3,492 results match your criteria Acta oto-laryngologica. Supplementum[Journal]


Towards a consensus on a hearing preservation classification system.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2013 (564):3-13

Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing , Warsaw , Poland.

Conclusion: The comprehensive Hearing Preservation classification system presented in this paper is suitable for use for all cochlear implant users with measurable pre-operative residual hearing. If adopted as a universal reporting standard, as it was designed to be, it should prove highly beneficial by enabling future studies to quickly and easily compare the results of previous studies and meta-analyze their data.

Objectives: To develop a comprehensive Hearing Preservation classification system suitable for use for all cochlear implant users with measurable pre-operative residual hearing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2013.869059DOI Listing
April 2016
4 Reads

Inner ear drug delivery system from the clinical point of view.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):101-4

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: Three types of inner ear drug delivery systems (DDS) that were ready to be applied in clinics were developed.

Objectives: To develop clinically applicable inner ear DDS for the treatment of inner ear disorders.

Methods: Inner ear DDS using clinically applicable materials were developed and evaluated. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00016489.2010.48
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.486801DOI Listing
November 2010
2 Reads

Hydrogen protects vestibular hair cells from free radicals.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):95-100

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: Hydrogen gas effectively protected against the morphological and functional vestibular hair cell damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS).

Objective: ROS are generally produced by oxidative stress. In the inner ear, ROS levels increase as a result of noise trauma and ototoxic drugs and induce damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.486799DOI Listing
November 2010
1 Read

Distribution of bone marrow-derived cells in the vestibular end organs and the endolymphatic sac.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):88-94

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) are constitutively present in the vestibular end organs and in the endolymphatic sac, and may play a role in the maintenance of inner ear homeostasis.

Objectives: The aim was to examine the distribution and characteristics of BMDCs in the vestibular end organs and in the endolymphatic sac.

Methods: Bone marrow-chimeric mice were generated by bone marrow transplantation from mice genetically labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein to C57 Bl/6 mice to visualize BMDCs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.486803DOI Listing
November 2010
1 Read

Impacts and limitations of medialization thyroplasty on swallowing function of patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):84-7

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusions: Medialization thyroplasty was effective in improving swallowing function as well as vocal function in most cases with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. The impact of medialization thryoplasty was insufficient for the case with severe atrophy and that in which the vocal fold was fixed in the lateral position.

Objectives: To evaluate the impacts and limitations of medialization thyroplasty on swallowing function of the patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00016489.2010.48
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.489575DOI Listing
November 2010
3 Reads

A tissue-engineering approach for stenosis of the trachea and/or cricoid.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):79-83

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, Japan.

Conclusion: This new regenerative therapy shows great potential for the treatment of stenosis of the trachea and/or cricoids (STC).

Objectives: To estimate the potential of tissue-engineered artificial trachea (AT) for treatment of STC in clinical applications. We previously reported that AT was a useful material for implantation into a tracheal defect after resection of cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.496462DOI Listing
November 2010
4 Reads

Ten years single institutional experience of treatment for oral cancer in Kyoto University.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):74-8

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusions: The prognosis of patients was related to the initial stage at diagnosis. These results suggest that early diagnosis and treatment are the most important factors to improve the prognosis in oral cancer patients. Adjuvant treatment is also warranted to improve locoregional control of advanced cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.490239DOI Listing
November 2010
3 Reads

Ten years single institutional experience of treatment for advanced laryngeal cancer in Kyoto University.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):68-73

Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: It is important to suppress lymph node recurrence and distant metastasis to achieve better survival of advanced laryngeal cancer, especially supraglottic cancer.

Objective: The therapeutic outcomes of 33 cases with advanced laryngeal cancer treated at Kyoto University Hospital between 2000 and 2008 were reviewed.

Methods: Thirty-one males and two females were involved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.492237DOI Listing
November 2010
3 Reads

Management and pitfalls of stage I/II glottic cancer.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):62-7

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusions: Once-daily radiotherapy for stage I glottic cancer and hyperfractionated radiotherapy for stage II glottic cancer achieved satisfactory results in terms of prognosis and laryngeal preservation. The treatment strategy for stage II glottal cancer with subglottal invasion needs to be reconsidered to further improve the outcome.

Objectives: Although early glottic carcinomas are highly curable by radiation therapy, the laryngeal preservation rate is not always sufficient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.489574DOI Listing
November 2010
5 Reads

Ten years single institutional experience of treatment for advanced hypopharyngeal cancer in Kyoto University.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):56-61

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: Treatment of advanced hypopharyngeal cancer has become more conservative and more multidisciplinary, and the prognosis has been improved. Induction chemotherapy has the potential to extend organ preservation therapy even in cases with locally advanced primary lesion. It is also important to develop a strategy to reduce distant metastasis and to keep track of second primary cancers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.487495DOI Listing
November 2010
5 Reads

Organ preservation surgery for advanced hypopharyngeal cancer.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):50-5

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: Organ preservation surgery with partial pharyngectomy preserving the larynx is feasible for the treatment of advanced hypopharyngeal cancer with comparable local control and preservation of function.

Objectives: To examine the feasibility and therapeutic effects of organ preservation surgery for advanced hypopharyngeal cancer.

Methods: Fourteen patients with stage III/IV hypopharyngeal cancer were treated by partial pharyngectomy with or without partial laryngectomy to preserve the larynx. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.487496DOI Listing
November 2010
6 Reads

Management of stage I/II hypopharyngeal cancer.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):43-9

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusions: It is suggested that radiotherapy might be the first choice for stage I/II hypopharyngeal cancer, and that adjuvant treatment might be necessary for stage II patients to prevent distant metastasis.

Objectives: To update the therapeutic outcome of early hypopharyngeal cancer.

Methods: Twenty-eight patients with stage I/II hypopharyngeal cancer (8 in stage I, 20 in stage II) were treated at Kyoto University Hospital between 1995 and 2007. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.490240DOI Listing
November 2010
5 Reads

The need for intranasal packing in endoscopic endonasal surgery.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):39-42

Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: The present findings indicate that conventional nasal packing is not required for endoscopic endonasal surgery.

Objectives: To evaluate the routine use of packing in endoscopic endonasal surgery.

Methods: From January 2006 through January 2009, 146 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic endonasal surgery performed by the same surgeon in Kyoto University Hospital were evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.486802DOI Listing
November 2010
3 Reads

Clinical and epidemiological study on inpatients with vertigo at the ENT Department of Kyoto University Hospital.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):34-8

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: The number of studies on inpatients with vertigo is limited. This study provides useful information for clarifying the underlying causes of vertigo.

Objective: To investigate the epidemiological features of patients with vertigo. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.490564DOI Listing
November 2010
5 Reads

Clinical study of vertigo in the outpatient clinic of Kyoto University Hospital.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):29-33

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: The epidemiology of vertigo remains unclear. This study might contribute to an understanding of the mechanisms underlying vestibular disease.

Objective: To investigate the epidemiological features of patients with vertigo. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.486800DOI Listing
November 2010
3 Reads

Multivariate analysis of hearing outcomes in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):24-8

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusions: Contralateral hearing loss is significantly correlated with poor hearing outcomes in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL).

Background: The hearing outcome in patients with ISSNHL was analyzed using multiple variables.

Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted using 89 patients with ISSNHL. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.487191DOI Listing
November 2010

An early mastoid cavity epithelialization technique using a postauricular pedicle periosteal flap for canal wall-down tympanomastoidectomy.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):20-3

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka.

Conclusions: Most ears that were treated with a new surgical method were rendered dry and safe, with cavity problems minimized by this simple technique. This technique is also valid in terms of medical economy because it shortens the hospitalization period and subsequent outpatient care is not required frequently.

Objectives: Canal wall-down tympanomastoidectomy was a well established procedure for severe chronic otitis media, especially cholesteatoma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.496463DOI Listing
November 2010
3 Reads

Management of labyrinthine fistulae in Kyoto University Hospital.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):16-9

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: In cases of labyrinthine fistulae, we performed complete removal of the cholesteatoma matrix in a one-stage procedure, resulting in a satisfactory bone conduction (BC) hearing preservation rate. Preoperative evaluation of labyrinthine fistulae using high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) detected 86% of cases, and this contributed to favorable results achieved with the surgical treatment of labyrinthine fistulae. We aimed to review cases of labyrinthine fistulae to summarize their outcomes and establish standards of management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.489232DOI Listing
November 2010
1 Read

Outcome of ossiculoplasty in Kyoto University Hospital.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):11-5

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: We performed ossiculoplasty under conditions preventing inflammation by adopting a planned staged operation, which is suitable for ossiculoplasty using an artificial prosthesis. We identified the presence of chorda tympani nerve as a candidate predictive factor for successful ossiculoplasty.

Objectives: We aimed to summarize the outcome of ossiculoplasty and to find factors to improve the success rate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.489231DOI Listing
November 2010
1 Read

Cochlear implantation in patients with prelingual hearing loss.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2010 Nov(563):4-10

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Conclusion: The average age at the time of cochlear implantation is progressively being reduced. While cochlear obstruction and perilymph/cerebello-spinal fluid gusher were found in some cases, preoperative MRI and CT scans were predictive of such occurrences. The preoperative developmental quotient in the Cognitive-Adaptive Area was strongly correlated to the postoperative development in the Language-Social Area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2010.487192DOI Listing
November 2010
1 Read

Neuromuscular junctions of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle in multiple system atrophy: a case study.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):115-9

Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan

Conclusion: The present study showed a variety of stages of neurogenic degeneration of the muscle fibers and the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle in multiple system atrophy (MSA). These findings coincide with abductor paralysis of vocal cords. Ultrastructural features of the NMJs of the PCA muscle in MSA were different from those of previous studies on experimental resection of recurrent nerve and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Read More

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June 2009
3 Reads

A relationship between mast cells and alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in the nasal polyps of chronic rhinosinusitis.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):110-4

Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.

Conclusion: These results suggest that mast cells (MCs) play a role in promoting nasal polyp (NP) formation and progression with alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA)-positive cells.

Objectives: We studied the quantification and the localization of MCs and myofibroblasts in NPs.

Patients And Methods: We examined NPs from 12 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery. Read More

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June 2009
5 Reads

Double-stranded RNA poly(I:C) enhances matrix metalloproteinase mRNA expression in human nasal polyp epithelial cells.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):105-9

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Conclusion: The significant up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 mRNA, which is not modulated by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, is an additional source of increased proteolytic activity in virus-infected upper airways that might contribute to the exacerbation of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.

Objectives: Chronic rhinosinusitis is often exacerbated by viral infection. We hypothesized that a disruption of the mechanisms that regulate the activity of MMPs during viral infection is one possible mechanism responsible for the exacerbation. Read More

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Expression of antiviral molecular genes in nasal polyp-derived cultured epithelial cells.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):101-4

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate the existence of natural immunity mechanisms via which viruses are eliminated from nasal and paranasal sinus mucosa.

Objectives: Acute sinusitis and acute aggravation of chronic sinusitis are often caused by bacteria, which are secondary to viral infection of the nose. Antiviral molecules are considered to be expressed and protect the host after viral infection. Read More

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Glucocorticoid receptor immunoreactivity of eosinophils in nasal polyps.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):95-100

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.

Conclusion: The higher level of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in cases of chronic sinusitis with bronchial asthma or allergic rhinitis suggests that glucocorticoids may exert a greater influence on eosinophils, thereby making them more effective in the treatment of polyps or chronic sinusitis.

Objectives: The GR immunoreactivity of eosinophils in nasal polyps was investigated to elucidate the mechanism by which glucocorticoids interact with eosinophils.

Materials And Methods: Nasal polyp specimens were divided into 3 groups: 7 patients with chronic sinusitis alone (CS only group), 12 patients with chronic sinusitis complicated by perennial allergic rhinitis (CS/AR group), and 6 patients with chronic sinusitis complicated by bronchial asthma except for aspirin-induced asthma (CS/asthma group). Read More

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Usefulness of curry odorant of odor stick identification test for Japanese in olfactory impairment screening.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):91-4

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Ishikawa, Japan.

Conclusion: The curry odorant of the odor stick identification test for Japanese (OSIT-J) is useful in screening for olfactory impairment in Japanese subjects.

Objective: The present study was designed to determine the most useful odorant of the OSIT-J in screening for olfactory impairment in Japanese subjects.

Subjects And Methods: We studied olfactory impairment screening with the OSIT-J in 83 participants (49 male, 34 female; average age 50 years) in an executive check-up at NTT West Kanazawa Hospital. Read More

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June 2009
4 Reads

Functional MRI of regional brain responses to 'pleasant' and 'unpleasant' odors.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):85-90

Department of Otolaryngology, Kobe University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan.

Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that functional MRI (fMRI) combined with a questionnaire is a useful method for studying the neuroanatomy of olfaction. Further studies with various odorants and questionnaires would provide an even better understanding of the mechanism of olfactory perception.

Objectives: To better understand the mechanism of odorant perception in the central nervous system. Read More

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June 2009
1 Read

Functional optical hemodynamic imaging of the olfactory cortex in normosmia subjects and dysosmia subjects.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):79-84

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan.

Conclusion: These activated areas may be related to the orbitofrontal cortex, corresponding to olfactory cortices. This study shows that multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables the evaluation of brain activity of normosmia subjects and dysosmia subjects by olfactory stimulation.

Objective: Objective olfactory testing is not common. Read More

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June 2009
12 Reads

Taste disturbance after stapes surgery--clinical and experimental study.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):71-8

Department of Otolaryngology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan.

Conclusion: Most of the clinical cases experienced taste disturbance after stapes surgery, and in a few cases this disturbance persisted for a long time. The animal experiment suggested the role of geniculate ganglion (GG) cells in nerve generation.

Objectives: To clinically examine taste disorder and its recovery after stapes surgery and experimentally demonstrate a role of GG. Read More

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June 2009
2 Reads

Localization of aquaporins, water channel proteins, in the mouse eustachian tube.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):67-70

Department of Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.

Conclusion: Immunolocalization of the subtypes of water channel proteins, aquaporins (AQPs), was detected in the mouse eustachian tube (ET). AQPs are located continuously from the serous glands and the capillary vessels to the luminal side in the ET epithelium and may play an important role in the transportation of water to the surface of the ET lumen through the epithelium.

Objectives: Although the water supply to the surface of the ET lumen is considered to be essential for closing of the ET, the pathway of the water in the ET is not fully understood. Read More

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Oxygen consumption by bacteria: a possible cause of negative middle ear pressure in ears with otitis media.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):63-6

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

Conclusions: Oxygen consumption by bacteria could be a cause of the negative middle ear pressure in ears with otitis media (OM).

Objective: To determine whether oxygen consumption by bacteria could be a cause for production of negative pressure in ears with OM.

Materials And Methods: Hermetically sealed bottles containing high dose (group A) and low dose (group B) of Streptococcus pneumoniae with air space and maintained at 37 degrees C in a water bath were connected to a micropressure sensor. Read More

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Poly(I:C) synergizes with Th2 cytokines to induce TARC/CCL17 in middle ear fibroblasts established from mucosa of otitis media with effusion.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):57-62

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan.

Conclusion: These results suggest that middle ear fibroblasts contribute to the recruitment of Th2 cells into the middle ear by producing thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC).

Objectives: Intractable otitis media is more common in atopic subjects and asthmatics than in the otherwise normal population. Although type 2 T helper (Th2) cytokines play crucial roles in the middle ear of these populations, the mechanism underlying the predominance of Th2 cytokines has yet to be clarified. Read More

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June 2009
3 Reads

A case with posterior fossa epidermoid cyst showing audiovestibular symptoms caused by insufficiency of anterior inferior cerebellar artery--usefulness of free DICOM image viewing and processing software.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):53-6

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

A 58-year-old Japanese man suddenly suffered from vertigo. On physical examination, left-beating horizontal torsional spontaneous nystagmus was observed; the direction did not change with gaze. Other neurotological examinations revealed findings within normal limits except the left side sensorineural hearing loss of approximately 32 dB on average. Read More

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Two cases of spinal cord extramedullary tumor with positional vertiginous sensation.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):50-2

Department of Otolaryngology, Osaka University, School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan.

Conclusions: We conclude that neck imaging should be carried out for patients with persistent paroxysmal positional vertigo following diagnostic and/or therapeutic maneuvers.

Objective: It is sometimes complicated to diagnose patients with vertigo that is transiently induced by head and neck positioning. Neck-vestibular diseases also induce vertiginous sensation with head and neck movement and need to be ruled out for the diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Read More

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June 2009
3 Reads

Subjective visual vertical test in patients with chronic dizziness without abnormal findings in routine vestibular function tests.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):46-9

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

Conclusion: The subjective visual vertical (SVV) test can detect abnormality of the otolithic organs and the graviceptive pathways present in a considerable number of patients having dizziness but presenting no abnormal findings in conventional vestibular function tests.

Objective: To evaluate whether the SVV test can detect dysfunction of the otolithic organs and perception of gravity in patients with dizziness having no abnormal finding on routine tests for the vestibular system.

Patients And Methods: Forty-four patients who complained of chronic dizziness but had no abnormal finding on routine tests for vestibular system and on brain MRI studies were selected between 2004 and 2006. Read More

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June 2009
6 Reads

Estimation of factors influencing the results of tinnitus retraining therapy.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):40-5

Department of Otolaryngology, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan.

Conclusion: The factors of tinnitus loudness and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) score in tinnitus patients have the potential to relate to therapeutic results of tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT).

Objectives: To confirm what factors in tinnitus influence the results of TRT.

Patients And Methods: Twelve factors were investigated in 53 patients with tinnitus, examining the relationship between these factors and the results of TRT. Read More

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June 2009
2 Reads

Comparison between bone-conducted ultrasound and audible sound in speech recognition.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):34-9

Department of Otolaryngology, Nara Medical University, Kashihara Nara, Japan.

Conclusion: This study showed that it is possible to transmit language information using bone-conducted ultrasound (BCU) in normal-hearing subjects. Our results suggest the possibility of a difference in speech recognition between BCU and air-conducted audible sound (ACAS).

Objective: Ultrasound was audible when delivered by bone conduction. Read More

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June 2009
7 Reads

N1m amplitude growth function for bone-conducted ultrasound.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):28-33

Department of Otolaryngology, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Japan.

Conclusion: N1m growth indicates the differences in central auditory processing between bone-conducted ultrasound and air-conducted audible sound.

Objectives: Bone conduction enables ultrasound to be heard by the human ear. Despite many studies, the perceptual mechanism of bone-conducted ultrasound has not yet been clarified completely. Read More

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June 2009
2 Reads

Prednisolone prevents transient ischemia-induced cochlear damage in gerbils.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):24-7

Department of Otolaryngology, Ehime University School of Medicine, Ehime, Japan.

Conclusions: Prednisolone protects against inner ear damage, even when administered after ischemic injury in Mongolian gerbils.

Objective: The effect of prednisolone on ischemia-induced cochlear damage was investigated in Mongolian gerbils.

Materials And Methods: The bilateral vertebral arteries were occluded for 15 min to transiently induce cochlear ischemia, followed by an intraperitoneal injection of prednisolone (1 mg/kg) or physiological saline (control). Read More

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June 2009
6 Reads

Heme oxygenase-1 expression in the guinea pig cochlea induced by intense noise stimulation.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):18-23

Department of Otolaryngology, National Defense Medical College, Saitama, Japan.

Conclusion: These results suggest that noise induces free radical formation in the cochlea and that, in the guinea pig, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) may play an important role in the recovery from noise trauma in the organ of Corti.

Objective: Free radicals are involved in noise-induced hearing loss. It has been demonstrated that the induction of HO-1 may protect cells exposed to oxidative challenge. Read More

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June 2009
1 Read

Analysis of gene expression profiles along the tonotopic map of mouse cochlea by cDNA microarrays.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):12-7

Department of Otolaryngology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan.

Conclusion: This study demonstrated differential gene expression profiles along the axis of the mouse cochlea. It also suggests the mechanism that establishes the tonotopic organization.

Objectives: The molecular basis of the tonotopic mapping of the mammalian cochlea remains unclear. Read More

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June 2009
1 Read

Reelin-disabled-1 signaling in the mature rat cochlear nucleus.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Jun(562):7-11

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya-City, Japan.

Conclusion: Immunohistochemical detection of Reelin in granular cells and disabled-1 in cochlear nucleus suggests a possible Reelin signaling pathway in mature rat cochlear nucleus.

Materials And Methods: Six-week-old Wister rats were used throughout this study. The expression of reelin and disabled-1 were studied by using in situ hybridization technique and immunohistochemistry. Read More

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June 2009
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The vascularization of the human cochlea: its historical background.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 (561):3-16

ENT & HNS, CH-1003 Lausanne, Switzerland.

The history of vascularization of the human cochlea began with the first anatomical description of the cochlea in the 16th century. Three different periods are recognizable in the development of knowledge concerning this subject: the macroscopic period, with the description of the structure of the cochlea from the 16th to the 19th century; the microscopic period, with the description of the part of the organ of Corti in the 19th century; and the injection period, with the description of the fine vascularization of the cochlea in the 20th century. Various techniques were used during these three periods, which will be presented here, using only original references. Read More

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2582694/
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1005719/
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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0001648090292446
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480902924469DOI Listing
July 2009
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3D computerized model of endolymphatic hydrops from specimens of temporal bone.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Feb(560):43-7

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

Conclusion: The 3D models of endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces enabled us to obtain normal and pathological volumes of each space and helped us to understand the 3D structure of various parts of the inner ear and of endolymphatic hydrops.

Objective: To make a 3D model of the inner ear using sections of temporal bone with and without hydrops.

Materials And Methods: Every 10th 20 microm thick section of temporal bone was collected from two ears with endolymphatic hydrops and five ears without hydrops. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480902729868DOI Listing
February 2009
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A comparison of two methods of using transtympanic electrocochleography for the diagnosis of Meniere's disease: click summating potential/action potential ratio measurements and tone burst summating potential measurements.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Feb(560):38-42

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Conclusion: Transtympanic electrocochleography (TT ECochG) is helpful for the confirmation of Meniere's disease using tone burst stimuli to measure the amplitude of the frequency specific summating potentials (SP) but not when using the click evoked summating potential versus action potential ratio (SP/AP).

Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of TT ECochG as a means of confirming the clinical diagnosis of Meniere's disease.

Patients And Methods: A total of 2,717 patients were referred for TT ECochG between August 1998 and September 2008. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480902729843DOI Listing
February 2009
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Chronological changes in the eighth cranial nerve compound action potential (CAP) in experimental endolymphatic hydrops: the effects of altering the polarity of click sounds.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Feb(560):32-7

Department of Otolaryngology, Nishi Fukuoka Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.

Conclusion: Using a guinea pig model of experimental endolymphatic hydrops, click sounds of altered polarity showed different latencies and amplitudes in hydropic compared with normal cochleae. Latency changes appeared as early as 1 week after endolymphatic obstruction. This method can help diagnose endolymphatic hydrops. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480902729835DOI Listing
February 2009
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Visualization of inner ear disorders with MRI in vivo: from animal models to human application.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Feb(560):22-31

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Tampere Medical School, Tampere, Finland.

Conclusion: The inner ear membranous permeability and leakiness and endolymphatic hydrops can be visualized using gadolinium-enhanced MRI in both rodents and man. Intratympanic administration of contrast agent gives greater perilymphatic loading of gadolinium.

Objectives: Visualization of different types of inner ear dysfunction in MRI with intravenous or intratympanic administration of contrast agent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480902729850DOI Listing
February 2009
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Cutting edge of inner ear MRI.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Feb(560):15-21

Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65, Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550, Japan.

Conclusion: Recent advances in clinical MR imagers, such as the 3-Tesla, multi-channel phased-array coil and novel pulse sequences, allow the evaluation of subtle alterations in the inner ear fluid environments and breakdown of the blood-labyrinthine barrier. Intratympanic injection of Gd-DTPA allows the imaging detection of endolymphatic hydrops in patients.

Objectives: To describe the current status of inner ear MRI and future directions for imaging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480902729819DOI Listing
February 2009

Clinical significance of endolymphatic imaging after intratympanic gadolinium injection.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Feb(560):9-14

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65, Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8550, Japan.

Conclusion: Using three-dimensional real inversion recovery (3D-real IR) and three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), various degrees of endolymphatic hydrops were observed in the basal and upper turns of the cochlea and in the vestibular apparatus after intratympanic gadolinium (Gd) injection. MRI may contribute to our understanding of inner ear diseases and may be a useful addition to intratympanic drug therapy in the management of inner ear diseases.

Objective: To evaluate 3D-real IR MRI and 3D-FLAIR MRI with clinical symptoms and signs in patients with inner ear disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480902729801DOI Listing
February 2009
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Grading of endolymphatic hydrops using magnetic resonance imaging.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2009 Feb(560):5-8

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65, Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550, Japan.

Conclusion: Grading of endolymphatic hydrops in the vestibule and the cochlea using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is proposed (2008 Nagoya scale).

Objective: To standardize the evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops in both the vestibule and the cochlea using MRI.

Patients And Methods: The endolymphatic space was evaluated after intratympanic gadolinium injection using three-dimensional fluid attenuated (3D-FLAIR) MRI and three-dimensional real inversion recovery (3D-real IR) MRI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016480902729827DOI Listing
February 2009
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