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    575 results match your criteria AACN Advanced Critical Care[Journal]

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    Adiposity and the Role of Neuroendocrine Hormones in Energy Balance.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(3):284-288
    Heather Roff is Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, Donor Network West, 12667 Alcosta Boulevard #500, San Ramon, CA 94583 Colette Jappy is Clinical Nurse Specialist, Kaiser Permanente, Redwood City, CA
    Obesity is a worldwide health concern and, given the risk for developing associated co-morbidities that increase mortality, obesity has health implications for individuals and populations. Obesity involves multifactorial regulatory mechanisms, and recognition of these mechanisms will enhance the care critical care nurses provide to their patients. This article reviews the general physiological mechanisms of energy storage and the regulation of adiposity related to key neuroendocrine hormones. Read More

    Managing Care of Critically Ill Bariatric Patients.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(3):275-283
    Cheryl Holsworth is Senior Specialist Bariatric Surgery, Sharp Memorial Hospital, San Diego, California. Susan Gallagher is Senior Clinical Advisor, Celebration Institute Inc, 8790 Skyline Lane, Conroe, TX 77302
    Nearly 160 million Americans are overweight, obese, or morbidly obese. Morbid obesity and its numerous comorbidities are threats to a person's health. Moreover, hospitalized individuals living with adiposity-based chronic conditions are at risk for certain immobility hazards. Read More

    Comprehensive Care for Bariatric Surgery Patients.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(3):263-274
    Aura Petcu is Nurse Practitioner, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd, Mail Code UHS 8W, Portland, OR 97239
    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic, and those suffering from obesity have increased morbidity and mortality rates. There are various causes of obesity and many treatment options for patients suffering from obesity, including nonsurgical treatments. However, bariatric surgery is often the best choice for optimal weight loss and the attenuation of comorbidities. Read More

    Weight Bias and Psychosocial Implications for Acute Care of Patients With Obesity.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(3):254-262
    Rachel Smigelski-Theiss is Clinical Nurse Specialist, Queen's Medical Center, 1301 Punchbowl Street, Honolulu, HI 96813 Malisa Gampong is Nurse Manager, Queen's Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. Jill Kurasaki is Nurse Manager, Queen's Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.
    Obesity is a complex medical condition that has psychosocial and physiological implications for those suffering from the disease. Factors contributing to obesity such as depression, childhood experiences, and the physical environment should be recognized and addressed. Weight bias and stigmatization by health care providers and bedside clinicians negatively affect patients with obesity, hindering those patients from receiving appropriate care. Read More

    Pursuing the Clinical Track Faculty Role: From Clinical Expert to Educator.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(3):243-249
    Raymond R. Blush III is Clinical Assistant Professor at University of Michigan School of Nursing, Room 2304, 400 SNB North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Heidi L. Mason is Clinical Instructor, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Nicole M. Timmerman is Lecturer, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

    Pharmacologic Management of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Intensive Care Units.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(3):233-238
    Beatrice Adams is Critical Care Clinical Pharmacist, Medical and Burn Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pharmacy Services, Tampa General Hospital, PO Box 1289, Tampa, FL 33601 Kevin Ferguson is Critical Care Clinical Pharmacist, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pharmacy Services, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Florida.

    Atrioventricular Reentrant Tachycardia.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):223-228
    Karen M. Marzlin is Cardiology APRN, Aultman Hospital, Canton, Ohio, and Business Owner/Author/Educator/Consultant, Key Choice/Cardiovascular Nursing Education Associates, 4565 Venus Rd, Uniontown, OH 44685 Cynthia Webner is Business Owner/Author/Educator/Consultant, Key Choice/Cardiovascular Nursing Education Associates, North Canton, Ohio.

    Creating Clinical Research Protocols in Advanced Practice: Part IV, Designing Research to Fit Practice.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):210-217
    Myra Ellis is Clinical Nurse IV, Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit, Duke University Hospital, Durham, NC 27710 Lynn McGugan is Advanced Practice Nurse, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina. Jill Engel is Associate Vice President of Heart Operations, Nursing and Patient Care Services, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina. Bradi B. Granger is Director, Duke Heart Center Nursing Research Program, and Professor, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

    Implementing Family-Centered Care Through Facilitated Sensemaking.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):200-209
    Judy E. Davidson is Evidence-Based Practice and Research Nurse Liaison, University of California, San Diego Health, 200 W Arbor Drive 8929, San Diego, CA 92103 Sidney Zisook is Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, and San Diego Veteran's Administration Health Care System, San Diego, California.
    The Society of Critical Care Medicine has released updated recommendations for care of the family in neonatal, pediatric, and adult intensive care units. Translation of the recommendations into practice may benefit from a supporting theoretical framework. Facilitated sensemaking is a mid-range theory built from the same literature that formed the basis for recommendations within the guidelines. Read More

    Innovation and Technology: Electronic Intensive Care Unit Diaries.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):191-199
    Elizabeth A. Scruth is Clinical Practice Consultant, Clinical Effectiveness Team, Regional Quality and Regulatory Services, Kaiser Permanente, 1950 Franklin Street, 14th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 Nazanin Oveisi is Senior User Experience Design Lead, Amazon Web Services, Seattle, Washington. Vincent Liu is Research Scientist I, Division of Research Critical Care, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Santa Clara, California.
    Hospitalization in the intensive care unit can be a stressful time for patients and their family members. Patients' family members often have difficulty processing all of the information that is given to them. Therefore, an intensive care unit diary can serve as a conduit for synthesizing information, maintaining connection with patients, and maintaining a connection with family members outside the intensive care unit. Read More

    Measuring Outcomes of an Intensive Care Unit Family Diary Program.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):179-190
    Truong-Giang Huynh is ICU Assistant Nurse Manager, Jacobs Medical Center, University of California, San Diego Health, 9300 Campus Point Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 Miranda Covalesky is Clinical Nurse II, Jacobs Medical Center, University of California, San Diego Health, La Jolla, California. Samantha Sinclair is Clinical Nurse II, Jacobs Medical Center, University of California, San Diego Health, La Jolla, California. Heather Gunter is Clinical Nurse III, Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center, University of California, San Diego Health, La Jolla, California. Tamara Norton is Clinical Nurse III, Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center, University of California, San Diego Health, La Jolla, California. Alice Chen is Clinical Nurse III, Jacobs Medical Center, University of California, San Diego Health, La Jolla, California. Cassia Yi is Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center, University of California, San Diego Health, La Jolla, California.
    Patients discharged from intensive care units are at risk of short- and long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms known as post-intensive care syndrome. Family members of intensive care unit patients are at risk of similar symptoms known as post-intensive care syndrome-family. Both syndromes are common, and strategies to reduce risk factors should be employed. Read More

    Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit in a Model of Family-Centered Care.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):171-178
    Robert L. Owens is Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of California San Diego, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, La Jolla, CA 92037 Truong-Giang Huynh is ICU Assistant Nurse Manager, Jacobs Medical Center, University of California, San Diego Health, La Jolla, California. Giora Netzer is Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
    The desire for families to be physically present to support their loved ones in the intensive care unit, and guidelines in favor of this open visitation approach, require that clinicians consider both patient and family sleep. This article reviews the causes of poor sleep for patients and their family members in the intensive care unit as well as the expected changes in cognition and emotion that can result from sleep deprivation. Measures are proposed to improve the intensive care unit environment to promote family sleep. Read More

    Factors Influencing Active Family Engagement in Care Among Critical Care Nurses.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):160-170
    Breanna Hetland is Postdoctoral Fellow, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Ronald Hickman is Associate Professor, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Natalie McAndrew is Clinical Nurse Specialist, Medical Intensive Care Unit, The Medical College of Wisconsin-Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Barbara Daly is Professor, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
    Critical care nurses are vital to promoting family engagement in the intensive care unit. However, nurses have varying perceptions about how much family members should be involved. The Questionnaire on Factors That Influence Family Engagement was given to a national sample of 433 critical care nurses. Read More

    Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care in the Intensive Care Unit: A Dissemination Project.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):155-159
    Ruth Kleinpell is Director, Center for Clinical Research and Scholarship, Rush University Medical Center, and Professor, Rush University College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina Avenue, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL 60612 Timothy G. Buchman is Director, Emory Critical Care Center, and Professor, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Lori Harmon is Director of Quality, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Mount Prospect, Illinois. Melissa Nielsen is Communication Manager, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Mount Prospect, Illinois.
    Awareness of patient-centered and family-centered care research can assist clinicians to promote patient and family engagement in the intensive care unit. Project Dispatch (Disseminating Patient-Centered Outcomes Research to Healthcare Professionals) was developed to disseminate patient- and family-centered care research and encourage its application in clinical practice. The 3-year project involved the development of an interactive website platform, online educational programming, social media channels, a podcast and webcast series, and electronic and print media. Read More

    Implementing Intensive Care Unit Family-Centered Care: Resources to Identify and Address Gaps.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):148-154
    David Y. Hwang is Assistant Professor of Neurology, Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208018, New Haven, CT 06520 Robert El-Kareh is Associate Professor of Medicine, Divisions of Biomedical Informatics and Hospital Medicine, University of California, San Diego Health, La Jolla, California. Judy E. Davidson is Evidence-Based Practice and Research Nurse Liaison, University of California, San Diego Health, San Diego, California.
    During creation of the 2017 Society of Critical Care Medicine Guidelines for Family-Centered Care in the Intensive Care Unit, 2 implementation tools were developed to assist intensive care unit clinicians in incorporating the new recommendations into local practice: a gap analysis tool and a work tools document. The gap analysis tool helps intensive care unit teams rapidly develop unit- or organization-specific recommendations to enhance family-centered care and assess local barriers to implementation. The work tools document identifies readily available and tested resources that may further assist with action planning for change. Read More

    Implementing the SCCM Family-Centered Care Guidelines in Critical Care Nursing Practice.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):138-147
    Maureen Coombs is Professor, Clinical Nursing, The Graduate School of Nursing Midwifery and Health, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand Kathleen A. Puntillo is Professor Emeritus and Research Scientist, Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, California. Linda S. Franck is Jack and Elaine Koehn Endowed Chair in Pediatric Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, California. Elizabeth A. Scruth is Clinical Practice Consultant, Regional Quality and Regulatory Services, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California. Maurene A. Harvey is a Critical Care Educator and Consultant, Lake Tahoe, Nevada. Sandra M. Swoboda is Research Program Coordinator/Simulation Educator, Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine and Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland. Judy E. Davidson is Evidence-Based Practice and Research Nurse Liaison, University of California San Diego Health, San Diego, California.
    Family-centered care is an important component of holistic nursing practice, particularly in critical care, where the impact on families of admitted patients can be physiologically and psychologically burdensome. Family-centered care guidelines, developed by an international group of nursing, medical, and academic experts for the American College of Critical Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine, explore the evidence base in 5 key areas of family-centered care. Evidence in each of the guideline areas is outlined and recommendations are made about how critical care nurses can use this information in family-centered care practice. Read More

    Improving Health Care Provider Communication in End-of-Life Decision-Making.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):124-132
    Tracey Wilson is Nurse Practitioner Specialist, Medical Intensive Care Unit, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 Cathy Haut is Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, The Herman & Walter Samuelson Children's Hospital at Sinai, Baltimore, Maryland. Bimbola Akintade is Specialty Director, Trauma Critical Care at University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland.
    Critical care providers are responsible for many aspects of patient care, primarily focusing on preserving life. However, nearly 40% of patients who are admitted to an adult critical care unit will not survive. Initiating a conversation about end-of-life decision-making is a daunting task. Read More

    Supplementing Intensivist Staffing With Nurse Practitioners: Literature Review.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):111-123
    Tracie White is Adult Care Nurse Practitioner, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave South, Birmingham, AL 35294 Justin Kokiousis is Family Nurse Practitioner, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. Stephanie Ensminger is Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. Maria Shirey is Professor and Chair, Acute, Chronic, and Continuing Care, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Nursing, Birmingham, Alabama.
    In the United States, providing health care to critically ill patients is a challenge. An increase in patients older than 65 years, a decrease in critical care physicians, and a decrease in work hours for residents cause intensivist staffing issues. In this article, use of nurse practictioners to fill the intensive care unit intensivist staffing gap is assessed and evidence-based recommendations are identified to better incorporate nurse practitioners as part of intensive care unit intensivist staffing. Read More

    Pharmacokinetic Changes in Liver Failure and Impact on Drug Therapy.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(2):93-101
    Uyen Diep is Critical Care Clinical Pharmacist, Department of Pharmacy Services, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, FL 33601 Melissa Chudow is Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapeutics and Clinical Research, University of South Florida College of Pharmacy, Tampa, Florida. Katlynd M. Sunjic is Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapeutics and Clinical Research, University of South Florida College of Pharmacy, Tampa, Florida.

    Creating Clinical Research Protocols in Advanced Practice: Part III, Building Blocks of Study Design.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(1):74-83
    Jill Engel is Associate Chief Nursing Officer and Director of Patient Care Services at Duke University Hospital, DUMC Box 3442, Durham, NC 27710 Lynn McGugan is Advanced Practice Nurse, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina. Myra Ellis is Clinical Nurse IV, Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina.

    Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Case Vignettes.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(1):64-73
    Charlotte Garwood is Registered Nurse 2, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1211 Medical Center Dr, Nashville, TN 37232 Cass Piper Sandoval is Clinical Nurse Specialist, Adult Critical Care, University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, California. Robert Wonnacott is Senior Lead Nursing Informatics, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Craig Sadler is Staff Nurse, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Susan Dirkes is Staff Nurse, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
    The most common indication for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in critically ill patients is acute kidney injury with hemodynamic instability. Typically, the patient has metabolic disturbances and potential or actual fluid overload that require intervention. Certain critical care diagnoses and/or conditions or therapies present unique CRRT management approaches. Read More

    Considerations for Medication Management and Anticoagulation During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(1):51-63
    Ashley Thompson is Critical Care Pharmacist, Senior Pharmacist Supervisor, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center, and Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, UCSF School of Pharmacy, 533 Parnassus Ave. Box 0622, San Francisco, CA 94143 Fanny Li is Critical Care Pharmacist, UCSF Medical Center, and Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, UCSF School of Pharmacy, San Fran-cisco, California. A. Kendall Gross is Critical Care Pharmacist, UCSF Medical Center, and Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, UCSF School of Pharmacy, San Francisco, California.
    Providing safe and high-quality care to critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) includes adequate drug dosing and evaluation of patients' response to medications during therapy. Pharmacokinetic drug studies in acute kidney injury and CRRT are limited, considering the number of medications used in critical care. Therefore, it is important to understand the basic principles of drug clearance during CRRT by evaluating drug properties, CRRT modalities, and how they affect medication clearance. Read More

    Training and Maintaining: Developing a Successful and Dynamic Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Program.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(1):41-50
    Heather Przybyl is Clinical Education Specialist, Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix, 1111 E. Mc Dowell St, Phoenix, AZ 85006 Jill Evans is Nursing Director, Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona. Laurie Haley is Staff Nurse, Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit, and Facilitator, "New to CRRT" class and annual CRRT competencies, Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona. Jodi Bisek is Staff Nurse, Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit, and Facilitator, "New to CRRT" class and annual CRRT competencies, Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona. Emily Beck is Staff Nurse, Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit, and Facilitator, "New to CRRT" class and annual CRRT competencies, Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona.
    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is commonly used to support critically ill patients with acute kidney injury or chronic renal disease whose condition is too unstable for them to tolerate intermittent hemodialysis. Current publications related to CRRT programs in the United States and Canada note key themes related to the development and maintenance of CRRT training programs. A successful CRRT training program should consider and incorporate adult learning principles whenever possible. Read More

    Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Update: An Emphasis on Safe and High-Quality Care.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2017 ;28(1):31-40
    Hildy Schell-Chaple is Clinical Nurse Specialist, University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, 505 Parnassus Ave, San Francisco, CA 94143
    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was introduced more than 40 years ago as a renal support option for critically ill patients who had contraindications to intermittent hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Despite being the most common renal support therapy used in intensive care units today, the tremendous variability in CRRT management challenges the interpretation of findings from CRRT outcome studies. The lack of standardization in practice and training of clinicians along with the high risk of CRRT-related adverse events has been the impetus for the recent expert consensus work on identifying quality indicators for CRRT programs. Read More

    Creating Clinical Research Protocols in Advanced Practice: Part I, Identifying the Fit and the Aim.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2016 Jul;27(3):338-343
    Bradi B. Granger is Director, Heart Center Nursing Research Program, Duke University Health System and Associate Professor, Duke University School of Nursing, 307 Trent Dr, DUMC Box 3322, Durham, NC 27710 Jill Engel is Associate Chief Nursing Officer and Director of Patient Care Services at Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina.

    Clostridium difficile Infection and Fecal Microbiota Transplant.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2016 Jul;27(3):324-337
    Alyssa Liubakka is an Internal Medicine Resident, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street SE, MMC 284, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (e-mail: Byron P. Vaughn is an Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, and part of the Microbiota Therapeutics Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients. Although most patients have a clinical response to existing antimicrobial therapies, recurrent infection develops in up to 30% of patients. Fecal microbiota transplant is a novel approach to this complex problem, with an efficacy rate of nearly 90% in the setting of multiple recurrent CDI. Read More

    Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Solid Organ Transplant.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2016 Jul;27(3):316-323
    Michael Petty is Cardiothoracic Clinical Nurse Specialist, University of Minnesota Medical Center, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
    Within a little more than a decade, the transplant of human organs for end-stage organ disease became a reality. The early barriers to successful long-term graft and patient survival were related to the inability to effectively control the immune system such that it would not attack the donor tissue but would still recognize and destroy invading organisms and cells. As immunosuppressive therapy has been refined and proper matching of donors and recipients has been improved, hyperacute rejection has become a rare occurrence and acute rejection has been markedly controlled. Read More

    Balloon Pumps Inserted via the Subclavian Artery: Bridging the Way to Heart Transplant.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2016 Jul;27(3):301-315
    Catherine Murks is Nurse Practitioner, Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, University of Chicago Medicine, 5841 S. Maryland, MC 2016, Chicago, IL 60637 Colleen Juricek is Ventricular Assist Device Coordinator, Department of Surgery, Section of Cardiac Surgery, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
    Intra-aortic balloon pumps have traditionally been inserted via the femoral artery, limiting patients' activity and exposing patients to complications of immobility. For patients awaiting cardiac transplant, these complications may threaten a successful outcome, or at the least, complicate recuperation after transplant. A novel approach to insertion of balloon pumps via the subclavian artery is presented here, including routine nursing care, complications and related nursing actions, and experience with and advantages of this method. Read More

    "Awake" Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge to Lung Transplant.
    AACN Adv Crit Care 2016 Jul;27(3):293-300
    Sara K. Kearns is ECMO Specialist, Baylor University Medical Center, 3500 Gaston Ave, Dallas, TX 75246 Omar O. Hernandez is ECMO Specialist, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.
    Mortality of patients awaiting lung transplant remains a significant problem as the number of patients on the waiting list far surpasses the number of donor organs available. Interest in the use of "awake" extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to lung transplant has emerged because this strategy offers several benefits over mechanical ventilation. This article provides a review of relevant literature and discusses indications and complications of awake ECMO therapy, cannulation strategies, and nursing considerations for this patient population. Read More

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