429 results match your criteria Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal[Journal]


The Metrics of Acute Care Reentry and Emergency Department Visits by Recently Discharged Inpatients.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):150-160

Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick (UNB) Fredericton, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada (Dr Hodgins and Ms Filiatreault); and Emergency Department, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada (Ms Fraser).

Research on acute care reentry by recently discharged inpatients has generally focused on hospital readmissions, with less attention given to presentations to the emergency department (ED). This omission results in underestimation of the extent of reentry and its impact on ED patient volumes and flow. This project involved an analysis of administrative data to examine the rate of ED presentations by recently discharged inpatients using 3 time metrics-within 0-3 days, 0-7 days, and 0-30 days of discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000293DOI Listing

Iranian Nurses' Experiences of Workplace Violence in Prehospital Emergency Care: A Qualitative Study.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):137-149

Medical Education Research Center (Dr Rahmani), Nursing and Midwifery Faculty (Dr Dadashzadeh), and Center of Qualitative Studies, School of Nursing and Midwifery (Dr Hassankhani), Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; Medical-Surgical Department, Nursing & Midwifery Faculty, Tabriz, East Azerbaijan Province, Iran (Drs Rahmani and Hassankhani and Dr Dadashzadeh); Griffith University, School of Medicine, Queensland, Australia (Dr Boyle); Faculty of Medical Sciences, Nursing Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran (Dr Mohammadi); and School of Nursing, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (Dr Campbell).

Prehospital emergency care nurses experience severe workplace violence. However, despite the widespread violence they experience, this phenomenon has not been well studied among these nurses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of Iranian nurses working in prehospital setting regarding workplace violence with a focus on the factors leading to such violence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000292DOI Listing

Impact of Advanced Practice Prehospital Programs on Health Care Costs and ED Overcrowding: A Literature Review.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):128-136

University of Arizona, Tucson.

Health care costs in the United States continue to increase, requiring solutions that permit safe, quality care with a lower financial investment. Utilization of the emergency department for nonemergent care is considered to be one of the costliest, and most preventable methods of health care delivery. This review seeks to demonstrate how advanced practice prehospital programs can potentially decrease the cost of health care without sacrificing quality or safety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000291DOI Listing

A Review of Central Venous Access Using Ultrasound Guidance Technology.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):119-127

University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, Coral Gables, Florida.

More than 5 million central lines are placed in the United States each year. Advanced practice providers place central lines and must understand the importance of ultrasound guidance technology. The use of anatomic landmarks to place central lines has been employed in the past and in some instances is still used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000297DOI Listing

Allopurinol-Induced Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms: A Case Report.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):108-118

College of Nursing, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama.

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is an uncommon yet serious adverse cutaneous drug reaction that results from a hypersensitivity reaction. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms is often misdiagnosed because of vague and confounding signs and symptoms. The most common clinical manifestations of DRESS are shared with many other diseases and include rash, lymphadenopathy, and fever. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000298DOI Listing

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Angioedema.

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):E6

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000303DOI Listing

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Angioedema.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):103-107

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing.

Angioedema from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is a potential, emergent, and frightening problem that presents to the emergency department. This article focuses on angioedema caused by using ACEIs. The presentation, pathology, diagnostic testing, treatment, and patient education of angioedema are explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000294DOI Listing

Ketamine for Migraine in the Emergency Department.

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):E4-E5

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000301DOI Listing

Ketamine for Migraine in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):96-102

Olathe Medical Center, Olathe, Kansas (Drs Bilhimer and Holmes); and UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (Dr Groth).

Ketamine is utilized often in the emergency department (ED) for rapid sequence intubation, procedural sedation, and acute pain management. The treatment of migraine headache in the ED varies widely and is dependent on several factors including migraine cause, previous successful abortive methods, and provider preference. Several medications are currently employed to treat acute migraine including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, triptans, antihistamines, prochlorperazine, and corticosteroids, among others. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000296DOI Listing

Vaping: What Every Emergency Nurse Practitioner Should Know!

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):90-95

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Cerepani); Pittsburgh Poison Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Lynch); Division of Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine and Divisions of Adolescent & Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Lynch); School of Nursing & Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania (Dr Ramponi); and Convenient Care settings, Heritage Valley Health System, Sewickley, Pennsylvania (Dr Ramponi).

As of December 10, 2019, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 2,668 hospitalized cases of lung injury and 60 deaths associated with use of electronic nicotine delivery systems, or "vaping." In many cases, patients required multiple health care visits prior to diagnosis. Recognition of the risk factors, symptoms, and examination findings that have been consistently reported is critical to making the diagnosis and initiating treatment early in the progression of disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000295DOI Listing

Death and Dying in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):81-89

Emory University Nell Hodgson School of Nursing, Atlanta Georgia (Mr Geller and Dr Evans); and Emory University Hospital, Atlanta Georgia (Dr Evans).

The Research to Practice column is intended to improve the research critique skills of the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) and to assist with the translation of research into practice. For each column, a topic and a particular research study are selected. The stage is set with a case presentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000299DOI Listing

American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners Mourns Loss of Founder.

Authors:
Jennifer Wilbeck

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Apr/Jun;42(2):79-80

Associate Professor & Emergency Nurse Practitioner Specialty Coordinator Vanderbilt University School of Nursing Nashville, TN Guest Editor.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000300DOI Listing

Effects of Video Discharge Instructions on Patient Understanding: A Prospective, Randomized Trial.

Authors:
Zebulon L Wilkin

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):71-78

William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Previous studies demonstrated that patients have difficulty understanding and retaining discharge instructions due to the lack of time spent counseling patients and low health literacy rates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of video instructions on patient understanding of their discharge instructions. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled trial of a convenience sample conducted in a military hospital emergency department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000279DOI Listing
January 2020

Improved Concussion Discharge Instructions in a Pediatric Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):63-70

Emergency Department (Drs Keenan, Lapidus, and Smith and Ms Chenard) and Injury Prevention Center (Mr Lapidus), Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford; and Fairfield University, Connecticut (Dr Lovanio).

Pediatric concussions are common and many children seek care in emergency departments. Providing concussion discharge instructions to patients and families is part of routine standard of care. The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of the Acute Concussion Evaluation-Emergency Department Discharge Instructions (ACE-ED DI) improves the caregiver's knowledge of injury management, specifics about returning to school and sports activities, and outpatient follow-up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000280DOI Listing
January 2020

Evaluation of the (qSOFA) Tool in the Emergency Department Setting: Nurse Perception and the Impact on Patient Care.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):54-62

Clinical Education Department, Ballad Health, Johnson City, Tennessee (Dr Proffitt); and Capstone College of Nursing, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (Dr Hooper).

In the emergency department (ED) setting, nurses perform the initial evaluation of patients, thereby placing ED nurses in a prime position to recognize sepsis and greatly influence prompt implementation of treatment. The quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) tool was first introduced as part of the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) as a predictor of both increased mortality and longer intensive care unit (ICU) stays. Designed for use outside the ICU, the qSOFA tool functions as a simple bedside tool to quickly identify patients at risk for developing sepsis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000281DOI Listing
January 2020

Noninvasive Wound Closure in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):48-53

Creighton University College of Nursing, Omaha, Nebraska.

Emergency department (ED) providers spend a significant amount of time treating low-acuity medical conditions, such as simple laceration repairs. Lacerations account for 5% of all ED visits in the United States (). An extended period of time by the provider is required for traditional wound repair, and there is perceived pain reported by patients (). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000282DOI Listing
January 2020

Marijuana Use: Early Recognition for a Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):30-36

California State University Los Angeles.

There is an emerging subset of patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS). Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a relatively new clinical condition and despite a long documented marijuana use in humans, little is known about the pathophysiology of this emerging problem. The focus of this article is to present a patient who presented with CHS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000283DOI Listing
January 2020

Management of Acute Idiopathic (Viral) Pericarditis in the Emergency Department: A Review for the Nursing Professional.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):17-29

Department of Pharmacy, Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (Drs Schwier and Skrepnek); and INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (Dr Cannedy).

Acute pericarditis is an inflammatory disorder that contributes to chest pain admissions in the emergency department (ED). Nursing professionals can play a vital role in the differential, triage and management of acute pericarditis in the ED. First-line pharmacotherapy to specifically treat acute pericarditis of viral or idiopathic origin is paramount in improving patients' quality of life and reducing the risk of further recurrences of pericarditis and consists of combination therapy with aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [ASA]) or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), in combination with colchicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000284DOI Listing
January 2020

Fibromatosis Colli: A Case Report.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):13-16

University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital, Illinois.

Fibromatosis colli is a rare, usually self-limiting condition caused by a benign tumor in the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The tumor occurs most often during infancy and can be clinically associated with torticollis. Accurate diagnosis of fibromatosis colli is important to avoid unnecessary invasive interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000285DOI Listing
January 2020

Acute Treatment of Pediatric Migraine: A Review of the Updated Guidelines.

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):E1-E2

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000289DOI Listing
January 2020

Acute Treatment of Pediatric Migraine: A Review of the Updated Guidelines.

Authors:
Calli Cook

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):4-12

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

The purpose of the Research to Practice column is to review and critique current research articles that directly affect the practice of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in the emergency department. This review examines the findings of M. from their article, "Practice guideline update summary: Acute treatment of migraine in children and adolescents: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000286DOI Listing
January 2020

AAENP Celebrates 5 Years!

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):1-3

Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal Professor & Director NP/ENP Programs, University of San Diego Founding Member and Past Board Member, American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners Professor and Director, ENP Specialty, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners Director Emergency/Trauma Nurse Practitioner Program, Cizik School of Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000288DOI Listing
January 2020

Atypical Variant of Cutaneous Tuberculosis Presentation in an Adult HIV-Infected Patient in an Emergency Department in Haiti.

Authors:
Cara Fratianni

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2020 Jan/Mar;42(1):37-47

School of Nursing and Health Science, University of San Diego, San Diego, California and Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla, San Diego, California.

The incidence of tuberculosis (TB) has increased in the 21st century due to a high prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and multidrug-resistant (MDR) pulmonary TB. HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, and other immune deficiencies decrease cure rates, increase mortality, and increase the incidence of MDR pulmonary TB. Tuberculosis is the most virulent opportunistic pathogen worldwide for patients living with HIV. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000287DOI Listing
January 2020

Nursemaid's Elbow Reduction.

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):E4

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000273DOI Listing

Implementation of a Team-Focused High-Performance CPR (TF-HP-CPR) Protocol Within a Rural Area EMS System.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):348-356

Department of Emergency Medicine, Northern Hospital of Surry County, Mount Airy, North Carolina (Mr McHone and Dr Edsall); University of South Alabama, Mobile (Mr McHone and Dr Gunn); and Carroll County Fire and Rescue, Hillsville, Virginia (Mr McHone and Lineberry).

Team-focused, high-performance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TF-HP-CPR) improves the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) events. In 2010, the American Heart Association began endorsing TF-HP-CPR (). A rural-area Virginia emergency medical services (EMS) system receives assistant medical oversight from an emergency nurse practitioner (ENP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000259DOI Listing
April 2020
1 Read

Safe Management of Nausea and Vomiting During Pregnancy in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):336-347

School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

Nausea and vomiting during pregnancy are a frequent complaint in the emergency department, with a significant economic burden on the patient and health care system. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) in January 2018 released an updated practice bulletin discussing the latest guidelines to managing nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. This article discusses the incidence, prevalence, and economic costs regarding medical visits for pregnancy-associated nausea and vomiting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000258DOI Listing

Nursemaid's Elbow Reduction.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):330-335

Emergency Nurse Practitioner Program, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee.

Nursemaid's elbow, also known as radial head subluxation, is a common childhood orthopedic injury that can easily be diagnosed and reduced by the advanced practice nurse. It is most common in children 1-4 years of age and typically occurs as the result of a pulling mechanism on an outstretched arm. This leads to subluxation of the radial head at the annular ligament. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000270DOI Listing

Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: A Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):322-329

College of Nursing, University of South Alabama, Mobile.

Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressing soft tissue infection associated with a high rate of mortality. Vibrio vulnificus, a gram-negative bacillus found in warm seawater, is a rare but serious cause of necrotizing fasciitis. Definitive treatment is often delayed because of the vague clinical manifestations associated with the early stages of the disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000268DOI Listing

Encephalopathic Presentation of West Nile Virus Neuroinvasive Disease Confounded by Concomitant History of Acute Alcohol Withdrawal.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):316-321

Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Dr Profita); College of Nursing, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Dr Haglund); and Froedtert & Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Dr Haglund).

West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) is a rare and severe manifestation of West Nile virus (WNV) infection that occurs in less than 1% of infected persons. It should be considered in patients who present with fever, neurological symptoms, and a history of recent outdoor activity where mosquitoes were active. This article highlights a case of a 55-year-old man whose history and symptoms of WNND were confounded with an alternate diagnosis, acute alcohol withdrawal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000266DOI Listing

A Practical Guide for Managing Antibiotic Allergies in the Emergency Department.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):306-315

College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Albany (Dr Chastain); and Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital, Albany, Georgia (Drs Chastain and Sams and Mr Steele).

Up to 30% of patients report at least one antibiotic allergy, but oftentimes these antibiotic allergies are misdiagnosed. In fact, of the 10% of patients reporting penicillin allergies, 90%-98% are not truly allergic. In an era of increasing antibiotic resistance coupled with a limited number of new antibiotics, evaluating antibiotic allergies is critical in providing optimal patient care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000264DOI Listing

The Use of Ultrasonography in the Emergency Department to Screen Patients After Blunt and Penetrating Trauma: A Clinical Update for the Advanced Practice Provider.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):290-305

University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, Coral Gables, Florida. (Drs González, Ortega, Crenshaw, de Tantillo); and Jacksonville University, Keigwin School of Nursing, Jacksonville, Florida (Dr de Tantillo).

Use of bedside ultrasonography to identify life-threatening injuries for patients with blunt and penetrating trauma is the standard of care in the emergency department. The "FAST" examination-focused assessment with sonography for trauma-ultrasound scan of the chest and abdomen allows clinicians to assess critical regions for free fluid without use of invasive procedures as quickly and as often as needed. In addition, ultrasonography has a high degree of sensitivity and specificity and is safe during pregnancy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000267DOI Listing
April 2020
1 Read

Are Pelvic Exams Necessary Anymore?

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):282-289

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University Atlanta, Georgia.

This article, "Is the pelvic examination still crucial in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with vaginal bleeding or abdominal pain when an intrauterine pregnancy is identified on ultrasonography? A randomized controlled trial," by J. A. ) seeks to determine whether excluding a pelvic examination among patients presenting to the ED with first-trimester vaginal bleeding or lower abdominal pain, and indication of intrauterine pregnancy recorded on ultrasound increases morbidity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000269DOI Listing
April 2020
1 Read

Moving the Emergency Nurse Practitioner Specialty from Resistance to Acceptance: The Wyoming Experience.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):279-281

Assistant Professor and ENP Program Director, College of Nursing, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama Guest Editor.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000265DOI Listing

Leveraging a Public Health Framework and Community Advisory Board to Innovate Workplace Violence Intervention Strategies.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Oct/Dec;41(4):357-371

College of Nursing (Drs Gillespie, Smith, and Martsolf) and School of Criminal Justice (Dr Fisher), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of Emergency Medicine (Dr Kennebeck and Ms Griffith) and Psychiatric Intake Response Center (Ms Richey), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio (Ms Matern); University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington (Mr Pendleton); and TriHealth, Cincinnati, Ohio (Ms Cubbage).

Even with extensive evidence documenting the incidence, risk factors, and negative outcomes of workplace violence (WPV) against emergency department (ED) employees, there is a lack of intervention strategies reported that could be subjected to a clinical trial in the ED setting. The purpose of this article is to report the outcomes of a novel process adapted from the Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health for soliciting intervention strategies from a WPV Community Advisory Board (CAB) organized by the U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000263DOI Listing

Choosing the Correct "-ase" in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Alteplase, Tenecteplase, and Reteplase.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):271-278

Michigan Neurology Associates, PC, Detroit (Dr Dillon); Virginia Commonwealth University Health, Richmond (Dr Stevens); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis (Dr Dusenbury); and Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, California (Ms Massaro and Drs Toy and Purdon).

Alteplase is a tissue plasminogen activator approved for treating acute ischemic stroke (AIS), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and acute massive pulmonary embolism. Two additional tissue plasminogen activators, tenecteplase and reteplase, are also approved for AMI treatment. However, neither tenecteplase nor reteplase is approved for AIS treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000254DOI Listing
January 2020
6 Reads

Improving the Care of Individuals With Sickle Cell Disease in the Emergency Department Using a Quality Improvement Framework: The Emergency Department Sickle Cell Assessment of Needs and Strengths (ED-SCANS).

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):261-270

School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Brennan-Cook and Tanabe and Ms Bonnabeau); and Emergency Department, Duke University Health Systems, Durham, North Carolina (Ms Harris-Bloom).

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a severe chronic disease that leads to premature mortality caused by serious complications of the disease such as acute chest syndrome, stroke, and sepsis. Patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with pain due to vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) are at a higher risk for complications, making it imperative that emergency nurses, nurse practitioners, and physicians are knowledgeable about SCD and understand the other associated complications besides VOC. Because of the complexity of disease and misperceptions about SCD among ED nurses, physicians, and nurse practitioners, a quality improvement (QI) framework for treatment of adults with SCD in EDs was developed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000256DOI Listing
January 2020
4 Reads

Using Survivors' Voices to Guide the Identification and Care of Trafficked Persons by U.S. Health Care Professionals: A Systematic Review.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):244-260

College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Dr Armstrong); and Institute for Healthcare and Human Trafficking, Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Greenbaum).

Evidence suggests that trafficked persons in the United States frequently seek health care, yet little is known of their experiences, including reasons for seeking assistance, interactions with professionals, and barriers to obtaining care. To gain a better understanding, a search was conducted for empirical data collected directly from trafficked persons about their US health care experiences, published in peer-reviewed journals within the past 10 years, and in the English language. Four databases were searched and of the 1,605 articles initially identified, 8 met all inclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000257DOI Listing
January 2020
21 Reads

Advanced Practice Provider Burnout in a Large Urban Medical Center.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):234-243

Emory University Department of Emergency Medicine at Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia.

Burnout is characterized by 3 facets: the presence of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a lack of sense of personal accomplishment. It arises when stress becomes so severe relative to a person's own resources that he or she loses motivation to perform, and it is associated with many negative outcomes. Emergency medicine (EM) physicians ranked highest in a study of burnout rates among physician subspecialties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000255DOI Listing
January 2020
1 Read

Dental Pain Relief in the Age of ALTO.

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Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):E3

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000262DOI Listing
January 2020

Dental Pain Relief in the Age of ALTO.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):229-233

School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (Dr Wilbeck). Dr May is Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Smyrna, Tennessee.

The opioid public health crisis necessitates that health care providers seek alternatives to opioid pain control. For patients presenting with dental pain, a dental nerve block provides effective, long-lasting pain relief without the use of opioid pain medications. This article presents the techniques required to safely and effectively administer 3 types of dental nerve blocks, allowing the emergency nurse practitioner to provide effective pain control to patients with dental pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000260DOI Listing
January 2020

Kawasaki Disease in Infancy.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):222-228

Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, University of San Diego, San Diego, California.

Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute vasculitis that primarily affects young children and, if untreated, is associated with development of coronary artery aneurysms in approximately 25% of those affected. Infants, especially those younger than 6 months, often have atypical (incomplete) presentations of KD and are most at risk for development of aneurysms. Identification of KD requires a careful and thorough history and physical examination because multiple other conditions cause similar findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000253DOI Listing
January 2020
7 Reads

An Atypical Case of Abdominal Pain in a Toddler: A Diagnostic Challenge.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):215-221

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina; and Mid-Atlantic Emergency Medicine Associates, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Abdominal pain in the pediatric patient presents a unique diagnostic challenge for emergency department (ED) providers due to the wide range of possible etiologies and sequelae. The list of differential diagnoses is extensive and includes the spectrum of conditions that range from benign and self-limiting to those that are potentially life-threatening. This article describes a case of a young toddler with an acute appendicitis complicated by perforation and abscess formation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000248DOI Listing
January 2020
1 Read

Orolingual Angioedema After Tissue Plasminogen Activator Administration in Patients Taking Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):204-214

Department of Pharmacy, University of Louisville Hospital, Kentucky.

Orolingual angioedema is a rare adverse effect (1%-5%) of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) that can lead to significant morbidity in patients with acute ischemic stroke. It is thought that increased levels of bradykinin and histamine resulting from tPA administration can result in angioedema. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors can also lead to increased levels of bradykinin and appear to be a risk factor for tPA-associated angioedema. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=01261775-201907000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000250DOI Listing
January 2020
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Mallet Finger.

Adv Emerg Nurs J 2019 Jul/Sep;41(3):198-203

School of Nursing, Education, and Human Studies, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania.

This article provides an overview of issues associated with traumatic injury to the distal finger that results in extensor tendon disruption or bony avulsion at the base of the distal phalanx. Commonly referred to as mallet finger, drop finger, or baseball finger, terminal extensor tendon injuries are a common presentation to the emergency department. Providers need to be advised of evidence-based management of these extensor tendon injuries in order to prevent decreased function and permanent deformity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TME.0000000000000251DOI Listing
January 2020
13 Reads