785 results match your criteria Adv. Dent. Res.[Journal]


Guidelines for Fluoride Intake: First Discussant.

Adv Dent Res 2018 Mar;29(2):177-178

1 Department of Cariology, Operative Dentistry and Dental Public Health, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750590DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read

Summary of General Discussion and Conclusions.

Authors:
F V Zohoori

Adv Dent Res 2018 Mar;29(2):183-185

1 School of Health & Social Care, Teesside University, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750591DOI Listing

Understanding Optimum Fluoride Intake from Population-Level Evidence.

Adv Dent Res 2018 Mar;29(2):144-156

1 Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health (ARCPOH), The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.

Policy on fluoride intake involves balancing caries against dental fluorosis in populations. The origin of this balance lies with Dean's research on fluoride concentration in water supplies, caries, and fluorosis. Dean identified cut points in the Index of Dental Fluorosis of 0. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517750592
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750592DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

Introduction: Guidelines for Fluoride Intake-Are They Appropriate?

Authors:
A J Rugg-Gunn

Adv Dent Res 2018 Mar;29(2):142-143

1 Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750588DOI Listing

Current Guidance for Fluoride Intake: Is It Appropriate?

Authors:
I Mejàre

Adv Dent Res 2018 Mar;29(2):167-176

1 Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.

The purpose of this report is to examine critically the appropriateness of the current guidance for fluoride intake in the population (0.05-0.07 mg F/kg bodyweight/d), consider whether changes to the current guidance are desirable, and suggest further research that will strengthen the evidence base for future decisions on guidance/advice in this area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750589DOI Listing
March 2018
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Guidelines for Fluoride Intake: Second Discussant.

Authors:
A W G Walls

Adv Dent Res 2018 Mar;29(2):179-182

1 Edinburgh Dental Institute, Edinburgh, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750594DOI Listing
March 2018
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Review of Fluoride Intake and Appropriateness of Current Guidelines.

Authors:
M A R Buzalaf

Adv Dent Res 2018 Mar;29(2):157-166

1 Department of Biological Sciences, Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil.

Since the classical epidemiological studies by Dean, it has been known that there should be an optimum level of exposure to fluoride that would be able to provide the maximum protection against caries, with minimum dental fluorosis. The "optimal" daily intake of fluoride for children (0.05-0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517750850DOI Listing
March 2018
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Silver Fluoride as a Treatment for Dental Caries.

Authors:
J A Horst

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):135-140

1 Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Medical management of caries is a distinct treatment philosophy that employs topical minimally invasive therapies that treat the disease and is not merely prevention. This strategy is justified as an alternative or supplement to traditional care by significant disease recurrence rates following comprehensive operative treatment under general anesthesia. Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is one agent to enable effective noninvasive treatment. Read More

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February 2018
3 Reads

Stannous Fluoride Effects on Gene Expression of Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):124-130

3 The Procter and Gamble Company, Mason Business Center, Mason, OH, USA.

A genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed to elucidate the bacterial cellular response of Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus to NaF and SnF. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of SnF were predetermined before microarray study. Gene expression profiling microarray experiments were carried out in the absence (control) and presence (experimental) of 10 ppm and 100 ppm Sn (in the form of SnF) and fluoride controls for 10-min exposures (4 biological replicates/treatment). Read More

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February 2018
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Recent Advances in Remineralization Therapies for Caries Lesions.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):55-59

1 Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Remineralization of caries lesions is naturally achieved by salivary ions, and it can be enhanced by external factors or elements such as fluoride. Numerous studies have demonstrated the remineralizing efficacy of fluoride therapies as well as the limitations with some groups of the population. Consequently, developing new remineralization therapies to close this gap in efficacy has been a priority for the last 2 decades. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517740124
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517740124DOI Listing
February 2018
9 Reads

Erythritol Functional Roles in Oral-Systemic Health.

Authors:
P de Cock

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):104-109

1 DGH Nutrition Innovation, Keerbergen, Belgium.

Erythritol belongs chemically to the family of polyols (or sugar alcohols), yet it is metabolized by animals and humans very differently compared to all other polyols. While polyols have been used traditionally (for about 80 y) to replace sugar in sweet foods to reduce demineralization of tooth enamel and to reduce postprandial blood glucose levels, benefits achieved merely through the absence of sugar, emerging evidence shows that erythritol can play a number of functional roles to actively support maintenance of oral and systemic health. Oral health studies revealed that erythritol can reduce dental plaque weight, reduce dental plaque acids, reduce counts of mutans streptococci in saliva and dental plaque, and reduce the risk for dental caries better than sorbitol and xylitol, resulting in fewer tooth restorations by dentist intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736499DOI Listing
February 2018
2 Reads

Silver Diamine Fluoride: A Successful Anticarious Solution with Limits.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):131-134

1 Division of Biomaterials, Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is a solution containing ionic silver, fluoride, and ammonia that arrests the progress of carious lesions and prevents the development of future caries. The silver particle extends into the dentin tubules and could create some bonding problems for subsequent composite resin restorations placed over SDF-treated darkened tooth structures. The fluoride penetrates deeper into the tooth with SDF as compared with other fluoride solutions, creating a fluoride reservoir in the tooth structure. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517740123
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February 2018
7 Reads

The Evidence for Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA®).

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):9-14

1 Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

A system for Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) has been developed in California. The purpose of this article is to summarize the science behind the methodology, the history of the development of CAMBRA, and the outcomes of clinical application. The CAMBRA caries risk assessment (CRA) tool for ages 6 y through adult has been used at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), for 14 y, and outcome studies involving thousands of patients have been conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736500DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784484PMC
February 2018

Oral Microbiome Studies: Potential Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications.

Authors:
A Mira

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):71-77

1 Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, FISABIO Foundation, Valencia, Spain.

Understanding the microbiology of dental caries is not a mere academic exercise; it provides the basis for preventive, diagnostic, and treatment strategies and gives the dentist a theoretical framework to become a better professional. The last years have seen the development of new research methodologies, ranging from high-throughput sequencing or "omics" techniques to new fluorescence microscopy applications and microfluidics, which have allowed the study of the oral microbiome to an unprecedented level of detail. Those studies have provided new insights about oral biofilm formation, biomarkers of caries risk, microbial etiology, appropriate sampling, identification of health-associated bacteria, and new anticaries strategies, among others. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737024DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Therapeutic Strategies Targeting Cariogenic Biofilm Microenvironment.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):86-92

1 Biofilm Research Labs, Levy Center for Oral Health, Department of Orthodontics, Divisions of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Cariogenic biofilms are highly structured microbial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix, a multifunctional scaffold that is essential for the existence of the biofilm lifestyle and full expression of virulence. The extracellular matrix provides the physical and biological properties that enhance biofilm adhesion and cohesion, as well as create a diffusion-modulating milieu, protecting the resident microbes and facilitating the formation of localized acidic pH niches. These biochemical properties pose significant challenges for the development of effective antibiofilm therapeutics to control dental caries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736497DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784482PMC
February 2018
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The Anticaries Efficacy of a 1.5% Arginine and Fluoride Toothpaste.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):93-97

1 Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care, NYU College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA.

Dental caries remains a world-wide disease despite the global distribution of fluoride. It has become apparent that the introduction of significant levels of sugar (fermentable carbohydrate) into the diet has resulted in a change in the biofilm, encouraging acid formation. Further, there has been a shift in the microbiota in the biofilm to a flora that produces acid, and thrives and reproduces in an acidic environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735298DOI Listing
February 2018

Dentist-Perceived Barriers and Attractors to Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Provided by Mental Health Providers in Dental Practices.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):35-41

1 Family Translational Research Group, Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA.

Over 1 in 5 dental patients report moderate to severe dental fear. Although the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for dental fear has been examined in over 20 randomized controlled trials-with 2 meta-analyses finding strong average effect sizes ( d > 1)-CBT has received almost no dissemination beyond the specialty clinics that tested it. The challenge, then, is not how to treat dental fear but how to disseminate and implement such an evidence-based treatment in a way that recognizes the rewards and barriers in the US health care system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737023DOI Listing
February 2018

Rebalancing the Caries Microbiome Dysbiosis: Targeted Treatment and Sugar Alcohols.

Authors:
L Zhan

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):110-116

1 Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Orofacial Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Dental caries is a disease that results from microbiome dysbiosis with the involvement of multiple cariogenic species, including mutans streptococci (MS), lactobacilli, Scardovia wiggsiae, and several Actinomyces species that have the cariogenic traits of acid production and acid tolerance. Sugar consumption also plays an important role interacting with microbiome dysbiosis, determining the fate of caries development. In addition, the MS transmission that encompasses multiple sources can have long-term impacts on the oral microbiome and caries development in children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784483PMC
February 2018
10 Reads

Reminova and EAER: Keeping Enamel Whole through Caries Remineralization.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):48-54

2 Reminova Ltd., Inveralmond Business Centre, Perth, UK.

This article aims to outline the early development of a King's College London dental spinout company, Reminova, formed to commercialize a novel clinical method of caries remineralization: electrically accelerated and enhanced remineralization (EAER). This method is being developed to address the unmet clinical need identified by modern caries management strategies to keep enamel "whole" through remineralization of clinical caries as a form of nonoperative caries treatment for initial-stage and moderate lesions. A progressive movement within dentistry is shifting away from the restorative-only model, which, it is suggested, has failed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737026DOI Listing
February 2018
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Antimicrobial Activity of a Colloidal AgNP Suspension Demonstrated In Vitro against Monoculture Biofilms: Toward a Novel Tooth Disinfectant for Treating Dental Caries.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):117-123

1 Sir John Walsh Research Institute, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand.

A novel silver nanoparticle (AgNP) formulation was developed as a targeted application for the disinfection of carious dentine. Silver nitrate (AgNO) was chemically reduced using sodium borohydrate (NaBH) in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to form micelle aggregate structures containing monodisperse 6.7- to 9. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034517736495
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February 2018
5 Reads

Cariology Clinical Trials: What Are We-and What Should We Be-Looking At?

Authors:
N P T Innes

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):4-8

1 Paediatric Dentistry, Dundee Dental Hospital and School, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

Randomized control trial (RCT) methodology has compared interventions for the prevention and management of dental caries since the late 1960s. Despite almost 50 years and evidence of significant wastage within the wider biomedical research field, there has been little investigation into what works well and where weaknesses lie. This paper aims to draw attention to areas for improvement within cariology clinical trial methodology by summarizing systematic reviews on interventions and outcomes, and using examples to illustrate some challenges with intervention delivery fidelity, outcome analyses, and intervention co-production. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735296DOI Listing
February 2018

The Caries Microbiome: Implications for Reversing Dysbiosis.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):78-85

5 DentaQuest Institute, Columbia, MD, USA.

The oral microbiome plays a critical role in maintaining oral health. Frequent dietary carbohydrate intake can lead to dysbiosis of the microbial community from overproduction of acid with selection for increases in acidogenic, acid-tolerant bacteria. Knowledge of the caries-associated microbiome is key in planning approaches to reverse the dysbiosis to achieve health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517736496DOI Listing
February 2018
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Treatment of Carious Lesions Using Self-Assembling Peptides.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):42-47

1 Department of Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, Centre for Oral Health, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.

Modern approaches in caries treatment involve lesion management without tissue removal. Regenerative medicine focuses on replacing damaged tissues with biologically similar tissues. This article discusses the scientific evidence and clinical results for self-assembling peptides in modern caries management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737025DOI Listing
February 2018
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Fluoride Use in Health Care Settings: Association with Children's Caries Risk.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):24-34

4 University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.

Expanded partnership with the medical community is an important strategy for reducing dental caries disparities. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between fluoride (F) "in office" (drops/tablets and/or varnish), as prescribed or applied by a health care professional by age 1 y, and 1) caries development and 2) presence of other caries risk factors or mediators (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735297DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784481PMC
February 2018
1 Read

Potential Uses of Arginine in Dentistry.

Authors:
M M Nascimento

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):98-103

1 Department of Restorative Dental Sciences, Division of Operative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Carious lesions develop in tooth surfaces where there is an imbalance of the processes of acid and alkali production by supragingival biofilms. Since low pH is the main driving factor in the development of carious lesions, most efforts to identify an effective anticaries therapy have focused on targeting the acid-producing bacteria and their mechanisms of acid production. An expanding area of oral microbiology has now been devoted to explore microbial metabolic activities that help to neutralize biofilm pH and thus inhibit the caries process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735294DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784480PMC
February 2018
1 Read

In Sickness and in Health-What Does the Oral Microbiome Mean to Us? An Ecological Perspective.

Authors:
P D Marsh

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):60-65

1 Department of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

The oral microbiome is natural and has a symbiotic relationship with the host by delivering important benefits. In oral health, a dynamic balance is reached between the host, the environment, and the microbiome. However, the frequent intake of sugar and/or reductions in saliva flow results in extended periods of low pH in the biofilm, which disrupts this symbiotic relationship. Read More

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February 2018

Changes in Caries Risk in a Practice-Based Randomized Controlled Trial.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):15-23

1 Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

To demonstrate that Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) can be successfully implemented in dental practice, 30 dentists were recruited to perform a 2-y CAMBRA trial. Twenty-one dentists (18 private practices, 3 community clinics) participated in a randomized, controlled, parallel-arm, double-blind clinical trial with individual-level assignment of 460 participants to standard of care (control) versus active CAMBRA treatment (intervention). Control or active antimicrobial and remineralizing agents were dispensed at baseline and 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-mo recall visits according to risk level and assigned treatment arm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517737022DOI Listing
February 2018
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Getting to Know "The Known Unknowns": Heterogeneity in the Oral Microbiome.

Authors:
R A Burne

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1):66-70

1 Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Technological advances in DNA sequencing have provided unprecedented insights into the composition of the oral microbiome in health and disease, and RNA-sequencing and metabolomics-related technologies are beginning to yield information on the activities of these organisms. Importantly, progress in this area has brought the scientific community closer to an understanding of what constitutes a health-associated microbiome and is supporting the notion that the microbiota in healthy sites assumes an active role in promoting health and suppressing the acquisition, persistence, and activities of overt and opportunistic pathogens. It is also becoming clear that a significant impediment to developing a conclusive body of evidence that defines a healthy microbiome and the mechanisms by which beneficial bacteria promote health is that an inherent characteristic of the most abundant members of the oral flora, those that potentially play the greatest roles in health and disease, is intraspecies genomic diversity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517735293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5784479PMC
February 2018

Introduction to ICNARA 3.

Adv Dent Res 2018 02;29(1)

3 Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034517746372DOI Listing
February 2018

Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Carious Tissue Removal.

Adv Dent Res 2016 May;28(2):58-67

Paediatric Dentistry, Dundee Dental Hospital and School, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

The International Caries Consensus Collaboration undertook a consensus process and here presents clinical recommendations for carious tissue removal and managing cavitated carious lesions, including restoration, based on texture of demineralized dentine. Dentists should manage the disease dental caries and control activity of existing cavitated lesions to preserve hard tissues and retain teeth long-term. Entering the restorative cycle should be avoided as far as possible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034516639271DOI Listing
May 2016
1 Read

Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Terminology.

Adv Dent Res 2016 May;28(2):49-57

Department of Operative and Preventive Dentistry, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Variation in the terminology used to describe clinical management of carious lesions has contributed to a lack of clarity in the scientific literature and beyond. In this article, the International Caries Consensus Collaboration presents 1) issues around terminology, a scoping review of current words used in the literature for caries removal techniques, and 2) agreed terms and definitions, explaining how these were decided.Dental cariesis the name of the disease, and thecarious lesionis the consequence and manifestation of the disease-the signs or symptoms of the disease. Read More

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May 2016
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Managing Carious Lesions: Why Do We Need Consensus on Terminology and Clinical Recommendations on Carious Tissue Removal?

Adv Dent Res 2016 May;28(2):46-8

Department of Operative and Preventive Dentistry, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034516639272DOI Listing
May 2016
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Effect of Osteotomy Preparation on Osseointegration of Immediately Loaded, Tapered Dental Implants.

Adv Dent Res 2016 Mar;28(1):34-41

Institut Straumann, Basel, Switzerland Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, College of Dentistry, New York University, New York City, New York, USA

The aim of the present preclinical in vivo study was to evaluate whether a modified "drill-only" protocol, involving slight underpreparation of the implant site, may have an effect on aspects of osseointegration of a novel bone-level tapered implant, compared with the "standard drilling" protocol involving taping and profiling of the marginal aspect of the implant socket. In each side of the edentulated and completely healed mandible of 11 minipigs, 2 tapered implants (8 mm long × 4.1 mm Ø, BLT; Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) were installed either with the drill-only or the standard drilling protocol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515624446DOI Listing
March 2016
1 Read

Integrative Performance Analysis of a Novel Bone Level Tapered Implant.

Adv Dent Res 2016 Mar;28(1):28-33

Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland.

Primary mechanical stability, as measured by maximum insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis, is generally considered to be positively associated with successful secondary stability and implant success. Primary implant stability can be affected by several factors, including the quality and quantity of available bone, the implant design, and the surgical procedure. The use of a tapered implant design, for instance, has been shown to result in good primary stability even in clinical scenarios where primary stability is otherwise difficult to achieve with traditional cylindrical implants-for example, in soft bone and for immediate placement in extraction sockets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515624443DOI Listing

A Critical Perspective on Mechanical Testing of Implants and Prostheses.

Adv Dent Res 2016 Mar;28(1):18-27

Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY, USA Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA Department of Engineering, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

The degree of interplay among variables in dental implant treatment presents a challenge to randomized clinical trials attempting to answer questions in a timely, unbiased, and economically feasible fashion. Further adding complexity to the different scenarios is the varied implant designs and related bone response, area of implantation, implant bulk material, restoration, abutments and related screws, fixation mode (screwed, fixed, or a combination), and horizontal implant-abutment matching geometry. This article critically appraises the most common mechanical testing methods used to characterize the implant-prostheses complex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515624445DOI Listing
March 2016
1 Read

Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation.

Adv Dent Res 2016 Mar;28(1):10-7

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.

Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515624444DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4772337PMC
March 2016
1 Read

Tapered Implants in Dentistry: Revitalizing Concepts with Technology: A Review.

Adv Dent Res 2016 Mar;28(1):4-9

New York University College of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, New York City, NY, USA Institut Straumann, Basel, Switzerland.

The most common approach to lessen treatment times is by decreasing the healing period during which osseointegration is established. Implant design parameters such as implant surface, primary stability, thread configuration, body shape, and the type of bone have to be considered to obtain this objective. The relationship that exists between these components will define the initial stability of the implant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034516628868DOI Listing
March 2016
2 Reads

Clinical Relevance of Integrated Developmental Research for Dental Implants.

Authors:
M Dard

Adv Dent Res 2016 Mar;28(1):2-3

New York University, College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA Institut Straumann, Medical Affairs, Basel, Switzerland

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034516630947DOI Listing

Strategies for Oral Health Research in Africa and the Middle Eastern Region.

Adv Dent Res 2015 Jul;27(1):43-9

College of Medicine, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria.

The highest burden of diseases worldwide is in low- and middle-income countries, but due to lack of capacity and inadequate infrastructure, research output from these countries is unable to address existing and emerging challenges in health care. Oral health research has particularly been hampered by low prioritization, resulting in insufficient development of this sector. There is an urgent need for research correlating oral health to upstream social and environmental determinants and promoting the common risk factor approach for prevention of noncommunicable diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515575539DOI Listing
July 2015
1 Read

Capacity Building and Financing Oral Health in the African and Middle East Region.

Adv Dent Res 2015 Jul;27(1):32-42

Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait.

Many low- and middle-income countries do not yet have policies to implement effective oral health programs. A reason is lack of human and financial resources. Gaps between resource needs and available health funding are widening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515578909DOI Listing

Determinants of Oral Diseases in the African and Middle East Region.

Adv Dent Res 2015 Jul;27(1):26-31

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

Oral health policies must be developed that emphasize the role of social determinants in health and oral diseases. The aim of this report is to review literature on determinants of oral diseases and apply the concepts to promoting oral health in the African countries in the African and Middle East region (AMER). Structural and proximal determinants of oral diseases are common to those affected by other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515581645DOI Listing
July 2015
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Oral Health Inequalities between Rural and Urban Populations of the African and Middle East Region.

Adv Dent Res 2015 Jul;27(1):18-25

Faculty of Dentistry, University of Nigeria-Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria.

Although there have been major improvements in oral health, with remarkable advances in the prevention and management of oral diseases, globally, inequalities persist between urban and rural communities. These inequalities exist in the distribution of oral health services, accessibility, utilization, treatment outcomes, oral health knowledge and practices, health insurance coverage, oral health-related quality of life, and prevalence of oral diseases, among others. People living in rural areas are likely to be poorer, be less health literate, have more caries, have fewer teeth, have no health insurance coverage, and have less money to spend on dental care than persons living in urban areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515575538DOI Listing

Prevalence and Severity of Oral Diseases in the Africa and Middle East Region.

Adv Dent Res 2015 Jul;27(1):10-7

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria.

This review aims to determine the prevalence and severity of oral health diseases in the Africa and Middle East region (AMER). The profile of oral diseases is not homogeneous across the AMER. There are large disparities between groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515582062DOI Listing

Reducing Inequalities in Oral Health in the Africa and Middle East Region.

Adv Dent Res 2015 Jul;27(1):4-9

School of Dentistry, Bart's and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK.

Dentistry is facing many serious challenges and threats. Addressing them will require major changes in strategy. This work outlines the extent of dental disease in the Africa and Middle East Region (AMER) and suggests strategies to reduce inequalities in oral health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515575540DOI Listing

Oral Health Inequalities in Africa and the Middle East.

Authors:
E Honkala

Adv Dent Res 2015 Jul;27(1):2-3

Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034515575541DOI Listing

Periodontal disease, atherosclerosis, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and head-and-neck cancer.

Adv Dent Res 2014 May;26(1):47-55

Department of Periodontics, School of Dental Medicine and Departments of Pathology and Reproductive Biology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

Interrelationships between periodontal infection and systemic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Periodontitis is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and, experimentally, with measures of atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction. Periodontal therapy may reduce atherosclerotic changes and improve endothelial function. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034514528334
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034514528334DOI Listing
May 2014
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Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

Adv Dent Res 2014 May;26(1):38-46

Department of Oral Medicine, Infection, and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, 188 Longwood Avenue, REB 513, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034514529305DOI Listing

Recent advances in host defense mechanisms/therapies against oral infectious diseases and consequences for systemic disease.

Adv Dent Res 2014 May;26(1):30-7

Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Division of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology, S702 BST, 3500 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.

The innate and adaptive immune systems are both crucial to oral disease mechanisms and their impact on systemic health status. Greater understanding of these interrelationships will yield opportunities to identify new therapeutic targets to modulate disease processes and/or increase host resistance to infectious or inflammatory insult. The topics addressed reflect the latest advances in our knowledge of the role of innate and adaptive immune systems and inflammatory mechanisms in infectious diseases affecting the oral cavity, including periodontitis and candidiasis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034514525778DOI Listing

Novel inflammatory pathways in periodontitis.

Adv Dent Res 2014 May;26(1):23-9

Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Dental School, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

New insights into the biological mechanisms involved in modulating periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss are paving the way for novel therapeutic strategies for periodontitis. The neutrophil adhesion cascade for transmigration in response to infection or inflammation is a key paradigm in immunity. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is one of several newly identified endogenous inhibitors of the leukocyte adhesion cascade. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034514526240DOI Listing

Genetic characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms of periodontal pathogens.

Adv Dent Res 2014 May;26(1):15-22

Department of Preventive Dentistry, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita-Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

Periodontal disease is caused by a group of bacteria that utilize a variety of strategies and molecular mechanisms to evade or overcome host defenses. Recent research has uncovered new evidence illuminating interesting aspects of the virulence of these bacteria and their genomic variability. This paper summarizes some of the strategies utilized by the major species - Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis - implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034514526237DOI Listing