. Read More

    An Unusual Case of Chest Pain in an Adolescent Male: Important Cues to Differential Diagnosis.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jan/Mar;39(1):10-17
    The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina (Dr Jordan); and Haywood Regional Hospital Clyde, North Carolina (Dr Mannle).
    Chest pain is a common presenting symptom in the pediatric population, and in contrast to adults, the etiology is rarely cardiac or life-threatening. The majority of chest pain complaints in children and adolescents are benign and can be managed with reassurance and follow-up. The emergency care provider must obtain a comprehensive history and physical examination, as the differential diagnosis of pediatric chest pain is extensive and serious underlying organic pathology may be present. Read More

    Caring for Young Children Exposed to Marijuana.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2017 Jan/Mar;39(1):3-9
    Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
    This article reviews the research report, Marijuana Exposure Among Children Younger Than Six Years in the United States (), and, using a case study approach, applies the findings to advanced practice registered nurses. B. extracted data from the National Poison Data System showing an increasing trend in marijuana exposure in children, especially in states where marijuana has been legalized for either medicinal use or recreational use. Read More

    Reducing Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing for Adults With Acute Bronchitis in an Urgent Care Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):327-335
    Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Link and Hendrix); FastMed Urgent Care, Holly Springs, North Carolina (Dr Link); Department of Pharmacy, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical (Dr Townsend), and Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (Dr Hendrix), Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina; FastMed Urgent Care, Henderson, North Carolina (Dr Leung); and FastMed Urgent Care, Clayton, North Carolina (Dr Kommu).
    Acute bronchitis is a predominantly viral illness and, according to clinical practice guidelines, should not be treated with antibiotics. Despite clear guidelines, acute bronchitis continues to be the most common acute respiratory illness for which antibiotics are incorrectly prescribed. Although the national benchmark for antibiotic prescribing for adults with acute bronchitis is 0%, a preliminary record review before implementing the intervention at the project setting showed that 96% (N = 30) of adults with acute bronchitis in this setting were prescribed an antibiotic. Read More

    Recognition of Asymptomatic Hypertension in an Urban Emergency Department: Where Are We Now?
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):320-326
    Department of Emergency Medi-cine, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York (Drs Souffront and Richardson and Ms Gestal); and New York University College of Nursing, New York (Dr Melkus).
    Persistently elevated blood pressure ([BP]; hypertension [HTN]) occurs at higher rates in the emergency department ([ED]; 44%) than in the general population (27%) and disproportionately affects black patients and older adults. The American College of Emergency Physicians recommends referral to primary care for HTN confirmation and management when patients are asymptomatic and their BP is persistently elevated (). However, adherence to this clinical policy is suboptimal. Read More

    The Triage Interruptions Assessment Tool: An Instrument Development.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):308-319
    College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (Drs Johnson and Gillespie); and Emergency Department, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio (Dr Vance).
    Interruptions contribute to catastrophic errors in health care. Interruptions are breaks in the performance of a human activity initiated by a source internal or external to the recipient. Errors during the initial triage assessment can lead to errors in estimating the acuity of a patient and resources required for appropriate care. Read More

    Unique Educational Needs of Emergency Nurse Practitioners.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):300-307
    Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois (Drs Keough, Tell, and Andreoni); and Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (Dr Tanabe).
    The purpose of this study is to identify the unique educational needs of emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). A survey from 167 nurse practitioners (NPs) practicing in the emergency department (ED) settings was analyzed. A variety of certified NPs practice in EDs: family NPs (30%), adult NPs (18%), acute care NPs (40%), and some with 2 or more certifications (12%). Read More

    Presentation of Testicular Torsion in the Emergency Department.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):295-299
    University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio.
    Testicular torsion is a urological emergency affecting 3.8 per 100,000 males younger than 18 years. Differential diagnosis of the acutely painful scrotum is crucial for the advance practice nurse to understand. Read More

    A Review on the Reversal of the Old and New Anticoagulants.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):279-294
    University of Kentucky HealthCare, Lexington (Drs Bailey, Blackburn, and Horn); University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington (Dr Bailey); Charleston Area Medical Center, Charleston, West Virginia (Drs Crowley and Schultz); University of Charleston School of Pharmacy, Charleston, West Virginia (Drs Crowley and Schultz); West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, Morgantown (Drs Crowley and Schultz); and St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead, Kentucky (Dr Justice).
    It is not uncommon for providers in the emergency department to take care of patients who are taking anticoagulant therapy in the outpatient setting. However, the bigger challenge is caring for these patients when they present with bleeding that could be secondary to 1 or more of these medications. In recent years, this class of medications has expanded from warfarin to include direct thrombin inhibitors and Factor Xa inhibitors. Read More

    Management of Hand Injuries: Part II.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):266-278
    University of Texas Health Science Center Houston (Dr Ramirez); and Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science: Beyster Institute for Nursing Research, University of San Diego, San Diego, California (Dr Hoyt).
    Hand injuries are a frequent emergency department occurrence and account for most upper extremity injuries. Proper assessment and management of hand injuries can reduce morbidity and prevent long-term disability. "Assessment of Acute Hand Injuries" Part I was discussed in the Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal (). Read More

    Does Persistent Pain Following a Motor Vehicle Crash Impact Functional Status in Older Adults?
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):259-265
    Emergency Services, University of Kentucky HealthCare, Lexington (Mr Proud and Dr Howard); and University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington (Mr Proud).
    Review of recent evidence with translation to practice for the advanced practice nurse (APN) role is presented using a case study module for "Persistent Pain Among Older Adults Discharged Home From the Emergency Department After Motor Vehicle Crash: A Prospective Cohort Study." This longitudinal inquiry enrolled 161 patients 65 years or older seeking care in an emergency department (ED) following a motor vehicle crash. Interviews were conducted at the initial ED visit and at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Read More

    Standards of Practice for Emergency Nurse Practitioners.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):255-258
    Co-Director Family Nurse Practitioner, Track and Associate Clinical Professor, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA; Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Atlanticare Regional Medical Center, Atlantic City, NJ Assistant Professor, Duke University School of Nursing, Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Clinical Associate Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Emory Healthcare, Atlanta, GA Clinical Professor, University of San Diego, Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science: Beyster Institute for Nursing Research, San Diego, CA; Emergency Nurse Practitioner, St. Mary Medical Center, Long Beach, CA; Editor, Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal, Wolters Kluwer, Philadelphia, PA Section NP/PA Director, Schumacher Clinical Partners, Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Citizens Medical Center, Victoria, TX; Clinical Instructor, UTHealth School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas Professor Clinical Nursing and Director Emergency/Trauma NP Concentration, UTHealth School of Nursing, Houston Texas; President/Founder American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners Assistant Professor, Marcella Niefhoff School of Nursing, Loyola University, Chicago, IL; Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL Emergency Nurse Practitioner CHI, St Luke's Memorial San Augustine Hospital, San Augustine, TX; Instructor UTHealth School of Nursing, Houston, TX Associate Professor & ENP Specialty Director, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, TN Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine; UTHealth McGovern School of Medicine, Houston, TX.

    Scope of Practice for Emergency Nurse Practitioners.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Oct/Dec;38(4):252-254
    Co-Director Family Nurse Practitioner Track and Associate Clinical Professor, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA; Emergency Nurse Practitioner. Atlanticare Regional Medical Center, Atlantic City, NJ Assistant Professor, Duke University School of Nursing, Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Clinical Associate Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Emory Healthcare, Atlanta, GA Clinical Professor, University of San Diego, Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science: Beyster Institute for Nursing Research, San Diego, CA; Emergency Nurse Practitioner, St. Mary Medical Center, Long Beach, CA, Editor, Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal, Wolters Kluwer, Philadelphia, PA Section NP/PA Director, Schumacher Clinical Partners, Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Citizens Medical Center, Victoria, TX; Clinical Instructor, UTHealth School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas Professor Clinical Nursing and Director Emergency/Trauma NP Concentration, UTHealth School of Nursing, Houston Texas; President/Founder American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners Assistant Professor, Marcella Niefhoff School of Nursing, Loyola University, Chicago, IL; Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL Emergency Nurse Practitioner CHI St Luke's Memorial San Augustine Hospital, San Augustine, TX; Instructor UTHealth School of Nursing Houston, TX Associate Professor & ENP Specialty Director, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, TN Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine, UTHealth McGovern School of Medicine, Houston, TX.

    Can Team Triage Improve Patient Flow in the Emergency Department? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Jul-Sep;38(3):233-50
    United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong (Dr Ming and Ms Lau); and Blue Shield of California, San Francisco (Mr Lai).
    This systematic review was performed as a feasibility study for revamping the triage service of an emergency department (ED) in a district hospital. In view of the overcrowding problem that plagues EDs worldwide, we reviewed evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine whether ED team triage improves patient flow in comparison with single-nurse triage. We measured improvement in patient flow in terms of the reduction in length of stay (LOS) or wait time (WT) for all ED patients. Read More

    Dental Procedures.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Jul-Sep;38(3):228-32
    School of Nursing and Health Sciences at Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Emergency Department and Convenient Care settings at Heritage Valley Health System in Sewickley, Pennsylvania.
    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Read More

    The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner's Interactions Within the Sexual Assault Response Team: A Systematic Review.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Jul-Sep;38(3):213-27
    Department of Nursing Practice Program (Dr Hulton), Doctor of Nursing Practice Student (Ms Adams), James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.
    Many emergency department nurses care for the sexually assaulted victim, when sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) programs are not available. Therefore, it is important for emergency department nurses to understand the roles of both the SANE and the sexual assault response team (SART). The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the current research on the integration of the SANE among the SART and evaluate the gaps in research of the SANE's role, attitude, behavior, and satisfaction within the collaborative SART. Read More

    Shift in Emergency Department Provider Attitudes Toward Patients With Sickle Cell Disease.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Jul-Sep;38(3):199-212
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Freiermuth and Tanabe); Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Silva and Tanabe); and Department of Emergency Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (Dr Cline).
    Patients with sickle cell disease frequently seek care in the emergency department. They have reported experiencing negative attitudes from emergency providers. This study was undertaken to evaluate change in emergency provider attitudes toward patients with sickle cell disease over a 2. Read More

    Case Report: Postpartum Cough and Dyspnea.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Jul-Sep;38(3):190-8
    University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia.
    Peripartum/postpartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare condition associated with pregnancy in which there is left ventricular (LV) dysfunction resulting in symptoms of heart failure (). This occurs in previously healthy women and is seen in the last month of pregnancy or during the first 5 months postpartum (). Incidence ranges from 1 in 1,300 to 1 in 15,000 pregnancies in the United States (). Read More

    N-Acetylcysteine Use in Non-Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Failure.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Jul-Sep;38(3):183-9
    Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Louisville Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky (Drs McPheeters and VanArsdale); and Department of Pharmacy Services, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Dr Weant).
    This article will review the available evidence related to the management of non-acetaminophen induced acute liver failure with N-acetylcysteine. Randomized controlled trials and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The efficacy of N-acetylcysteine in the treatment of acute liver failure from causes other than acetaminophen toxicity was evaluated. Read More

    Dislocation of the Temporomandibular Joint and Relocation Procedures.
    Adv Emerg Nurs J 2016 Jul-Sep;38(3):177-82
    Department of Nursing, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro (Drs White and Hedderick); Emergency Department and Occupational Medicine Department, St. Vincent's Health System, Erie, Pennsylvania (Dr White); School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Ramponi); and Emergency Department and Convenient Care settings at Heritage Valley Health System, Sewickley, Pennsylvania (Dr Ramponi).
    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation requires prompt medical attention due to the crucial impact of airway, nutrition acquisition, and communication. Recognition of this injury by the practitioner, based on clinical presentation and history, is paramount for identification of accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment of TMJ dislocation. Relocation or reduction methods vary on the basis of the severity of the injury and whether it is an acute or chronic dislocation. Read More

    1 OF 6