100 results match your criteria Academy Of Management Journal[Journal]


AFFECT AND THE FRAMING EFFECT WITHIN INDIVIDUALS OVER TIME: RISK TAKING IN A DYNAMIC INVESTMENT SIMULATION.

Acad Manage J 2010 Apr;53(2):411-431

Boston College.

We examined the role of affect (pleasant or unpleasant feelings) and decision frames (gains or losses) in risk taking in a 20-day stock investment simulation in which 101 participants rated their current feelings while making investment decisions. As predicted, affect attenuated the relationships between decision frames and risk taking. After experiencing losses, individuals made more risky choices, in keeping with the framing effect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/AMJ.2010.49389383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4580376PMC
April 2010
1 Read

BEING EMOTIONAL DURING DECISION MAKING-GOOD OR BAD? AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION.

Acad Manage J 2007 Aug;50(4):923-940

This paper examines the link between affective experience and decision-making performance. In a stock investment simulation, 101 stock investors rated their feelings on an Internet Web site while making investment decisions each day for 20 consecutive business days. Contrary to the popular belief that feelings are generally bad for decision making, we found that individuals who experienced more intense feelings achieved higher decision-making performance. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2361392PMC
August 2007
1 Read

Occupational stress, social support, and the costs of health care.

Acad Manage J 1996 Jun;39(3):738-50

New Mexico State University, USA.

Relationships among health care costs, social support, and occupational stress are investigated. Health care cost data were collected over two years for 260 working individuals. Multiple regression analyses were used to control for initial health care costs, age, and gender in predicting later costs; independent variables were stress, strain, social support, and their interactions. Read More

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Responses to health and safety risk in the work environment.

Authors:
D L McLain

Acad Manage J 1995 Dec;38(6):1726-43

Virginia State University, USA.

The subjective experience of workplace health and safety risk among exposed individuals is little understood. Health and safety risks are associated with multifaceted subjective interpretations different from those associated with other elements of the work environment and more directly influential on work attitudes and behavior than actual risk. This article conceptually and operationally defines these interpretations and evidences the influence of chronic risk exposure on job satisfaction, stress, and distraction from work tasks. Read More

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December 1995

Employer involvement in eldercare: an organizational adaptation perspective.

Authors:
J Goodstein

Acad Manage J 1995 Dec;38(6):1657-71

Washington State University, Vancouver, USA.

Social and demographic changes represent an important environmental challenge to organizations. Recent demographic changes in the United States have increased the potential importance of "eldercare" benefits in the workplace. In this research, I elaborate a number of important organizational and environmental determinants that influence the recognition and interpretation of eldercare issues and relate these considerations to the level of employer involvement in the care of elderly dependents, or eldercare. Read More

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December 1995

Leader-follower exchange quality: the role of personal and interpersonal attributes.

Acad Manage J 1994 Aug;37(4):990-1001

Southeastern Louisiana University.

A field study of 84 registered nurses and their supervisors revealed that leaders' perceptions of leader-follower attitudinal similarity and follower extraversion were positively related to the quality of leader-follower exchanges. Neither followers' locus of control nor growth need strength was found to be significantly correlated with the quality of the exchange between leaders and followers. Read More

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Citizenship behavior and social exchange.

Acad Manage J 1994 Jun;37(3):656-69

A.B. Freeman School of Business, Tulane University.

This article develops and empirically examines a social exchange model of organizational citizenship behavior. An employee's trust in a supervisor is proposed to mediate the relationship between procedural fairness in the supervisor's decision making and employee citizenship. Data from 475 hospital employees and their supervisors were consistent with our model. Read More

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June 1994
19 Reads

Investor response to health care cost containment legislation: is American health policy designed to fail?

Authors:
C K Jacobson

Acad Manage J 1994 Apr;37(2):440-52

Arizona State University.

Two failed congressional attempts to control escalating health costs are examined. The data show that investors apparently anticipated their failure. With the implementation of a policy encouraging market competition, however, investors expected larger firms to benefit and firms with previously high profit growth rates to lose. Read More

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April 1994
1 Read

Symbolic processes in the implementation of technological change: a symbolic interactionist study of work computerization.

Authors:
P Prasad

Acad Manage J 1993 Dec;36(6):1400-29

University of Calgary.

This study examined the symbolic processes involved in the computerization of work in a health maintenance organization. Guided by symbolic interaction as a methodological framework, this inductive study used the methods of participant observation and in-depth interviewing for gathering data. It documents the multiple symbols associated with computerization in the organization and discusses local interpretations of those symbolic realities. Read More

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December 1993

Effects of stressful job demands and control on physiological and attitudinal outcomes in a hospital setting.

Acad Manage J 1993 Apr;36(2):289-318

Mankato State University.

We tested the job demands--job control model of stress with a group of 136 registered nurses. Significant interactions between subjective and objective measures of work load and a measure of perceived control predicting physiological and attitudinal outcomes indicated support for the model. In addition, objectively assessed job demands were significantly associated with blood pressure and cortisol levels. Read More

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April 1993
16 Reads

Strategic sensemaking and organizational performance: linkages among scanning, interpretation, action, and outcomes.

Acad Manage J 1993 Apr;36(2):239-70

Smeal College of Business Administration, Pennsylvania State University.

This study investigated the strategic "sensemaking" processes of scanning, interpretation, and action and how those activities are linked to organizational performance. Using path analyses on data from 156 hospitals, we tested the direct and indirect effects among these sensemaking processes and performance outcomes and developed a model of their relationships. In a more general sense, the research represents an attempt to provide insight not only into relationships between cognition and action, but also into the links between those fundamental processes and organizational performance outcomes. Read More

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Performance effects of information asymmetry and economies of scope in diversified service firms.

Authors:
P R Nayyar

Acad Manage J 1993 Feb;36(1):28-57

Leonard N. Stern School of Business, New York University.

This study examined the performance effects of information asymmetry and economies of scope in diversified service firms. Tests using both accounting- and stock-market-based measures of performance revealed that information asymmetry improved performance more than economies of scope. As hypothesized, the benefits of information asymmetry were greater for firms offering services whose quality cannot be determined until after their purchase (experience services), and the benefits of economies of scope were greater for firms offering services whose quality can be determined prior to purchase (search services). Read More

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February 1993

Contact with AIDS patients as a source of work-related distress: effects of organizational and social support.

Acad Manage J 1993 Feb;36(1):157-71

Department of Management, Texas A&M University.

In this study, we hypothesized that a nurse's exposure to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients as part of the work role is positively associated with distress as indexed by negative mood at work. Given this expected relation, we sought to identify factors that might reduce the negative effects of caring for AIDS patients on nurses. We predicted that both organizational and social support would moderate the relationship between extent of exposure and negative mood, with the relationship being strongest when support is low and weakest when support is high. Read More

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February 1993
1 Read

Adoption and abandonment of matrix management programs: effects of organizational characteristics and interorganizational networks.

Acad Manage J 1993 Feb;36(1):106-38

College of Business and Public Administration, University of Arizona.

Organizational design theorists argue that organizations adopt matrix (departmentalized) structures for technical reasons, to solve problems of internal coordination and information processing. Research on interorganizational networks suggests that organizations adopt new structures because of mimetic forces and normative pressures. We examined the effects of both sets of factors on the adoption of matrix management in a group of hospitals. Read More

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February 1993

The past is the past--or is it? The use of retrospective accounts as indicators of past strategy.

Authors:
B R Golden

Acad Manage J 1992 Oct;35(4):848-60

Graduate School of Business, University of Texas at Austin.

This study challenges the common assumption that retrospective accounts of business strategy are reliable and valid. Chief executives reported their firms' current strategies, and two years later, they reported their firms' strategies of two years earlier. Of these retrospective accounts, 58 percent did not agree with the previous and validated reports of past strategy. Read More

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October 1992

Institutional and strategic choice perspectives on board involvement in the strategic decision process.

Acad Manage J 1992 Oct;35(4):766-94

College of Business Administration, University of Tennessee.

The level of a board of directors' involvement in strategic decisions can be viewed as an institutional response or as a strategic adaptation to external pressures for greater board involvement. We examined the antecedents and effects of board involvement from both the institutional and strategic choice perspectives. Data obtained from personal interviews with 114 board members and archival records indicated that board size and levels of diversification and insider representation were negatively related to board involvement, and organizational age was positively related to it. Read More

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October 1992
1 Read

A derivation of the underlying constructs of just-in-time management systems.

Acad Manage J 1992 Aug;35(3):653-70

Wright State University, Dayton, OH.

Researchers have recommended that the theoretical constructs underlying just-in-time (JIT) management systems be identified and developed if JIT is to be fully understood and its full capabilities realized. In this study, we advanced this conceptual development through an instrument based on the relevant literature and empirically deriving three underlying constructs: (1) operating structure and control, (2) product scheduling, and (3) quality implementation. We report a content analysis of these constructs and develop propositions regarding their relationships, predecessors, and outcomes. Read More

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Power in top management teams: dimensions, measurement, and validation.

Authors:
S Finkelstein

Acad Manage J 1992 Aug;35(3):505-38

University of Southern California.

Top managers' power plays a key role in strategic decision making. However, although numerous scholars have recognized its importance, very few have attempted to measure the phenomenon. In this article, I present a set of dimensions measuring top managers' power and suggest a measurement methodology to facilitate empirical inquiry. Read More

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August 1992
63 Reads

Decision-making participation patterns: the role of organizational context.

Authors:
P E Connor

Acad Manage J 1992 Mar;35(1):218-31

Atkinson Graduate School of Management, Willamette University.

Patterns of employees' participation in a number of specific decisions were studied in 101 Oregon nursing homes. The inquiry concerned whether such patterns vary according to the contextual properties of facility size, skill level, and profit-making orientation. Although interaction effects varied, main-effect results were strong. Read More

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Information processing and problem solving: the migration of problems through formal positions and networks of ties.

Acad Manage J 1991 Dec;34(4):918-28

Boston College.

A study of the flow of information about organizational problems was conducted. We found that managers often avoided passing problems to formally designated problem solvers and used personal ties to forward information to problem solvers. The strength of ties between individuals had a weak effect on passing problems across professional boundaries. Read More

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December 1991

Organizational performance and adaptation: effects of environment and performance on changes in board composition.

Acad Manage J 1991 Dec;34(4):805-26

Graduate School of Business, Columbia University.

This study examined performance as a moderator of organizational adaptation to environmental change. Change in the composition of boards of directors was examined as a dependent variable reflecting organizational attempts to deal with changing external contingencies. We tested specific hypotheses in an analysis of 290 California hospitals over a seven-year period. Read More

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December 1991
1 Read

Isomorphism and external support in conflicting institutional environments: a study of drug abuse treatment units.

Acad Manage J 1991 Sep;34(3):636-61

Department of Psychology, University of Michigan.

Using institutional theory, we developed predictions about organizational units that moved from an environment making consistent demands to one making conflicting demands. Many community mental health centers have diversified into drug abuse treatment. The units providing those services face conflicting demands from the traditional mental health sector and the new drug abuse treatment sector about which clients to serve, how to assess their problems, and who should provide treatment. Read More

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September 1991

Antecedents and outcomes of decision speed in different environmental contexts.

Authors:
W Q Judge A Miller

Acad Manage J 1991 Jun;34(2):449-63

University of Tennessee.

This study refined and extended some findings of previous research on decision-making speed. Decision speed was associated with simultaneous consideration of many alternatives, regardless of context. In contrast, the relationship between board experience and decision speed was context-specific. Read More

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Turbulence at the top: a new perspective on governance structure changes and strategic change.

Acad Manage J 1991 Jun;34(2):306-30

Washington State University, Vancouver.

Organizational theorists have traditionally focused attention on the relationship between chief executive officer (CEO) succession and strategic change. This study extends that perspective and explores the effects of changes in an organization's management, ownership, and board of directors on the process of strategic change. The results of this research suggest that changes in ownership and board have significant independent and interactive effects on strategic change. Read More

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Effects of compensation strategy on job pay decisions.

Authors:
C L Weber S L Rynes

Acad Manage J 1991 Mar;34(1):86-109

New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University.

Previous research has revealed but not explained the occurrence of wide variations in pay for the same job, even within a single local labor market. We investigated how compensation managers from a wide variety of organizations combined information about current job pay rates, market rates, and job evaluation points to arrive at new pay rates. In addition, we examined the role of organizational pay leadership position and external or internal orientation in decisions about job pay, controlling for differences in organizational demographic characteristics. Read More

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Adaptive change in corporate control practices.

Authors:
J A Alexander

Acad Manage J 1991 Mar;34(1):162-93

Department of Health Services Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan.

Multidivisional organizations are not concerned with what structure to adopt but with how they should exercise control within the divisional form to achieve economic efficiencies. Using an information-processing framework, I examined control arrangements between the headquarters and operating divisions of such organizations and how managers adapted control practices to accommodate increasing environmental uncertainty. Also considered were the moderating effects of contextual attributes on such adaptive behavior. Read More

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Perceptual and archival measures of Miles and Snow's strategic types: a comprehensive assessment of reliability and validity.

Acad Manage J 1990 Dec;33(4):817-32

Northwestern University.

Despite the widespread research use of Miles and Snow's typology of strategic orientations, there have been no systematic attempts to assess the reliability and validity of its various measures. The present work provides such an assessment using data collected at two points from over 400 organizations in the hospital industry. We examined dimensions of the typology using both perceptual self-typing and archival data from multiple sources. Read More

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December 1990

Small firm adaptation: responses of physicians' organizations to regulatory and competitive uncertainty.

Authors:
N M Carter

Acad Manage J 1990 Jun;33(2):307-33

Marquette University.

This study addressed the pattern of small organizations' adaptation responses to uncertainty in the regulatory and competitive sectors of their environment using data from physicians in solo practice. An existing general model of adaptation was modified to reflect small-firm work processes. The result is a four-cell model that distinguishes adaptive strategies in terms of their functional orientations and how firms pursue them--whether alone or in collaboration with other firms. Read More

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Absenteeism among hospital nurses: an idiographic-longitudinal analysis.

Acad Manage J 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53

For several months, nurses completed ratings of the degree to which certain events relevant to absence were present during each of their scheduled workdays. The event ratings for days when the nurses decided to be absent were then compared with those for days when the nurses attended. As expected, certain events, such as ill health and tiredness, tended to covary and proved to be consistently related to absenteeism across nurses. Read More

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Environmental and organizational predictors of adoption of cost containment policies in hospitals.

Authors:
K G Provan

Acad Manage J 1987 Jun;30(2):219-39

This study examined predictors of the adoption of cost containment policies in a national sample of 303 not-for-profit hospitals. Analysis of the full sample indicated that adoption of such policies was positively related to response to external regulation, cooperative interorganizational involvement, external orientation, number of beds, occupancy rate, and the influence of chief administrators on governing boards; adoption was negatively related to length of patients' stays. Additional exploratory analysis of the data revealed different combinations of characteristics that were unique to subgroups of hospitals with the lowest and highest levels of policy adoption. Read More

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Employee voice and employee retention.

Authors:
D G Spencer

Acad Manage J 1986 Sep;29(3):488-502

This study investigates the relationship between the extent to which employees have opportunities to voice dissatisfaction and voluntary turnover in 111 short-term, general care hospitals. Results show that, whether or not a union is present, high numbers of mechanisms for employee voice are associated with high retention rates. Implications for theory and research as well as management practice are discussed. Read More

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September 1986
1 Read

The fit between technology and structure as a predictor of performance in nursing subunits.

Acad Manage J 1985 Dec;28(4):844-59

Regression analyses of field study data from 27 nursing subunits supported the hypothesis that a simple measure of fit between technology and structure is better predictor of quality of care than either technology or structure alone, or the two together. The results of this study were thus consistent with the growing body of congruency literature, and they suggest that a simple measure of structure may be quite useful in such research. Read More

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December 1985

Attitudinal differences among work shifts: what do they reflect?

Authors:
M F Peterson

Acad Manage J 1985 Sep;28(3):723-32

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September 1985

Employees absenteeism: the role of ease of movement.

Acad Manage J 1985 Jun;28(2):464-71

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Outcomes of role stress: a multisample constructive replication.

Acad Manage J 1985 Jun;28(2):363-75

Responses from four separate samples of accountants and hospital employees provided a constructive replication of the Bedeian and Armenakis (1981) model of the causal nexus between role stress and selected outcome variables. We investigated the relationship between both role ambiguity and role conflict--as specific forms of role stress--and job-related tension, job satisfaction, and propensity to leave, using LISREL IV, a technique capable of providing statistical data for a hypothesized population model, as well as for specific causal paths. Results, which support the Bedeian and Armenakis model, are discussed in light of previous research. Read More

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Managerial work behavior: an integration of results from two major approaches.

Authors:
W Whitely

Acad Manage J 1985 Jun;28(2):344-62

This study integrates results from two major approaches to studying managerial work, one focusing on work content, the other on work process. Clusters of managers having similar work behaviors were first identified in terms of each approach, and major differences among the manager clusters were described. The study next found a moderate convergence in the results of the two approaches. Read More

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A catastrophe model of employee withdrawal leading to low job performance, high absenteeism, and job turnover during the first year of employment.

Authors:
J E Sheridan

Acad Manage J 1985 Mar;28(1):88-109

A catastrophe model of employee withdrawal indicates that declining job performance, absenteeism, and turnover are discontinuous behavioral outcomes of the same withdrawal phenomenon arising from varying levels of job tension and group cohesion. The advantages of using catastrophe models to describe the temporal changes in employee withdrawal over a relatively short time period are discussed. Read More

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March 1985
1 Read

Technology and interorganizational activity as predictors of client referrals.

Authors:
K G Provan

Acad Manage J 1984 Dec;27(4):811-29

The client referral activity of 41 human service agencies operating within the same community was examined using recently collected data. Hypotheses were developed focusing on agency service technology and interagency activity as predictors of referrals from and to other organizations. The hypothesis for technology was supported; hypotheses for interagency activity received mixed support. Read More

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December 1984

Evaluating the management journals: a second look.

Authors:
R Coe I Weinstock

Acad Manage J 1984 Sep;27(3):660-6

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September 1984

The choice of strategic alternatives under increasing regulation in high technology companies.

Authors:
P H Birnbaum

Acad Manage J 1984 Sep;27(3):489-510

The strategic response of U.S. high technology companies in the medical X-ray manufacturing industry to increased governmental regulations from 1962 to 1977 is examined. Read More

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September 1984

A longitudinal analysis of the antecedents of organizational commitment.

Acad Manage J 1984 Mar;27(1):95-112

From longitudinal data from 129 nursing department employees, organizational commitment was found to be antecedent to job satisfaction rather than an outcome of it. Furthermore, several other variables were found to be causally related to satisfaction but not commitment. Implications of unsubstantiated assumptions regarding causes of commitment are discussed. Read More

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The psychology of the withdrawal process: a cross-validational test of Mobley's intermediate linkages model of turnover in two samples.

Acad Manage J 1984 Mar;27(1):79-94

A study investigating the validity of Mobley's (1977) model of the intermediate linkages in the turnover decision process among employees working in two diverse settings yielded a pattern of results generally consistent with the model. However, except for commitment to the organization, regression analyses failed to double cross-validate either within or between samples. Read More

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Contextual model of leadership influence in hospital units.

Acad Manage J 1984 Mar;27(1):57-78

Using Kerr and Jermier's (1978) taxonomy of substitute and neutralizer variables, the contextual model indicates that the staff nurse's education, group cohesion, and work technology substitute for the head nurse's leadership behavior by having direct and indirect effects on job performance. The hospital's administrative climate appeared to neutralize leadership influence. Read More

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Criteria for grouping nursing subunits in hospitals.

Authors:
P Leatt R Schneck

Acad Manage J 1984 Mar;27(1):150-65

Data from 135 nursing subunits were used to identify a set of organizational variables that best explained the grouping of activities into nursing subunits in hospitals. Relatively strong support was provided for technology as a basis for grouping nursing subunits; characteristics of the hospital, including its type, size, and location, also were relevant. Read More

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Synergy, influence, and information in the adoption of administrative innovations.

Authors:
M L Fennell

Acad Manage J 1984 Mar;27(1):113-29

The adoption processes of two related administrative innovations in the private sector dealing with employee health are examined. Results of multiple logistic regressions using survey data on a sample of Illinois firms suggest that these two innovations are synergistically linked, such that the adoption of one increases the likelihood of the subsequent adoption of the other. Read More

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Note on tension discharge rate as an employee health status predictor.

Acad Manage J 1983 Sep;26(3):540-5

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September 1983

Cusp catastrophe model of employee turnover.

Acad Manage J 1983 Sep;26(3):418-36

A cusp catastrophe model is developed to explain job turnover of nursing employees. The temporal dynamics of the catastrophe model suggest that leavers experience lower organization commitment than do stayers prior to termination. Leavers' perceptions of job tension and commitment appear to cross the threshold levels prior to the termination dates. Read More

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September 1983
8 Reads

A measure of styles of handling interpersonal conflict.

Authors:
M A Rahim

Acad Manage J 1983 Jun;26(2):368-76

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