5 results match your criteria Adult Physiatric History and Examination

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Misinterpretation of regional sensory loss in an injured worker: a case report.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2002 Aug;83(8):1171-2

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, Newark 07103, USA.

Regional patterns of motor or sensory loss are considered indicators of a behavioral component to the complaints of an injured worker. This assumption may lead to a discounting of signs and symptoms with premature return to work and discharge from care. We present the case of a 25-year-old airline baggage handler with an 8-month history of unresolved neck and shoulder complaints who had been returned to work after a lack of objective findings on physical examination. Read More

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August 2002
10 Reads

Femoral neck stress fracture presenting as gluteal pain in a marathon runner: case report.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1999 Feb;80(2):236-8

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City 84132, USA.

A case is described of a 50-year-old man with a femoral neck stress fracture presenting as gluteal pain. An operative pinning procedure of the femoral neck was performed for stabilization. Femoral neck stress fractures are often misdiagnosed early in their presentation. Read More

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February 1999
8 Reads

Diagnosis of a C-2 fracture during physiatric consultation: a case report.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1998 May-Jun;77(3):262-6

JFK Rehabilitation Institute, the JFK Medical Center, Edison, New Jersey, USA.

Consultation in the acute care setting allows physiatrists to make significant contributions. In our case, a 90-year-old woman presented to the emergency room after falling down five stairs. Six view C-spine films taken at that time revealed no fracture. Read More

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July 1998
8 Reads

An illustration of clinical gait laboratory use to improve rehabilitation management.

Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1994 Nov-Dec;73(6):421-7

Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Boston, MA 02114.

The purpose of this report is to illustrate the utility of a gait laboratory as a simple, straightforward aid to psychiatric care. The evaluation and management of a patient with spastic paresis and reduced knee flexion in swing (stiff-legged gait), using quantitative gait analysis, are provided. Spastic quadriceps activity during swing was thought to be the cause of reduced knee flexion, based on traditional physiatric history and physical examination. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/ajpmr/1994/11000/AN_ILLUSTRATIO
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January 1995
8 Reads
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