45 results match your criteria 3D printing in medicine[Journal]

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MRI-driven design of customised 3D printed gynaecological brachytherapy applicators with curved needle channels.

3D Print Med 2019 May 16;5(1). Epub 2019 May 16.

BioMechanical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.

Background: Brachytherapy involves placement of radioactive sources inside or near the tumour. For gynaecological cancer, recent developments, including 3D imaging and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy, have improved treatment quality and outcomes. However, for large or complex tumours, target coverage and local control with commercially available applicators remain suboptimal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-019-0047-xDOI Listing

Assessment of body-powered 3D printed partial finger prostheses: a case study.

3D Print Med 2019 May 2;5(1). Epub 2019 May 2.

Department of Biomechanics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 6001 Dodge Street Omaha, Nebraska, NE, 68182, USA.

Background: Traditional prosthetic fabrication relies heavily on plaster casting and 3D models for the accurate production of prosthetics to allow patients to begin rehabilitation and participate in daily activities. Recent technological advancements allow for the use of 2D photographs to fabricate individualized prosthetics based on patient anthropometrics. Additive manufacturing (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-019-0044-0DOI Listing

Methods for verification of 3D printed anatomic model accuracy using cardiac models as an example.

3D Print Med 2019 Mar 29;5(1). Epub 2019 Mar 29.

VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA, USA.

Background: Medical 3D printing has brought the manufacturing world closer to the patient's bedside than ever before. This requires hospitals and their personnel to update their quality assurance program to more appropriately accommodate the 3D printing fabrication process and the challenges that come along with it.

Results: In this paper, we explored different methods for verifying the accuracy of a 3D printed anatomical model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-019-0043-1DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Analysis of biomechanical behavior of 3D printed mandibular graft with porous scaffold structure designed by topological optimization.

3D Print Med 2019 Mar 14;5(1). Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA.

Background: Our long-term goal is to design and manufacture a customized graft with porous scaffold structure for repairing large mandibular defects using topological optimization and 3D printing technology. The purpose of this study is to characterize the mechanical behavior of 3D printed anisotropic scaffolds as bone analogs by fused deposition modeling (FDM).

Methods: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were used to reconstruct a 3D mandible and finite element models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-019-0042-2DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Patient-specific 3D printed and augmented reality kidney and prostate cancer models: impact on patient education.

3D Print Med 2019 Feb 19;5(1). Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Center for Advanced Imaging Innovation and Research (CAI2R) and Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Health, NYU School of Medicine, 660 First Avenue, Fourth Floor, New York, NY, 10016, USA.

Background: Patient-specific 3D models are being used increasingly in medicine for many applications including surgical planning, procedure rehearsal, trainee education, and patient education. To date, experiences on the use of 3D models to facilitate patient understanding of their disease and surgical plan are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate in the context of renal and prostate cancer the impact of using 3D printed and augmented reality models for patient education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-019-0041-3DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Dose calibration of Gafchromic EBT3 film for Ir-192 brachytherapy source using 3D-printed PLA and ABS plastics.

3D Print Med 2019 Feb 6;5(1). Epub 2019 Feb 6.

University of Minnesota Medical School, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA.

3D printing technology has allowed the creation of custom applicators for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, especially for complex anatomy. With conformal therapy comes the need for advanced dosimetric verification. It is important to demonstrate how dose to 3D printed materials can be related to dose to water. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-019-0040-4DOI Listing
February 2019

Low cost additive manufacturing of microneedle masters.

3D Print Med 2019 Feb 4;5(1). Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Merck & Co., Inc, Kenilworth, NJ, USA.

Purpose: Microneedle patches are arrays of tiny needles that painlessly pierce the skin to deliver medication into the body. Biocompatible microneedles are usually fabricated via molding of a master structure. Microfabrication techniques used for fabricating these master structures are costly, time intensive, and require extensive expertise to control the structure's geometry of the structure, despite evidence that microneedle geometry is a key design parameter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-019-0039-xDOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

Utility of virtual monoenergetic images from spectral detector computed tomography in improving image segmentation for purposes of 3D printing and modeling.

3D Print Med 2019 Jan 18;5(1). Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center/Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA.

Background: One of the key steps in generating three-dimensional (3D) printed models in medicine is segmentation of radiologic imaging. The software tools used for segmentation may be automated, semi-automated, or manual which rely on differences in material density, attenuation characteristics, and/or advanced software algorithms. Spectral Detector Computed Tomography (SDCT) is a form of dual energy computed tomography that works at the detector level to generate virtual monoenergetic images (VMI) at different energies/ kilo-electron volts (keV). Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-019-0038-yDOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 3D printing Special Interest Group (SIG): guidelines for medical 3D printing and appropriateness for clinical scenarios.

3D Print Med 2018 Nov 21;4(1):11. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Department of Radiology and The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Medical three-dimensional (3D) printing has expanded dramatically over the past three decades with growth in both facility adoption and the variety of medical applications. Consideration for each step required to create accurate 3D printed models from medical imaging data impacts patient care and management. In this paper, a writing group representing the Radiological Society of North America Special Interest Group on 3D Printing (SIG) provides recommendations that have been vetted and voted on by the SIG active membership. Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0030-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6251945PMC
November 2018
8 Reads

3D printing of surgical hernia meshes impregnated with contrast agents: in vitro proof of concept with imaging characteristics on computed tomography.

3D Print Med 2018 Dec 7;4(1):13. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 S. Kingshighway Blvd, Campus Box 8131, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.

Background: Selected medical implants and other 3D printed constructs could potentially benefit from the ability to incorporate contrast agents into their structure. The purpose of the present study is to create 3D printed surgical meshes impregnated with iodinated, gadolinium, and barium contrast agents and characterize their computed tomography (CT) imaging characteristics. Commercial fused deposition layering 3D printing was used to construct surgical meshes impregnated with imaging contrast agents in an in vitro model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0037-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6283811PMC
December 2018
4 Reads

Exploration of time sequential, patient specific 3D heart unlocks clinical understanding.

3D Print Med 2018 Dec 6;4(1):15. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

University of Illinois College of Medicine, 1 Illini Drive, Peoria, IL, 61605, USA.

Objectives: The purpose was to create a time sequential three-dimensional virtual reality model, also referred to as a four-dimensional model, to explore its possible benefit and clinical applications. We hypothesized that this novel solution allows for the visuospatial benefits of the 3D model and the dynamic benefits of other existing imaging modalities.

Background: We have seen how 3D models hold great value in medical decision making by eliminating the variable visuospatial skills of practitioners. Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0034-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6283805PMC
December 2018
13 Reads

Efficacy of using a 3D printed lumbosacral spine phantom in improving trainee proficiency and confidence in CT-guided spine procedures.

3D Print Med 2018 Oct 10;4(1). Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, M-391, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0628, USA.

Background: Minimally-invasive spine procedures provide targeted, individualized diagnosis and pain management for patients. Competence in these procedures is acquired through experience and training. We created a 3D printed model of a degenerative lumbosacral spine with scoliosis and spondylosis, using materials that mimic bone and soft tissue density under CT. Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0031-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6179970PMC
October 2018
17 Reads

3D printing for congenital heart disease: a single site's initial three-yearexperience.

3D Print Med 2018 Nov 8;4(1):10. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

Background: 3D printing is an ideal manufacturing process for creating patient-matched models (anatomical models) for surgical and interventional planning. Cardiac anatomical models have been described in numerous case studies and journal publications. However, few studies attempt to describe wider impact of the novel planning augmentation tool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0033-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223396PMC
November 2018

Material characterization and selection for 3D-printed spine models.

3D Print Med 2018 Oct 19;4(1). Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Carnegie Mellon University, Carnegie Institute of Technology, CERLAB, 3000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA.

The two most popular models used in anatomical training for residents, clinicians, or surgeons are cadavers and sawbones. The former is extremely costly and difficult to attain due to cost, ethical implications, and availability, while the latter is said to not have the same tactile fidelity or mechanical properties as human bone. This study examined the potential use of 3D-printed phantoms to emulate cadaveric, human vertebrae, in hopes of acting as a future use over cadavers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0032-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195498PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

High-throughput scaffold-free microtissues through 3D printing.

3D Print Med 2018 Nov 22;4(1). Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

Background: Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures and 3D bioprinting have recently gained attention based on their multiple advantages over two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have less translational potential to recapitulate human physiology. 3D scaffold supports, cell aggregate systems and hydrogels have been shown to accurately mimic native tissues and support more relevant cell-cell interactions for studying effects of drugs and bioactive agents on cells in 3D. The development of cost-effective, high-throughput and scaffold-free microtissue assays remains challenging. Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0029-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6197341PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Using 3D models in orthopedic oncology: presenting personalized advantages in surgical planning and intraoperative outcomes.

3D Print Med 2018 Nov 26;4(1):12. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Orthopaedics, Phramongkutklao Hospital and College of Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Three Dimensional (3D) printed models can aid in effective pre-operative planning by defining the geometry of tumor mass, bone loss, and nearby vessels to help determine the most accurate osteotomy site and the most appropriate prosthesis, especially in the case of complex acetabular deficiency, resulting in decreased operative time and decreased blood loss.

Methods: Four complicated cases were selected, reconstructed and printed. These 4 cases were divided in 3 groups of 3D printed models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0035-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6261090PMC
November 2018

Utilizing a low-cost desktop 3D printer to develop a "one-stop 3D printing lab" for oral and maxillofacial surgery and dentistry fields.

3D Print Med 2018 Dec 13;4(1). Epub 2018 Aug 13.

4Department of Endodontics, Tokyo Dental College, 1-2-2 Masago, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8502 Japan.

Background: In the oral and maxillofacial surgery and dentistry fields, the use of three-dimensional (3D) patient-specific organ models is increasing, which has increased the cost of obtaining them. We developed an environment in our facility in which we can design, fabricate, and use 3D models called the "One-stop 3D printing lab". The lab made it possible to quickly and inexpensively produce the 3D models that are indispensable for oral and maxillofacial surgery. Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0028-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6097791PMC
December 2018
11 Reads

Rapid customization system for 3D-printed splint using programmable modeling technique - a practical approach.

3D Print Med 2018 25;4(1). Epub 2018 May 25.

Graduate School of Governance and Media, Keio University, 5322 Endo, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 252-0882 Japan.

Background: Traditional splinting processes are skill dependent and irreversible, and patient satisfaction levels during rehabilitation are invariably lowered by the heavy structure and poor ventilation of splints. To overcome this drawback, use of the 3D-printing technology has been proposed in recent years, and there has been an increase in public awareness. However, application of 3D-printing technologies is limited by the low CAD proficiency of clinicians as well as unforeseen scan flaws within anatomic models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0027-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5970151PMC

Patient-specific neurosurgical phantom: assessment of visual quality, accuracy, and scaling effects.

3D Print Med 2018 13;4(1). Epub 2018 Mar 13.

1Department of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy, Science and Letters at Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, Monte Alegre, Ribeirão Preto, SP CEP 14040-901 Brazil.

Background: Training in medical education depends on the availability of standardized materials that can reliably mimic the human anatomy and physiology. One alternative to using cadavers or animal bodies is to employ phantoms or mimicking devices. Styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) gels are biologically inert and present tunable properties, including mechanical properties that resemble the soft tissue. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0025-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954795PMC
March 2018
3 Reads

Feasibility study applying a parametric model as the design generator for 3D-printed orthosis for fracture immobilization.

3D Print Med 2018 11;4(1). Epub 2018 Jan 11.

GGraduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, 5322 Endo, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 252-0882 Japan.

Background: Applying 3D printing technology for the fabrication of custom-made orthoses provides significant advantages, including increased ventilation and lighter weights. Currently, the design of such orthoses is most often performed in the CAD environment, but creating the orthosis model is a time-consuming process that requires significant CAD experience. This skill gap limits clinicians from applying this technology in fracture treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0024-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954794PMC
January 2018
12 Reads

On the optimization of low-cost FDM 3D printers for accurate replication of patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm geometry.

3D Print Med 2018 17;4(1). Epub 2018 Jan 17.

1The School of Engineering, Institute for Materials and Processes, The University of Edinburgh, Robert Stevenson Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FB UK.

Background: There is a potential for direct model manufacturing of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) using 3D printing technique for generating flexible semi-transparent prototypes. A patient-specific AAA model was manufactured using fused deposition modelling (FDM) 3D printing technology. A flexible, semi-transparent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), called Cheetah Water (produced by Ninjatek, USA), was used as the flexible, transparent material for model manufacture with a hydrophilic support structure 3D printed with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0023-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954792PMC
January 2018
11 Reads

Low-cost customized cranioplasty using a 3D digital printing model: a case report.

3D Print Med 2018 12;4(1). Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon, Plastic Surgery Institute, Mexico City, Mexico.

Background: Cranial defects usually occur after trauma, neurosurgical procedures like decompressive craniotomy, tumour resections, infection and congenital defects. The purpose of cranial vault repair is to protect the underlying brain tissue, to reduce any localized pain and patient anxiety, and improve cranial aesthetics. Cranioplasty is a frequent neurosurgical procedure achieved with the aid of cranial prosthesis made from materials such as: titanium, autologous bone, ceramics and polymers. Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-018-0026-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954791PMC
April 2018
21 Reads

Implementation of iterative metal artifact reduction in the pre-planning-procedure of three-dimensional physical modeling.

3D Print Med 2017 31;3(1). Epub 2017 Mar 31.

1Department of Radiology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.

Background: To assess the impact of metal artifact reduction techniques in 3D printing by evaluating image quality and segmentation time in both phantom and patient studies with dental restorations and/or other metal implants. An acrylic denture apparatus (Kilgore Typodent, Kilgore International, Coldwater, MI) was set in a 20 cm water phantom and scanned on a single-source CT scanner with gantry tilting capacity (SOMATOM Edge, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) under 5 scenerios: (1) Baseline acquisition at 120 kV with no gantry tilt, no jaw spacer, (2) acquisition at 140 kV, (3) acquisition with a gantry tilt at 15°, (4) acquisition with a non-radiopaque jaw spacer and (5) acquisition with a jaw spacer and a gantry tilt at 15°. All acquisitions were reconstructed both with and without a dedicated iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm (MAR). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0013-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036666PMC
March 2017
6 Reads

Medical 3D printing: methods to standardize terminology and report trends.

3D Print Med 2017 17;3(1). Epub 2017 Mar 17.

1Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa, 501 Smyth Road, Box 232, K1H 8L6 Ottawa, ON Canada.

Background: Medical 3D printing is expanding exponentially, with tremendous potential yet to be realized in nearly all facets of medicine. Unfortunately, multiple informal subdomain-specific isolated terminological 'silos' where disparate terminology is used for similar concepts are also arising as rapidly. It is imperative to formalize the foundational terminology at this early stage to facilitate future knowledge integration, collaborative research, and appropriate reimbursement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0012-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036766PMC

Accelerated workflow for primary jaw reconstruction with microvascular fibula graft.

3D Print Med 2017 14;3(1). Epub 2017 Feb 14.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Mainz, Medical Center, Augustusplatz 2, D-55131 Mainz, Rheinland-Pfalz Germany.

Introduction: Major facial defects due to cancer or deformities can be reconstructed through microvascular osteocutaneous flaps. Hereby CAD/CAM workflows offer a possibility to optimize reconstruct and reduce surgical time. We present a retrospectiv observational study regarding the developement of an in-house workflow allowing an accelerated CAD/CAM fibula reconstruction without outsourcing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0010-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036765PMC
February 2017
3 Reads

Fabrication approaches for the creation of physical models from microscopy data.

3D Print Med 2017 14;3(1). Epub 2017 Feb 14.

1Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Ave, Madison, WI 53705 USA.

Background: Three-dimensional (3D) printing has become a useful method of fabrication for many clinical applications. It is also a technique that is becoming increasingly accessible, as the price of the necessary tools and supplies decline. One emerging, and unreported, application for 3D printing is to aid in the visualization of 3D imaging data by creating physical models of select structures of interest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0011-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036764PMC
February 2017
1 Read

Maintaining safety and efficacy for 3D printing in medicine.

3D Print Med 2017 26;3(1). Epub 2017 Jan 26.

2Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L6 Canada.

Background: The increased and accelerating utilization of 3D printing in medicine opens up questions regarding safety and efficacy in the use of medical models. The authors recognize an important shift towards point-of-care manufacturing for medical models in a hospital environment. This change, and the role of the radiologist as a central facilitator of these services, opens discussion about topics ranging from clinical uses to patient safety to regulatory implications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-016-0009-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036763PMC
January 2017

Preoperative planning and tracheal stent design in thoracic surgery: a primer for the 2017 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) hands-on course in 3D printing.

3D Print Med 2017 6;3(1):14. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

1Department of Medical Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa School of Medicine, Ottawa, ON Canada.

In this work, we provide specific clinical examples to demonstrate basic practical techniques involved in image segmentation, computer-aided design, and 3D printing. A step-by-step approach using United States Food and Drug Administration cleared software is provided to enhance surgical intervention in a patient with a complex superior sulcus tumor. Furthermore, patient-specific device creation is demonstrated using dedicated computer-aided design software. Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0022-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954793PMC
December 2017
8 Reads

Creating three dimensional models of Alzheimer's disease.

3D Print Med 2017 21;3(1):13. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

1Departments of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.

Background: Alzheimer's disease prevalence will reach epidemic proportions in coming decades. There is a need for impactful educational materials to help patients, families, medical practitioners, and policy makers understand the nature and impact of the disease. Defining an effective workflow to create such models from existing segmentation tools will be a valuable contribution in creating these patient-specific models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0020-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954790PMC
November 2017
1 Read

Anatomic modeling using 3D printing: quality assurance and optimization.

3D Print Med 2017 26;3(1). Epub 2017 Apr 26.

1Department of Radiology, 200 First Street SW, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, 55901 MN USA.

Background: The purpose of this study is to provide a framework for the development of a quality assurance (QA) program for use in medical 3D printing applications. An interdisciplinary QA team was built with expertise from all aspects of 3D printing. A systematic QA approach was established to assess the accuracy and precision of each step during the 3D printing process, including: image data acquisition, segmentation and processing, and 3D printing and cleaning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0014-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954797PMC
April 2017
2 Reads

Using computed tomography and 3D printing to construct custom prosthetics attachments and devices.

3D Print Med 2017 22;3(1). Epub 2017 Aug 22.

1Department of Radiology, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD USA.

Background: The prosthetic devices the military uses to restore function and mobility to our wounded warriors are highly advanced, and in many instances not publically available. There is considerable research aimed at this population of young patients who are extremely active and desire to take part in numerous complex activities. While prosthetists design and manufacture numerous devices with standard materials and limb assemblies, patients often require individualized prosthetic design and/or modifications to enable them to participate fully in complex activities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0016-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954798PMC
August 2017
1 Read

Development of a 3D printed device to support long term intestinal culture as an alternative to hyperoxic chamber methods.

3D Print Med 2017 20;3(1). Epub 2017 Sep 20.

2Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 52 Campus drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4 Canada.

Background: Most interactions between pathogenic microorganisms and their target host occur on mucosal surfaces of internal organs such as the intestine. In vitro organ culture (IVOC) provides an unique tool for studying host-pathogen interactions in a controlled environment. However, this technique requires a complex laboratory setup and specialized apparatus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0018-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954799PMC
September 2017
2 Reads

Surgical reconstruction of the ossicular chain with custom 3D printed ossicular prosthesis.

3D Print Med 2017 27;3(1). Epub 2017 Jul 27.

2Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA.

Background: Conductive hearing loss due to ossicular abnormalities occurs from many causes, including trauma, infection, cholesteatoma, surgery and congenital anomalies. Surgical reconstruction of the ossicular chain is a well-established procedure for repair of ossicular defects, but is still plagued by high failure rates. Underlying disease and proper sizing of prostheses are two challenges that lead to component failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0015-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954796PMC

Application of 3D-printed and patient-specific cast for the treatment of distal radius fractures: initial experience.

3D Print Med 2017 9;3(1):11. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Research Center for Medical Image Computing, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT Hong Kong.

Background: Distal radius fracture is common in the general population. Fracture management includes a plaster cast, splint and synthetic material cast to immobilise the injured arm. Casting complications are common in those conventional casting technologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0019-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954789PMC
November 2017
6 Reads

Design and fabrication of a 3D-printed oral stent for head and neck radiotherapy from routine diagnostic imaging.

3D Print Med 2017 16;3(1):12. Epub 2017 Nov 16.

2Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1220 Holcombe Blvd, MS97, Houston, TX 77030 USA.

Background: Oral stents have been shown to reduce the deleterious effects of head and neck radiotherapy through the displacement of normal tissues away from the areas of high dose irradiation. While these stents are commonly used in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer at many large academic cancer centers, their use is much more limited outside of these institutions due to the time and expertise required for their fabrication.

Results: In the study, we describe a novel method to design and manufacture oral stents from routine computed tomography (CT) imaging studies through the use of 3D printing technologies. Read More

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https://threedmedprint.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0021-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954788PMC
November 2017
14 Reads

3D-printed phantom study for investigating stent abutment during gastroduodenal stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction.

3D Print Med 2017 25;3(1):10. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

4Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap 2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Background: Placing a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) is safe and effective for the palliative treatment of malignant gastroduodenal (GD) strictures. SEMS abutment in the duodenal wall is associated with increased food impaction, resulting in higher stent malfunction and shorter stent patency. The desire to evaluate the mechanism and significance of stent abutment led us to design an in vitro experiment using a flexible anthropomorphic three-dimensional (3D)-printed GD phantom model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-017-0017-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954787PMC
September 2017
5 Reads

Additively manufactured medical products - the FDA perspective.

3D Print Med 2016 18;2. Epub 2016 May 18.

US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research,Silver Spring, MD 20993, USA.

Additive manufacturing/3D printing of medical devices is becoming more commonplace, a 3D printed drug is now commercially available, and bioprinting is poised to transition from laboratory to market. Despite the variety of technologies enabling these products, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is charged with protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring these products are safe and effective. To that end, we are presenting the FDA's current perspective on additive manufacturing/3D printing of medical products ranging from those regulated by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), and the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6027614PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-016-0005-9DOI Listing
May 2016
1 Read

Medical 3D printing for vascular interventions and surgical oncology: a primer for the 2016 radiological society of North America (RSNA) hands-on course in 3D printing.

3D Print Med 2015 25;2(1). Epub 2016 Nov 25.

The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa, 501 Smyth Road, Box 232, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 Canada.

Medical 3D printing holds the potential of transforming personalized medicine by enabling the fabrication of patient-specific implants, reimagining prostheses, developing surgical guides to expedite and transform surgical interventions, and enabling a growing multitude of specialized applications. In order to realize this tremendous potential in frontline medicine, an understanding of the basic principles of 3D printing by the medical professionals is required. This primer underlines the basic approaches and tools in 3D printing, starting from patient anatomy acquired through cross-sectional imaging, in this case Computed Tomography (CT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-016-0008-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036767PMC
November 2016

A rapid and intelligent designing technique for patient-specific and 3D-printed orthopedic cast.

3D Print Med 2015 22;2(1). Epub 2016 Sep 22.

Research Center for Medical Image Computing, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT Hong Kong.

Background: Two point four out of 100 people suffer from one or more fractures in the course of average lifetimes. Traditional casts are featured as cumbersome structures that result in high risk of cutaneous complications. Clinical demands for developing a hygienic cast have gotten more and more attention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-016-0007-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036601PMC
September 2016
2 Reads

3D printing in medicine of congenital heart diseases.

3D Print Med 2015 13;2(1). Epub 2016 Sep 13.

Division of Cardiovascular Surgery - Department of Surgery, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G1X8 Canada.

Congenital heart diseases causing significant hemodynamic and functional consequences require surgical repair. Understanding of the precise surgical anatomy is often challenging and can be inadequate or wrong. Modern high resolution imaging techniques and 3D printing technology allow 3D printing of the replicas of the patient's heart for precise understanding of the complex anatomy, hands-on simulation of surgical and interventional procedures, and morphology teaching of the medical professionals and patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-016-0004-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036784PMC
September 2016
9 Reads

3D Printed replica of articular fractures for surgical planning and patient consent: a two years multi-centric experience.

3D Print Med 2015 1;2(1). Epub 2016 Sep 1.

Orthopedic Deparment, University Hospital of Verona, Piazzale Stefani 1, Verona, Italy.

Background: CT scanning with 3D reconstructed images are currently used to study articular fractures in orthopedic and trauma surgery. A 3D-Printer creates solid objects, starting from a 3D Computer representation.

Case Description: We report from two year of multicenter experience in 3D printing of articular fractures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-016-0006-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036663PMC
September 2016
1 Read

3D printed ventricular septal defect patch: a primer for the 2015 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) hands-on course in 3D printing.

3D Print Med 2015 27;1(1). Epub 2015 Nov 27.

The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON Canada.

Hand-held three dimensional models of the human anatomy and pathology, tailored-made protheses, and custom-designed implants can be derived from imaging modalities, most commonly Computed Tomography (CT). However, standard DICOM format images cannot be 3D printed; instead, additional image post-processing is required to transform the anatomy of interest into Standard Tessellation Language (STL) format is needed. This conversion, and the subsequent 3D printing of the STL file, requires a series of steps. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-015-0002-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036609PMC
November 2015

The residual STL volume as a metric to evaluate accuracy and reproducibility of anatomic models for 3D printing: application in the validation of 3D-printable models of maxillofacial bone from reduced radiation dose CT images.

3D Print Med 2015 27;1(1). Epub 2015 Nov 27.

Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA USA.

Background: The effects of reduced radiation dose CT for the generation of maxillofacial bone STL models for 3D printing is currently unknown. Images of two full-face transplantation patients scanned with non-contrast 320-detector row CT were reconstructed at fractions of the acquisition radiation dose using noise simulation software and both filtered back-projection (FBP) and Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D (AIDR3D). The maxillofacial bone STL model segmented with thresholding from AIDR3D images at 100 % dose was considered the reference. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-015-0003-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036610PMC
November 2015
4 Reads

3D Printing in Medicine: an introductory message from the Editor-in-Chief.

Authors:
Frank J Rybicki

3D Print Med 2015 27;1(1). Epub 2015 Nov 27.

The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the Department of Radiology, the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, 735 Parkdale Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4E9 Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41205-015-0001-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036611PMC
November 2015
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