82 results match your criteria Adv Nutr Res[Journal]


Breast milk and the risk of opportunistic infection in infancy in industrialized and non-industrialized settings.

Authors:
P F Chien P W Howie

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:69-104

Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, Scotland DD1 9SY.

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Immunological activities associated with milk.

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:39-65

Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, California, USA.

Milk contains a multitude of components that can, or may, provide immune protection to the suckling offspring and that also may promote development of neonatal immune competence. In addition, these specialized factors are essential for the protection of the mammary gland, the offspring's food source, from pathogen colonization and lactation failure. Breast milk also facilitates the establishment of a gut flora that inhibits colonization by many pathogens and stimulates the growth of beneficial microorganisms. Read More

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Milk banking: the influence of storage procedures and subsequent processing on immunologic components of human milk.

Authors:
R A Lawrence

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:389-404

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York 14642, USA.

The immunoprotective constituents of human milk are stable when stored at room temperature for 8 hours, when stored at 0 degree-4 degrees C for three days, or when frozen at -20 degrees C for 12 months. They are also stable during pasteurization at 56 degrees C for 30 minutes. Sonification may reduce levels of sIgA and lysozyme and the ability of milk to inhibit growth of E coli. Read More

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Maternal modulation of specific and non-specific immune components of colostrum and mature milk.

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:365-87

Department of Biochemistry, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia.

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Dietary whey proteins and immunocompetence in the post-weaning stages of life.

Authors:
C W Wong

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:351-62

University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.

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Milk components with immunomodulatory potential.

Authors:
S M Filteau

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:327-50

Centre for International Child Health, Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK.

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Maturation of immunocompetence in breast-fed vs. formula-fed infants.

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:311-25

Göteborg University, Department of Clinical Immunology, Guldhedsgatan 10, S-413 46 Göteborg, Sweden.

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Overview of the mammalian immune system.

Authors:
A J Husband

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:3-14

Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Pathology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

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The antimicrobial and immunomodulating actions of milk leukocytes.

Authors:
G Riedel-Caspari

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:287-307

Planta Vet, Postfach 1339, Finkenweg 13, D-88339 Bad Waldsee, Germany.

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The antimicrobial function of milk lipids.

Authors:
C E Isaacs

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:271-85

Department of Developmental Biochemistry, Institute for Basic Research, 1050 Forest Hill Road, Staten Island, NY 10314, USA.

Milk lipids serve not only as nutrients but as antimicrobial agents that constitute a defense system against microbial infections that occur at mucosal surfaces. The lipid fraction of milk develops antimicrobial activity in the gastrointestinal tract of suckling neonates as a result of lipolytic activity which converts milk triglycerides to antimicrobial fatty acids and monoglycerides. Antimicrobial milk lipids may be particularly important in protecting infants with an inadequate secretory immune response from infection. Read More

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Antimicrobial actions of lactoferrin.

Authors:
R Chierici

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:247-69

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Neonatology, Arcispedale S. Anna, Ferrara-Italy.

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Chemistry of milk mucins and their anti-microbial action.

Authors:
H Schroten

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:231-45

University Children's Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.

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The role of human milk secretory IgA in protecting infants from bacterial enteritis.

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:213-29

University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center, Department of Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases Division, 6431 Fannin, JFB 1.739, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

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Colostrum and milk in the treatment of disease.

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:201-12

Arizona Prevention Center, P.O. Box 245155, 1501 N. Campbell Ave, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA.

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Mammary gland defense: the role of colostrum, milk and involution secretion.

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:167-98

Department of Biochemistry, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia.

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The immunological system in human milk: the past--a pathway to the future.

Authors:
A S Goldman

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:15-37

Division of Immunology/Allergy/Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555-0369, USA.

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The protective properties of milk and colostrum in non-human species.

Authors:
I Tizard

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:139-66

Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA.

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Breast milk decreases the risk of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

Authors:
A M Kosloske

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:123-37

Departments of Surgery and Pediatrics, Texas Tech University School of Medicine, Lubbock, TX 79415, USA.

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Breast milk transmission of viral disease.

Adv Nutr Res 2001 ;10:105-22

UCLA Department of Pediatrics, UCLA Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Breast milk transmission of maternal viral infection is well established for CMV and HIV-1. In the case of CMV, this usually does not pose a risk to the infant since serious disease is prevented by placentally transferred maternal antibody. However, in HIV infection, breast-feeding increases the risk of maternal-fetal transmission by about 25% with late breast-feeding (after six months of age) constituting a particular risk. Read More

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Osteoporosis in Japan: factors contributing to the low incidence of hip fracture.

Authors:
T Fujita

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:89-99

Calcium Research Institute, Osaka, Japan.

Hip fracture incidence seems to be lower in Japan than in many Western countries, but the difference is apparently becoming smaller with progressive Westernization of the Japanese lifestyle and nutritional habits. Nutrition cannot explain the lower incidence of hip fracture. A lower calcium intake prevails in Japan. Read More

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The significance of habitual calcium intake in the pathogenesis of peri- and early postmenopausal bone loss.

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:73-88

Department of Nutrition, Netherlands Institute for Dairy Research (NIZO), Ede.

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Bone loss in animals.

Authors:
H H Draper

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:53-71

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

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Low bone mass in past and present aboriginal populations.

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:35-51

School of Human Biology, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

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The menstrual cycle: effects on bone in menopausal women.

Authors:
S I Barr J C Prior

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:287-310

School of Family and Nutritional Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

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Exercise and bone loss.

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:273-85

Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706, USA.

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The effect of obesity on postmenopausal bone loss and the risk of osteoporosis.

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:257-71

Endocrinology Department, C.H.U. Purpan, Toulouse, France.

There are many data indicating that osteoporotic fractures, and particularly hip fractures, are less frequent in obese subjects. Overweight and obese women have a higher bone mass after menopause than women of the same age who are not overweight, and thus in all probability have a slower bone loss. This protective effect appears to be related both to mechanical factors and to estrogen synthesis in adipose tissue. Read More

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Bone mineral content in postmenopausal vegetarians and omnivores.

Authors:
I F Hunt

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:245-55

School of Public Health, UCLA 90024, USA.

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Fluoride in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

Authors:
J A Inkovaara

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:231-43

University Central Hospital, Tampere, Finland.

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The effect of sodium on calcium requirement.

Authors:
B E Nordin A G Need

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:209-30

Division of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, South Australia.

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The effects of high phosphorus intake on calcium homeostasis.

Authors:
M S Calvo

Adv Nutr Res 1994 ;9:183-207

Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Washington DC 20204, USA.

Survey data confirm that the dietary pattern of many American women who are at high risk of developing osteoporosis is typically high in phosphorus and low in calcium. The imbalance between calcium and phosphorus intake may become more pronounced with continued changes in food preferences and the growing use of phosphorus-containing food additives. Recent studies in young women have shown that a high phosphorus diet moderately low in calcium results in a mild secondary hyperparathyroidism that persists over 4 weeks. Read More

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