803 results match your criteria Adv. Dent. Res.[Journal]


Empowering Women Researchers in the New Century: IADR's Strategic Direction.

Adv Dent Res 2019 12;30(3):69-77

International Association for Dental Research; University of Utah Health Sciences, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Gender inequality in science, medicine, and dentistry remains a central concern for the biomedical research workforce today. Although progress in areas of inclusivity and gender diversity was reported, growth has been slow. Women still face multiple challenges in reaching higher ranks and leadership positions while maintaining holistic success in these fields. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877385DOI Listing
December 2019

Have Women Broken the Glass Ceiling in North American Dental Leadership?

Adv Dent Res 2019 12;30(3):78-84

Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

In the last few decades, the number of women graduating from North American (NA) dental schools has increased significantly. Thus, we aimed to determine women's representation in leadership positions in NA dental and specialty associations/organizations, dental education, and dental journals, as well as the proportion of men/women researcher members of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR). We contacted NA dental associations to provide us with the total number and the men/women distribution of their members. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877397DOI Listing
December 2019

Gender Inequalities in the Dental Workforce: Global Perspectives.

Adv Dent Res 2019 12;30(3):60-68

University of Utah Health Sciences, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

The aim of this review is to investigate the growth of diversity and inclusion in global academic dental research with a focus on gender equality. A diverse range of research methodologies were used to conduct this review, including an extensive review of the literature, engagement of key informants in dental academic leadership positions around the world, and review of current data from a variety of national and international organizations. Results provide evidence of gender inequalities that currently persist in dental academics and research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877398DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6960321PMC
December 2019

Then and Now-A Look Inside the Lives of 11 Women Presidents of the IADR.

Authors:
L Shaddox A Letra

Adv Dent Res 2019 12;30(3):95-118

Department of Diagnostic and Biomedical Sciences, Center for Craniofacial Research, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, TX, USA.

Extraordinary women scientists-past, current, and elected presidents of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR)-showcase pathways for success and leadership. In this series of autobiographical essays, these women of various cultural backgrounds with diverse areas of research describe their journeys in the passionate pursuit of excellence, despite the frequent obstacles and challenges. Through interviews and in their own words, we recap highlights of their dental research journeys and inspirations, their career trajectories toward the IADR presidency, and the benefits and challenges that they faced in their careers and personal lives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877394DOI Listing
December 2019

Commentary: Challenges and Opportunities for Women in Dental Research.

Adv Dent Res 2019 12;30(3):119-123

Consultant, Bethesda, MD, USA.

This commentary integrates and expands on the preceding articles in this issue that document and celebrate a century of women's achievements in the International Association for Dental Research (IADR). The increasing participation and leadership of women in dental and craniofacial research and within the IADR were viewed from the perspective of a changing culture of science. The steps that have been taken by the IADR to develop greater inclusiveness are acknowledged, and some of the challenges that remain are discussed in terms of obstacles that are most often social or cultural in origin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877395DOI Listing
December 2019

Celebrating the IADR's Women Pioneers: Pathways for a New Century of Success.

Adv Dent Res 2019 12;30(3):58-59

Department of Community Dentistry and Population Health, School of Dental Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519880489DOI Listing
December 2019

Women Recipients of IADR Distinguished Scientist Awards.

Adv Dent Res 2019 12;30(3):85-94

Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Distinguished Scientist Awards are prestigious recognitions of outstanding scientific accomplishments in various areas of dental, oral, and craniofacial research, which correspond to several of the IADR Scientific Groups and Networks. These 17 awards were established over a period of 60 y. The objective of this report is to highlight women recipients of IADR Distinguished Scientist Awards. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877390DOI Listing
December 2019

Precision Reengineering of the Oral Microbiome for Caries Management.

Authors:
J L Baker X He W Shi

Adv Dent Res 2019 11;30(2):34-39

The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Technological advancements have revolutionized our understanding of the complexity and importance of the human microbiome. This progress has also emphasized the need for precision therapeutics, as it has underscored the dilemmas, such as dysbiosis and increasing antibiotic resistance, associated with current, broad-spectrum treatment modalities. Dental caries remains the most common chronic disease worldwide, accompanied by a tremendous financial and social burden, despite widespread and efficacious fluoride and hygienic regimens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877386DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6806128PMC
November 2019

Searching Deep and Wide: Advances in the Molecular Understanding of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease.

Authors:
K Divaris

Adv Dent Res 2019 11;30(2):40-44

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

During the past decades, remarkable progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular basis of the 2 most common oral diseases, dental caries and periodontal disease. Improvements in our knowledge of the diseases' underlying biology have illuminated previously unrecognized aspects of their pathogenesis. Importantly, the key role of the oral (supragingival and subgingival) microbiome is now well recognized, and both diseases are now best understood as dysbiotic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877387DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6806129PMC
November 2019

Oral Cancer: Integration of Studies for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Precision.

Adv Dent Res 2019 11;30(2):45-49

Department of Pharmacology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Head and neck cancers are among the 10 most common cancers in the world and include cancers of the oral cavity, hypopharynx, larynx, nasopharynx, and oropharynx. At least 90% of head and neck cancers are squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). This summary discusses the integration of clinical and mechanistic studies in achieving diagnostic and therapeutic precision in the context of oral cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877388DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6806126PMC
November 2019

Precision Health: Bringing Oral Health into the Context of Overall Health.

Adv Dent Res 2019 11;30(2):31-33

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Unprecedented advances in genomics, data science, and biotechnology have ushered in a new era of health care in which interventions are increasingly tailored to individual patients. Precision-based approaches extend to oral health, which is essential to overall health. Harnessing the full potential of precision oral health will depend on research to more fully understand the factors that underlie health and contribute to disease-including the human genome, microbiome, epigenome, proteome, and others. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877392DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6891819PMC
November 2019

Advances in Precision Oral Health Research.

Authors:
M E Ryan R Garcia

Adv Dent Res 2019 11;30(2):28-30

Boston University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519879059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6960320PMC
November 2019

Oral Rehabilitation of Patients Sustaining Orofacial Injuries: The UPenn Initiative.

Adv Dent Res 2019 11;30(2):50-56

Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery & Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Tissue injuries in the oral and maxillofacial structures secondary to trauma, warfare, ablative cancer, and benign tumor surgery result in significant losses of speech, masticatory and swallowing functions, aesthetic deformities, and overall psychological stressors and compromise. Optimal oral rehabilitation remains a formidable challenge and an unmet clinical need due to the influence of multiple factors related to the physiologic limitations of tissue repair, the lack of site and function-specific donor tissues and constructs, and an integrated team of multidisciplinary professionals. The advancements in stem cell biology, biomaterial science, and tissue engineering technologies, particularly the 3-dimensional bioprinting technology, together with digital imaging and computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies, have paved the path for personalized/precision regenerative medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519877400DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6806127PMC
November 2019
1 Read

Oral Health Effects of Tobacco Products: Science and Regulatory Policy.

Authors:
S L Tomar

Adv Dent Res 2019 10;30(1):2-3

Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519872481DOI Listing
October 2019

Oral Health Effects of Combusted and Smokeless Tobacco Products.

Adv Dent Res 2019 10;30(1):4-10

Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

The oral cavity is usually the first part of a consumer's body exposed to the constituents of tobacco products or their emissions. Consequently, the oral cavity is a frequent site for carcinogenic, microbial, immunologic, and clinical effects of tobacco use. This article summarizes 5 presentations on various aspects of oral health affected by combusted or noncombusted tobacco products from a recent conference, "Oral Health Effects of Tobacco Products: Science and Regulatory Policy," sponsored by the American Association for Dental Research and the Food and Drug Administration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519872480DOI Listing
October 2019
1 Read

In Vitro Models, Standards, and Experimental Methods for Tobacco Products.

Adv Dent Res 2019 10;30(1):16-21

Institute for In Vitro Sciences, Gaithersburg, MD, USA.

Traditional tobacco products have well-known systemic and local oral effects, including inflammation, vasoconstriction, delayed wound healing, and increased severity of periodontal disease. Specifically in the oral cavity and the lung, cigarette smoking produces cancer, increased infectivity, acute and chronic inflammation, changes in gene expression in epithelial lining cells, and microbiome changes. In recent years, cigarette smoking has greatly decreased in the United States, but the use of new tobacco products has gained tremendous popularity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519872474DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6755716PMC
October 2019
5 Reads

Novel Nicotine Delivery Systems.

Adv Dent Res 2019 10;30(1):11-15

College of Dentistry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.

Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are devices that contain a power source, a heating element, and a tank or cartridge containing an "e-liquid," which is a mixture of nicotine and flavoring in a glycerol-propylene glycol vehicle. Their increasing popularity among adolescents might be attributed to aggressive marketing in physical venues, social media outlets, as well as irreversible changes caused by nicotine in the developing brains of youth and young adults, predisposing them to addictive behaviors. Adolescent ENDS users were 4 times more likely to initiate cigarette smoking, and the odds of quitting smoking were lower and, in many instances, delayed for those using ENDS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519872475DOI Listing
October 2019

Looking Back and Ahead: The Food and Drug Administration's Regulation of the Tobacco Industry and Next-Generation Products.

Authors:
M Jacob

Adv Dent Res 2019 10;30(1):22-25

Jacob Strategies LLC, Washington, DC, USA.

Regulatory policy toward tobacco significantly affects oral health because tobacco use is a driver of diseases that manifest themselves in or near the oral cavity. Tobacco use in the United States has been associated with millions of cases of periodontal disease. Researchers have identified the role of combusted and noncombusted tobacco products in promoting cancers of the head and neck, leading to disease and premature death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034519872472DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6755717PMC
October 2019
1 Read

Guidelines for Fluoride Intake: First Discussant.

Adv Dent Res 2018 03;29(2):177-178

1 Department of Cariology, Operative Dentistry and Dental Public Health, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750590DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Summary of General Discussion and Conclusions.

Authors:
F V Zohoori

Adv Dent Res 2018 03;29(2):183-185

1 School of Health & Social Care, Teesside University, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750591DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

Understanding Optimum Fluoride Intake from Population-Level Evidence.

Adv Dent Res 2018 03;29(2):144-156

1 Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health (ARCPOH), The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.

Policy on fluoride intake involves balancing caries against dental fluorosis in populations. The origin of this balance lies with Dean's research on fluoride concentration in water supplies, caries, and fluorosis. Dean identified cut points in the Index of Dental Fluorosis of 0. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517750592
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750592DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads

Introduction: Guidelines for Fluoride Intake-Are They Appropriate?

Authors:
A J Rugg-Gunn

Adv Dent Res 2018 03;29(2):142-143

1 Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750588DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

Current Guidance for Fluoride Intake: Is It Appropriate?

Authors:
I Mejàre

Adv Dent Res 2018 03;29(2):167-176

1 Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.

The purpose of this report is to examine critically the appropriateness of the current guidance for fluoride intake in the population (0.05-0.07 mg F/kg bodyweight/d), consider whether changes to the current guidance are desirable, and suggest further research that will strengthen the evidence base for future decisions on guidance/advice in this area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750589DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Guidelines for Fluoride Intake: Second Discussant.

Authors:
A W G Walls

Adv Dent Res 2018 03;29(2):179-182

1 Edinburgh Dental Institute, Edinburgh, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750594DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Review of Fluoride Intake and Appropriateness of Current Guidelines.

Authors:
M A R Buzalaf

Adv Dent Res 2018 03;29(2):157-166

1 Department of Biological Sciences, Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil.

Since the classical epidemiological studies by Dean, it has been known that there should be an optimum level of exposure to fluoride that would be able to provide the maximum protection against caries, with minimum dental fluorosis. The "optimal" daily intake of fluoride for children (0.05-0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750850DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Silver Fluoride as a Treatment for Dental Caries.

Authors:
J A Horst

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):135-140

1 Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Medical management of caries is a distinct treatment philosophy that employs topical minimally invasive therapies that treat the disease and is not merely prevention. This strategy is justified as an alternative or supplement to traditional care by significant disease recurrence rates following comprehensive operative treatment under general anesthesia. Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is one agent to enable effective noninvasive treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517743750DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6699125PMC
February 2018
5 Reads

Stannous Fluoride Effects on Gene Expression of Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):124-130

3 The Procter and Gamble Company, Mason Business Center, Mason, OH, USA.

A genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed to elucidate the bacterial cellular response of Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus to NaF and SnF. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of SnF were predetermined before microarray study. Gene expression profiling microarray experiments were carried out in the absence (control) and presence (experimental) of 10 ppm and 100 ppm Sn (in the form of SnF) and fluoride controls for 10-min exposures (4 biological replicates/treatment). Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517737027
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737027DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Recent Advances in Remineralization Therapies for Caries Lesions.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):55-59

1 Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Remineralization of caries lesions is naturally achieved by salivary ions, and it can be enhanced by external factors or elements such as fluoride. Numerous studies have demonstrated the remineralizing efficacy of fluoride therapies as well as the limitations with some groups of the population. Consequently, developing new remineralization therapies to close this gap in efficacy has been a priority for the last 2 decades. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517740124
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517740124DOI Listing
February 2018
36 Reads

Erythritol Functional Roles in Oral-Systemic Health.

Authors:
P de Cock

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):104-109

1 DGH Nutrition Innovation, Keerbergen, Belgium.

Erythritol belongs chemically to the family of polyols (or sugar alcohols), yet it is metabolized by animals and humans very differently compared to all other polyols. While polyols have been used traditionally (for about 80 y) to replace sugar in sweet foods to reduce demineralization of tooth enamel and to reduce postprandial blood glucose levels, benefits achieved merely through the absence of sugar, emerging evidence shows that erythritol can play a number of functional roles to actively support maintenance of oral and systemic health. Oral health studies revealed that erythritol can reduce dental plaque weight, reduce dental plaque acids, reduce counts of mutans streptococci in saliva and dental plaque, and reduce the risk for dental caries better than sorbitol and xylitol, resulting in fewer tooth restorations by dentist intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736499DOI Listing
February 2018
5 Reads

Silver Diamine Fluoride: A Successful Anticarious Solution with Limits.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):131-134

1 Division of Biomaterials, Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is a solution containing ionic silver, fluoride, and ammonia that arrests the progress of carious lesions and prevents the development of future caries. The silver particle extends into the dentin tubules and could create some bonding problems for subsequent composite resin restorations placed over SDF-treated darkened tooth structures. The fluoride penetrates deeper into the tooth with SDF as compared with other fluoride solutions, creating a fluoride reservoir in the tooth structure. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517740123
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517740123DOI Listing
February 2018
10 Reads

The Evidence for Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA®).

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):9-14

1 Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

A system for Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) has been developed in California. The purpose of this article is to summarize the science behind the methodology, the history of the development of CAMBRA, and the outcomes of clinical application. The CAMBRA caries risk assessment (CRA) tool for ages 6 y through adult has been used at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), for 14 y, and outcome studies involving thousands of patients have been conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736500DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784484PMC
February 2018
2 Reads

Oral Microbiome Studies: Potential Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications.

Authors:
A Mira

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):71-77

1 Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, FISABIO Foundation, Valencia, Spain.

Understanding the microbiology of dental caries is not a mere academic exercise; it provides the basis for preventive, diagnostic, and treatment strategies and gives the dentist a theoretical framework to become a better professional. The last years have seen the development of new research methodologies, ranging from high-throughput sequencing or "omics" techniques to new fluorescence microscopy applications and microfluidics, which have allowed the study of the oral microbiome to an unprecedented level of detail. Those studies have provided new insights about oral biofilm formation, biomarkers of caries risk, microbial etiology, appropriate sampling, identification of health-associated bacteria, and new anticaries strategies, among others. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737024DOI Listing
February 2018
6 Reads

Therapeutic Strategies Targeting Cariogenic Biofilm Microenvironment.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):86-92

1 Biofilm Research Labs, Levy Center for Oral Health, Department of Orthodontics, Divisions of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Cariogenic biofilms are highly structured microbial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix, a multifunctional scaffold that is essential for the existence of the biofilm lifestyle and full expression of virulence. The extracellular matrix provides the physical and biological properties that enhance biofilm adhesion and cohesion, as well as create a diffusion-modulating milieu, protecting the resident microbes and facilitating the formation of localized acidic pH niches. These biochemical properties pose significant challenges for the development of effective antibiofilm therapeutics to control dental caries. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517736497
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736497DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784482PMC
February 2018
4 Reads

The Anticaries Efficacy of a 1.5% Arginine and Fluoride Toothpaste.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):93-97

1 Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care, NYU College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA.

Dental caries remains a world-wide disease despite the global distribution of fluoride. It has become apparent that the introduction of significant levels of sugar (fermentable carbohydrate) into the diet has resulted in a change in the biofilm, encouraging acid formation. Further, there has been a shift in the microbiota in the biofilm to a flora that produces acid, and thrives and reproduces in an acidic environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735298DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Dentist-Perceived Barriers and Attractors to Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Provided by Mental Health Providers in Dental Practices.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):35-41

1 Family Translational Research Group, Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA.

Over 1 in 5 dental patients report moderate to severe dental fear. Although the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for dental fear has been examined in over 20 randomized controlled trials-with 2 meta-analyses finding strong average effect sizes ( d > 1)-CBT has received almost no dissemination beyond the specialty clinics that tested it. The challenge, then, is not how to treat dental fear but how to disseminate and implement such an evidence-based treatment in a way that recognizes the rewards and barriers in the US health care system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737023DOI Listing
February 2018
2 Reads

Rebalancing the Caries Microbiome Dysbiosis: Targeted Treatment and Sugar Alcohols.

Authors:
L Zhan

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):110-116

1 Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Orofacial Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Dental caries is a disease that results from microbiome dysbiosis with the involvement of multiple cariogenic species, including mutans streptococci (MS), lactobacilli, Scardovia wiggsiae, and several Actinomyces species that have the cariogenic traits of acid production and acid tolerance. Sugar consumption also plays an important role interacting with microbiome dysbiosis, determining the fate of caries development. In addition, the MS transmission that encompasses multiple sources can have long-term impacts on the oral microbiome and caries development in children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784483PMC
February 2018
39 Reads

Reminova and EAER: Keeping Enamel Whole through Caries Remineralization.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):48-54

2 Reminova Ltd., Inveralmond Business Centre, Perth, UK.

This article aims to outline the early development of a King's College London dental spinout company, Reminova, formed to commercialize a novel clinical method of caries remineralization: electrically accelerated and enhanced remineralization (EAER). This method is being developed to address the unmet clinical need identified by modern caries management strategies to keep enamel "whole" through remineralization of clinical caries as a form of nonoperative caries treatment for initial-stage and moderate lesions. A progressive movement within dentistry is shifting away from the restorative-only model, which, it is suggested, has failed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737026DOI Listing
February 2018
8 Reads

Antimicrobial Activity of a Colloidal AgNP Suspension Demonstrated In Vitro against Monoculture Biofilms: Toward a Novel Tooth Disinfectant for Treating Dental Caries.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):117-123

1 Sir John Walsh Research Institute, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand.

A novel silver nanoparticle (AgNP) formulation was developed as a targeted application for the disinfection of carious dentine. Silver nitrate (AgNO) was chemically reduced using sodium borohydrate (NaBH) in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to form micelle aggregate structures containing monodisperse 6.7- to 9. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517736495
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736495DOI Listing
February 2018
7 Reads

Cariology Clinical Trials: What Are We-and What Should We Be-Looking At?

Authors:
N P T Innes

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):4-8

1 Paediatric Dentistry, Dundee Dental Hospital and School, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

Randomized control trial (RCT) methodology has compared interventions for the prevention and management of dental caries since the late 1960s. Despite almost 50 years and evidence of significant wastage within the wider biomedical research field, there has been little investigation into what works well and where weaknesses lie. This paper aims to draw attention to areas for improvement within cariology clinical trial methodology by summarizing systematic reviews on interventions and outcomes, and using examples to illustrate some challenges with intervention delivery fidelity, outcome analyses, and intervention co-production. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735296DOI Listing
February 2018
2 Reads

The Caries Microbiome: Implications for Reversing Dysbiosis.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):78-85

5 DentaQuest Institute, Columbia, MD, USA.

The oral microbiome plays a critical role in maintaining oral health. Frequent dietary carbohydrate intake can lead to dysbiosis of the microbial community from overproduction of acid with selection for increases in acidogenic, acid-tolerant bacteria. Knowledge of the caries-associated microbiome is key in planning approaches to reverse the dysbiosis to achieve health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736496DOI Listing
February 2018
5 Reads

Treatment of Carious Lesions Using Self-Assembling Peptides.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):42-47

1 Department of Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, Centre for Oral Health, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.

Modern approaches in caries treatment involve lesion management without tissue removal. Regenerative medicine focuses on replacing damaged tissues with biologically similar tissues. This article discusses the scientific evidence and clinical results for self-assembling peptides in modern caries management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737025DOI Listing
February 2018
16 Reads

Fluoride Use in Health Care Settings: Association with Children's Caries Risk.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):24-34

4 University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.

Expanded partnership with the medical community is an important strategy for reducing dental caries disparities. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between fluoride (F) "in office" (drops/tablets and/or varnish), as prescribed or applied by a health care professional by age 1 y, and 1) caries development and 2) presence of other caries risk factors or mediators (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735297DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784481PMC
February 2018
17 Reads

Potential Uses of Arginine in Dentistry.

Authors:
M M Nascimento

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):98-103

1 Department of Restorative Dental Sciences, Division of Operative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Carious lesions develop in tooth surfaces where there is an imbalance of the processes of acid and alkali production by supragingival biofilms. Since low pH is the main driving factor in the development of carious lesions, most efforts to identify an effective anticaries therapy have focused on targeting the acid-producing bacteria and their mechanisms of acid production. An expanding area of oral microbiology has now been devoted to explore microbial metabolic activities that help to neutralize biofilm pH and thus inhibit the caries process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735294DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784480PMC
February 2018
3 Reads

In Sickness and in Health-What Does the Oral Microbiome Mean to Us? An Ecological Perspective.

Authors:
P D Marsh

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):60-65

1 Department of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

The oral microbiome is natural and has a symbiotic relationship with the host by delivering important benefits. In oral health, a dynamic balance is reached between the host, the environment, and the microbiome. However, the frequent intake of sugar and/or reductions in saliva flow results in extended periods of low pH in the biofilm, which disrupts this symbiotic relationship. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735295DOI Listing
February 2018
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Changes in Caries Risk in a Practice-Based Randomized Controlled Trial.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):15-23

1 Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

To demonstrate that Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) can be successfully implemented in dental practice, 30 dentists were recruited to perform a 2-y CAMBRA trial. Twenty-one dentists (18 private practices, 3 community clinics) participated in a randomized, controlled, parallel-arm, double-blind clinical trial with individual-level assignment of 460 participants to standard of care (control) versus active CAMBRA treatment (intervention). Control or active antimicrobial and remineralizing agents were dispensed at baseline and 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-mo recall visits according to risk level and assigned treatment arm. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517737022
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6699126PMC
February 2018
4 Reads

Getting to Know "The Known Unknowns": Heterogeneity in the Oral Microbiome.

Authors:
R A Burne

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):66-70

1 Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Technological advances in DNA sequencing have provided unprecedented insights into the composition of the oral microbiome in health and disease, and RNA-sequencing and metabolomics-related technologies are beginning to yield information on the activities of these organisms. Importantly, progress in this area has brought the scientific community closer to an understanding of what constitutes a health-associated microbiome and is supporting the notion that the microbiota in healthy sites assumes an active role in promoting health and suppressing the acquisition, persistence, and activities of overt and opportunistic pathogens. It is also becoming clear that a significant impediment to developing a conclusive body of evidence that defines a healthy microbiome and the mechanisms by which beneficial bacteria promote health is that an inherent characteristic of the most abundant members of the oral flora, those that potentially play the greatest roles in health and disease, is intraspecies genomic diversity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784479PMC
February 2018
2 Reads

Introduction to ICNARA 3.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1)

3 Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517746372DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Carious Tissue Removal.

Adv Dent Res 2016 May;28(2):58-67

Paediatric Dentistry, Dundee Dental Hospital and School, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

The International Caries Consensus Collaboration undertook a consensus process and here presents clinical recommendations for carious tissue removal and managing cavitated carious lesions, including restoration, based on texture of demineralized dentine. Dentists should manage the disease dental caries and control activity of existing cavitated lesions to preserve hard tissues and retain teeth long-term. Entering the restorative cycle should be avoided as far as possible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034516639271DOI Listing
May 2016
5 Reads

Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Terminology.

Adv Dent Res 2016 May;28(2):49-57

Department of Operative and Preventive Dentistry, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Variation in the terminology used to describe clinical management of carious lesions has contributed to a lack of clarity in the scientific literature and beyond. In this article, the International Caries Consensus Collaboration presents 1) issues around terminology, a scoping review of current words used in the literature for caries removal techniques, and 2) agreed terms and definitions, explaining how these were decided.Dental cariesis the name of the disease, and thecarious lesionis the consequence and manifestation of the disease-the signs or symptoms of the disease. Read More

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http://adr.sagepub.com/content/28/2/49.full.pdf
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http://adr.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0022034516639276
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034516639276DOI Listing
May 2016
4 Reads

Managing Carious Lesions: Why Do We Need Consensus on Terminology and Clinical Recommendations on Carious Tissue Removal?

Adv Dent Res 2016 May;28(2):46-8

Department of Operative and Preventive Dentistry, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034516639272DOI Listing
May 2016
3 Reads