145 results match your criteria 20 century British history[Journal]


The Limits of Power: Wind Energy, Orkney, and the Post-war British State.

Authors:
Marianna Dudley

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Aug 3. Epub 2019 Aug 3.

University of Bristol.

This article identifies the environmental components of the limits of industrial nationalization between 1945 and 1956, and with it the spatial dimensions of state power, through a case study of wind power experiments on the Orkney islands. Technocratic and socialist principles drove efforts to supply electricity to all corners of the nation, but material and environmental factors limited success, especially in remote regions. The article considers the materiality of islandness and its effects on the application of national-scale energy policy and emergence of 'alternative' energy solutions, in light of James C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz024DOI Listing

Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture 2018The Women's Suffrage Movement in the Balfour Family.

Authors:
Susan Pedersen

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Sep;30(3):299-320

Given on the centenary of women's suffrage, this lecture explores the tensions and conflicts the claim for the vote raised among elite women already enmeshed in parliamentary and political circles. Drawing on the unbuttoned and sometimes angry correspondence among A.J. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz010DOI Listing
September 2019
1 Read

The 'Rainbow Alliance' or the Focus Group? Sexuality and Race in the Labour Party's Electoral Strategy, 1985-7.

Authors:
C Murphy

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jul 5. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Queen Mary University of London.

In the 1980s, Labour struggled to respond to a hostile political context during a protracted period of opposition. Diverse figures claimed that the Left was suffering from a structural decline in a supposed 'traditional working class' voting base: contentions which only became more influential after the 1983 electoral catastrophe. Competing solutions were proffered-including building a 'rainbow alliance' informed by equalities politics, or appealing to a southern 'new working class'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz015DOI Listing
July 2019
2 Reads

'Race', Black Majority Churches, and the Rise of Ecumenical Multiculturalism in the 1970s.

Authors:
John Maiden

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jul 3. Epub 2019 Jul 3.

The Open University, UK.

At the beginning of the 1970s, relations between the historic British churches and the new black-led churches were usually non-existent or marked by prejudices or ambivalences. This article examines the emergence, development, and significance of a cross-cultural ecumenical dialogue sponsored by the British Council of Churches. It places this in a context of both growing white liberal interest in the 'multi-racial' society and the increasing public assertiveness of collective black Christian consciousness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz016DOI Listing

'Action Not Words': The Conservative Party, Public Opinion and 'Scientific' Politics, c.1945-70.

Authors:
Charles Lockwood

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jun 24. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

University of Cambridge.

From the late 1950s, Conservative research and policy thinkers underwent a conscious intellectual adjustment, which had profound implications for how the party conceived the relationship between politicians and the public during Edward Heath's period as Conservative leader after 1965. In response to contemporaneous debates regarding 'modernization', and as a result of their engagement with the emergent social sciences, a new generation of Conservatives tended to repudiate the party's traditional preference for idealist and organicist philosophical assumptions in favour of a rationalistic approach to political administration. Their preoccupation with economic management was concomitant of their loss of faith in the formative role of rhetorical and moral appeals in shaping public opinion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz014DOI Listing
June 2019
5 Reads

The Trial of Convoy PQ17 and the Royal Navy in Post-War British Cultural Memory.

Authors:
Frances Houghton

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jun 23. Epub 2019 Jun 23.

Modern British History at the University of Manchester.

This article explores the 1970 case of Broome v. Cassell & Co. in which an elderly wartime naval officer was awarded unprecedented damages for defamation in David Irving's account of the sinking of wartime Allied convoy PQ17 in 1942. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz013DOI Listing
June 2019
24 Reads

TCBH Duncan Tanner Essay Prize Winner 2018 Financing the Information Age: London TeleCity, the Legacy of IT-82, and the Selling of British Telecom.

Authors:
Jacob Ward

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Sep;30(3):424-446

University of Oxford.

This article is a history of the privatization of British Telecom. BT's privatization occupies a central position in histories of Thatcherism as a pivotal moment in Thatcherism's ideological focus on popular capitalism. These histories, however, overlook the important intersection of financial institutions and information technology policy in shaping BT's privatization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz012DOI Listing
September 2019
7 Reads

Feminism and the Politics of Prostitution in King's Cross in the 1980s.

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jun;30(2):231-263

Johns Hopkins University.

In the 1980s, prostitution resurfaced as the object of feminist politics as second-wave activists grappled with Thatcherism, prostitute rights, tenant activism, anti-violence movements, and changes in the street sex trade and in policing. These conflicting imperatives converged on King's Cross, London. Events in King's Cross highlight some general trends, especially shifts in policing and in the geographic dispersal of the street sex trade. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz011DOI Listing
June 2019
3 Reads

'You Can't Dismiss that as Being Less Happy, You See it is Different'. Sexual Counselling in 1950s England.

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Sep;30(3):375-398

Cambridge University and St John's College.

This article uses the audio recordings of sexual counselling sessions carried out by Dr Joan Malleson, a birth control activist and committed family planning doctor in the early 1950s, which are held at the Wellcome Library in London as a case study to explore the ways Malleson and the patients mobilised emotions for respectively managing sexual problems and expressing what they understood as constituting a 'good sexuality' in postwar Britain. The article contains two interrelated arguments. First, it argues that Malleson used a psychological framework to inform her clinical work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz008DOI Listing
September 2019
9 Reads

Erratum.

Authors:

20 Century Br Hist 2019 06;30(2):297

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz009DOI Listing
June 2019
2 Reads

Deindustrialization, the Linwood Car Plant and Scotland's Political Divergence from England in the 1960s and 1970s.

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Sep;30(3):399-423

University of Glasgow.

Scotland's political divergence from England is a key theme in late twentieth century British history. Typically seen in terms of the post-1979 Thatcher effect, this in fact developed over a longer timeframe, rooted in industrial changes revealed by analysis of the Linwood car plant in Renfrewshire. Conservatism and Unionism was an eminent political force in Scotland in the 1940s and 1950s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz005DOI Listing
September 2019
2 Reads

Toffee Men, Travelling Drapers and Black-Market Perfumers-South Asian Networks of Petty Trade in Early Twentieth Century Britain.

Authors:
David Holland

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jun;30(2):145-173

University of Sheffield.

Selling small wares, novelties, and affordable luxuries manufactured from artificial silk, the South Asian door-to-door pedlar or 'travelling draper', and his compatriot the 'Indian toffee man', were once fairly commonplace figures in British working-class life and the object of fond childhood recollections for many. Unfortunately, they have now largely drifted from popular memory, having left little trace in the historical record. However, this article's reconstruction of their lives offers a new perspective on the pivotal role inter-racial social networks played in pioneering South Asian immigration, settlement, and trade in Britain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz003DOI Listing
June 2019
3 Reads

A 'Radical Project': Youth Culture, Leisure, and Politics in 1980s Sheffield.

Authors:
Sarah Kenny

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Mar 11. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Department of History, University of Birmingham.

The Leadmill, a cooperative arts centre and nightclub in Sheffield, opened in 1980. The venue sought to provide an accessible leisure space for the economically and socially marginalized, and received funding for this from Sheffield City Council. Focusing on the cultural policies of the new urban left Labour Council in Sheffield during the 1980s, this article explores the relationship between Sheffield City Council and the Leadmill. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz006DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Socialist Television Drama, Newspaper Critics and the Battle of Ideas During the Crisis of Britain's Post-War Settlement.

Authors:
Steven Fielding

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Mar 11. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

School of Politics and International Relations, University of Nottingham, UK.

Due to the difficult methodological issues it presents, political historians are wary of using television - the most important mass medium of the later twentieth century - as a means of exploring vernacular political thinking. Attempting to show how television audiences were encouraged to think politically, the article outlines a method generated through an engagement with the work of disciplines beyond history, to help political historians more systematically assess the medium's popular impact. The article takes as its case study Britain during the 1970s, one of the most ideologically contested periods in the country's history. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwz004DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

'Secret Lists and Sanctions': The Blacklisting of the John Lewis Partnership and the Politics of Pay in 1970s Britain.

Authors:
Alix R Green

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jun;30(2):205-230

University of Essex, UK.

In 1977, the John Lewis Partnership (JLP) was blacklisted for breaching the Labour government's pay controls under the Social Contract. As the Callaghan administration struggled to establish economic credibility, extending its reach into the private sector emerged as a political priority. JLP became a test case of government resolve months before the Ford strike of autumn 1978 that ushered in the Winter of Discontent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy056DOI Listing
June 2019
4 Reads

First Aid and Voluntarism in England, 1945-85.

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Feb 3. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

University of Hull, UK.

First aid was the focus of growing voluntary activity in the post-war decades. Despite the advent of the National Health Service in 1948, increased numbers of people volunteered to learn, teach, and administer first aid as concern about health and safety infiltrated new activities and arenas. In this article we use the example of the Voluntary Aid Societies (VAS, focusing in particular on St John Ambulance) to highlight continuities and change in the relationship between state and voluntary sector in health and welfare provision during the four decades after 1945. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy043DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Counterculture, Local Authorities and British Christianity at the Windsor and Watchfield Free Festivals (1972-5).

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

University of Chichester, UK.

Four free pop festivals, held in Windsor and Watchfield in 1972-75, attracted significant public attention. This article discusses the aims and ideals of the festivalgoers, the confused reactions of the authorities, the ambivalence of the Anglican Church and the hostility of some conservative groups. We argue that the free festivals mark an important stage in the constitution of the counterculture and that they created a model which later pop festivals (in particular Glastonbury) attempt to emulate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy053DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Harold Wilson's 'Lavender List' Scandal and the Shifting Moral Economy of Honour.

Authors:
Tobias Harper

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Dec 22. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Arizona State University.

Harold Wilson's resignation honours list of 1976 was almost universally condemned by politicians, civil servants, and the press because it contained a number of high honours to individuals who were seen as scandalously lacking in merit. Unknown officials leaked details to the press and used multiple internal mechanisms, including the Political Honours Scrutiny Committee, to try to block the list, but Wilson pushed it through. This article examines the controversy around the list in terms of how the various parties involved used ideas about scandal, honour, and merit to discredit Wilson, his secretary Marcia Falkender and the honours nominees. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy048DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

"The British Soldier is no Bolshevik": The British Army, Discipline, and the Demobilization Strikes of 1919.

Authors:
William Butler

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Sep;30(3):321-346

University of Kent, UK.

This article considers the breakdown in discipline in the British Army which occurred in Britain and on the Western Front during the process of demobilization at the end of the First World War. Many soldiers, retained in the army immediately after the Armistice, went on strike, and some formed elected committees, demanding their swifter return to civilian life. Their perception was that the existing demobilization system was unjust, and men were soon organized by those more politically conscious members of the armed forces who had enlisted for the duration of the war. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy044DOI Listing
September 2019
2 Reads

Labour Activism and the Political Self in Inter-War Working-Class Women's Politics.

Authors:
Stephanie Ward

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Mar;30(1):29-52

Cardiff University, UK.

This article explores working-class women's experiences of political activism in the Labour Party in the 1930s. The article focuses upon the relationships formed with leaders, the bonds with fellow women, and the emotional fulfilment politics could bring, rather than considering the policies and campaigns which drew women into the party. It suggests how working-class women performed a political self which was shaped by but distinctive from a domestic self. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy047DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

A 'Mixture of Britannia and Boadicea': Dorothy Crisp's Conservatism and the Limits of Right-Wing Women's Political Activism, 1927-48.

Authors:
Gary Love

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Jun;30(2):174-204

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.

Dorothy Crisp is known for being the militant Chairman of the British Housewives League (BHL) after the Second World War, but historians have failed to recognize that her views and actions were the culmination of over twenty years of right-wing journalism and political activism through which she tried to influence the Conservative Party. This article re-evaluates Crisp's Conservatism and her political career. It asks why such a powerful pro-Conservative female activist failed to secure a place within Conservative politics during the 1930s and the 1940s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy042DOI Listing
June 2019
9 Reads

Family Politics: Campaigning for Child Benefits in the 1980s.

Authors:
Ruth Davidson

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Nov 9. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Child benefit was seen by some to encourage the sort of welfare dependency that the moralistic individualism of Thatcherism opposed. Yet, surprisingly, the benefit survived the Thatcher years. Its survival reveals the conundrum the Conservative party have had regarding benefits for the family and family policy more broadly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy035DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Splinters: Cross-Dressing Ex-Servicemen on the Interwar Stage.

Authors:
Jacob Bloomfield

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Mar;30(1):1-28

The University of Manchester.

This article will examine how a series of theatrical shows which starred casts of cross-dressing ex-servicemen achieved critical and commercial popularity in interwar Britain despite increased cultural anxieties about the links between gender variance and transgressive acts, behaviours, and categories of identity. Prior to this study, historians have researched wartime concert parties where servicemen cross-dressed for each other's entertainment, but scant attention has been given to the popular phenomenon of ex-servicemen who performed cross-dressing revues for the general public. Staging revues on the home front exposed cross-dressing ex-servicemen to new forms of spectatorship: the theatregoing public, arts criticism in the press, and state censorship. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy037DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Corrigendum.

Authors:

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Oct 5. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy036DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

King Caz: Cazenove, Thatcherism, and the 1980s financial revolution.

Authors:
Emma Barrett

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Mar;30(1):108-131

University of Birmingham, UK.

This article shows how elite stockbrokers Cazenove and Co. responded to the 'Big Bang' deregulation of the financial sector in 1986, using social networks and inherited practices to navigate an ostensibly technical and modernizing revolution. The Thatcher administration's reform of the London Stock Exchange was an economic enterprise intended to end restrictive practices and open the City to competition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy012DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Stateless Persons, Eligible Citizens and Protected Places: The British Nationality Act in Vanuatu.

Authors:
Gregory Rawlings

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Mar;30(1):53-80

University of Otago.

The British Nationality Act (BNA) of 1948 was designed to provide a form of supranational citizenship to accommodate the separate nationality provisions that were beginning to proliferate as a result of constitutional change within the late empire, decolonization and the formation of the Commonwealth. Under the provisions of the BNA, members of the Commonwealth would continue to be unified by transnational forms of citizenship, at least in principle. The Act aimed to cover every political arrangement conceivable in the late empire and early Commonwealth and contributed to the transformation of Great Britain into a multicultural society, by providing the legal vehicle for immigration into the UK in the second half of the twentieth century. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy011DOI Listing
March 2019
33 Reads

Multiple Deprivation, the Inner City, and the Fracturing of the Welfare State: Glasgow, c. 1968-78.

Authors:
Aaron Andrews

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Dec;29(4):605-624

University of Leicester.

From 1968, the central government established a series of area-based initiatives that operated on the basis of 'positive discrimination' towards the social needs of local residents. Over the course of the next 10 years, this area-based positive discrimination became an increasingly important part of social policy in Britain. This article uses Glasgow as a case study to show, first, how both the local and the central government attempted to define the problem of 'multiple deprivation' in the 1970s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy010DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

The Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture 2017: The Geopolitical Is Personal: India, Britain, and American Foreign Correspondents in the 1930s and 1940s.

Authors:
Deborah Cohen

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Sep;29(3):388-410

Northwestern University.

This lecture explores the shared terrain between the new international history and the history of emotions. In the summer and fall of 1942, American foreign correspondents played a key role in sparking a furore over British rule in India. Drawing on their own first-hand reporting from India, they depicted the British Empire as retrograde and abusive, a dangerous, destabilizing force and a threat to the post-war peace. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy009DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

'Modernization of Our Hospital System': The National Health Service, the Hospital Plan, and the 'Harness' Programme, 1962-77.

Authors:
Alistair Fair

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Dec;29(4):547-575

University of Edinburgh, UK.

This article augments the literature on the British experience of planning by examining attempts to plan the hospital system between 1962 and 1977. The Hospital Plan for England and Wales of 1962 proposed the construction of a suite of new 'District General Hospitals'. Underpinning this proposal was a belief in the value of standardized designs and construction methods, both of which were subsequently investigated in detail by the Ministry of Health and the Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6231428PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Community Business in Scotland: An Alternative Vision of 'Enterprise Culture', 1979-97.

Authors:
Gillian Murray

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Jun 9. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Glasgow Caledonian University, UK.

The force and coherency with which Margaret Thatcher and her inner circle outlined their vision for 'enterprise culture', like so many aspects of Thatcherism, have masked the complexity of its origins and the histories of alternative responses. This article provides a history of an alternative vision for enterprise culture by examining the community business movement in Scotland, the largest experiment of its kind in the UK in the 1980s and a forerunner of social enterprise. Working across Scotland, but with a hub of activity in the Strathclyde region, practitioners worked with local people to find ways to develop their neighbourhood economy while improving their environment, creating jobs, and developing services needed in their area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy007DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Aspiration, Agency, and the Production of New Selves in a Scottish New Town, c.1947-c.2016.

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Dec;29(4):576-604

University of Glasgow.

Narratives of deindustrialization, urban decline and failing public housing and the negative outcomes associated with these processes dominate accounts of post-war Scotland, bolstering the interpretation of Scottish exceptionalism in a British context. Within these accounts working people appear as victims of powerful and long-term external forces suffering sustained and ongoing deleterious vulnerabilities in terms of employment, health, and housing. This article challenges this picture by focusing on the first Scottish new town which made space for working people's aspiration and new models of the self manifested in new lifestyles and social relations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy006DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Exhibition Review Punk's 40th Anniversary-An Itchy Sort of Heritage.

Authors:
Lucy Robinson

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Jun;29(2):309-317

University of Sussex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx047DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

'Free and Equal Partners in Your Commonwealth': The Atlantic Charter and Anticolonial Delegations to London, 1941-3.

Authors:
Mark Reeves

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Jun;29(2):259-283

University of North Carolina, USA.

This article examines the efforts of two anticolonial politicians from the British Empire who used official visits to London and the rhetoric of the Atlantic Charter (14 August 1941) to advance their political careers and self-government for their territories: Burma's U Saw in 1941, and Nigeria's Nnamdi Azikiwe in 1943. Rather than a repetition of the 'Wilsonian moment', these campaigns show how anticolonial forces long active across the Empire took advantage of the opening offered by the Atlantic Charter to make claims on the British government in its wartime weakness. Both U Saw and Azikiwe had been involved in anticolonial politics long before the Charter, but its appearance provided an opportunity to advance their position vis-à-vis political competitors as well as to win concessions from the imperial state. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx043DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

'Cinderella of the Education System': Margaret Thatcher's Plan for Nursery Expansion in 1970s Britain.

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Jun;29(2):284-308

Columbia University, USA.

The Department of Education and Science, led by then Secretary of State Margaret Thatcher, published a White Paper in December 1972 calling for a dramatic expansion of public nursery education, so that it might be available within a decade to all families with 3- and 4-year-old children who chose to utilize it. While this failed policy is seldom remembered today, and Thatcher's efforts to promote the care and education of young children are not considered part of her considerable legacy, the White Paper's policy propositions challenge understandings about the formation and consistency of both Britain's child care policy and 'Thatcherism'. During this period, Thatcher believed that extending the frontiers of the state was appropriate to promote child welfare during the crucial first years of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx034DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Housing the Citizen-Consumer in Post-war Britain: The Parker Morris Report, Affluence and the Even Briefer Life of Social Democracy.

Authors:
Alistair Kefford

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Jun;29(2):225-258

University of Manchester, UK.

This article examines debates about the design and provision of post-war housing within the papers and report of the Parker Morris committee. It does so to show how the models of citizens' rights and expectations which underpinned post-war welfare provision were transformed by mass affluence and the dynamic sphere of commercial consumption. Parker Morris's deliberations demonstrate that, as early as the 1950s, the citizen-subject was reimagined as a consuming individual, with requirements based on their expressive needs and consuming desires, and that this had far-reaching consequences for social democratic systems of universal welfare provision. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx032DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Pension Funds and the Politics of Ownership in Britain, c. 1970-86.

Authors:
Aled Davies

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Mar;30(1):81-107

Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge.

The growth of occupational pensions in the post-war era transformed the pattern of capital ownership in Britain, as workers' collective retirement savings purchased a substantial share of the national economy. This article examines the response of the Labour and Conservative parties to this significant material change, and considers how it shaped their respective politics of ownership at the end of the post-war settlement. It demonstrates that Labour and the trade union movement recognized occupational pension funds as a new form of social ownership but had to reconcile their desire to give pension scheme-members direct control over their investments with a broader belief that the funds needed be used for a state-coordinated revitalization of the industrial economy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy005DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

TCBH Duncan Tanner Essay Prize Winner 2017: The 'Progress of a Slogan': Youth, Culture, and the Shaping of Everyday Political Languages in Late 1940s Britain.

Authors:
David Cowan

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Sep;29(3):435-458

University of Cambridge.

In 1948, worried that young people would take full employment and the welfare state for granted, the Labour Party trialled a new slogan: 'Ask your Dad'. This slogan encouraged the young to learn about the hardships which their parents had experienced in the inter-war years, largely under Conservative governments. Using archived interviews and letters sent to the press, this article provides the first study of the popular reception of this slogan. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy004DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

'Co-operation and Communism cannot work side by side': Organized Consumers and the Early Cold War in Britain.

Authors:
Peter Gurney

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Sep;30(3):347-374

Department of History, University of Essex, UK.

This article contributes to a better understanding of labour anti-communism in Britain through an exploration of the evolution of ideas and attitudes within the co-operative movement during the early Cold War. It demonstrates that the period witnessed an increasingly rigid separation of co-operation from communism and argues that this separation made it harder for activists within the co-operative movement to imagine a total or utopian alternative to capitalism. Drawing particularly on a close reading of the co-operative press as well as other sources, the study is divided into three main parts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy003DOI Listing
September 2019
2 Reads

The 'Conchie Corps': Conflict, Compromise and Conscientious Objection in the British Army, 1940-1945.

Authors:
Linsey Robb

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Sep;29(3):411-434

Northumbria University, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy002DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

On Tour with the Prince: Monarchy, Imperial Politics and Publicity in the Prince of Wales's Dominion Tours 1919-20.

Authors:
Frank Mort

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Mar;29(1):25-57

Department of History, University of Manchester, UK.

The stage managers of ritual and the media transformed the British monarchy in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century, consolidating its image as splendid and popular and also as more accessible and quasi-democratic. Historians have emphasized that these processes of modernization largely began in Britain. This article locates the origins of democratized royal ritual in the white dominions, especially after 1918. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx037DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads

International Institutions and Domestic Reform: Equal Pay and British Membership in the European Economic Community.

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Mar;29(1):104-128

Northeastern University, USA.

Despite having been overlooked in the standard histories of the UK and the European Community, gender politics and gender policies played a significant role in Britain's applications for membership in the EEC in the 1960s. Joining the European Community required that Britain comply with Article 119 on equal pay for equal work. A combination of domestic feminist and labour movement activism, the commitment of unions and parties, and the internationalization of formal commitments to women's rights constituted internal and external pressures for the passage of an Equal Pay Act in 1970. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/tcbh/article/29/1/104/4092860
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx045DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Reflections on 'British Studies in a Broken World', July 2017.

Authors:
Sam Wetherell

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Mar;29(1):156-160

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx046DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

Liberal Party Politics, the South African War, and the Rhetoric of Imperial Governance.

Authors:
Simon Mackley

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Mar;29(1):1-24

The University of Exeter, UK.

This article examines the imperial rhetoric of the Liberal Party during the South African War of 1899-1902, charting its use and development across five key controversies spanning the course of the conflict. Moving beyond traditional interpretations of the Liberal split as the product of competing visions of Empire and approaches to imperialism, this article argues for the need to recognize also the continuities within the imperial rhetoric of fin-de-siècle British Liberalism. Building on recent studies of political languages, it identifies how Liberal speakers from across the party operated within a rhetorical framework that emphasized three ideals of imperial governance: good government, self-government, and pluralism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx039DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

Landlordism, Rent Regulation and the Labour Party in mid-twentieth century Britain, 1950-64.

Authors:
Phil Child

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Mar;29(1):79-103

University of Birmingham.

This article examines the politics of private renting in 1950s and early 1960s Britain, through the radical approach taken by Labour Party towards private landlords. Through setting the radical aims of Labour in a mid-twentieth-century context of decrepit housing, rising rents and sluggish public housing programmes, Labour's rationale in arguing for the 'abolition' of the private landlord is more transparent. This article takes a chronological approach, investigating what actions Labour actors took, at local and national level, and what effect this had on the wider housing market. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx036DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

'A Tactical Manoeuvre to Apply Pressure': Race and the Role of Public Inquiries in the 1980 Bristol 'Riot'.

Authors:
Simon Peplow

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Mar;29(1):129-155

University of Exeter, UK.

When violence erupted on the streets of England in 1981, it undoubtedly shocked the country in its scope and severity. However, such disorder had been foreshadowed when the St Pauls area of Bristol saw anti-police disturbances on 2 April 1980. This article focusses on the responses to this, from the local community and organizations as well as local and national government, which in the historiography has often been relegated to passing mentions prior to detailed discussion of the 1981 events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx021DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

Working-Class Ideas and Experiences of Sexuality in Twentieth-Century Britain: Regionalism as a Category of Analysis.

Authors:
Helen Smith

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Mar;29(1):58-78

University of Lincoln.

This article will explore region as a category of analysis for understanding gender, sexual cultures, and the expression of same-sex desire. In unpicking the notion of regional difference in both its tangible and intangible forms, it outlines the corresponding impact on how sexual cultures developed and were experienced in twentieth-century Britain. By recognizing that the area in which an individual lived could have as much impact on their sense of self and their sexual experiences as issues of race, gender, and class, a new and fruitful avenue of interpretation is opened up for the history of sexuality and twentieth-century British history more broadly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx019DOI Listing
March 2018
22 Reads

Environmental History and New Directions in Modern British Historiography.

Authors:
Andrew Seaton

20 Century Br Hist 2019 Sep;30(3):447-456

New York University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwy001DOI Listing
September 2019
2 Reads

Dad 'never said much' but… Young Men and Great War Veterans in Day-to-Day-Life in Interwar Britain.

Authors:
Joel Morley

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Jun;29(2):199-224

University of Essex.

This article explores whether, how, and what young men in interwar Britain heard about the Great War from its veterans. Oral histories are used to enable the first detailed examination of the hitherto largely unexplored topic of the intergenerational transmission of representations of the Great War in interwar Britain. It shows that although many veterans were reticent about their war experiences, young men heard about Great War experiences from veterans more frequently than has previously been acknowledged. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx063DOI Listing
June 2018
5 Reads

'The Lights of the Electric Octopus Have Been Switched Off': Visual and Political Culture in Edwardian London.

Authors:
James Thompson

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Sep;29(3):331-356

University of Bristol.

This article reconstructs the visual culture of politics in Edwardian London through a study of the 1907 London County Council election. It moves beyond the memorable account given in Graham Wallas's Human Nature in Politics to examine the actors, especially associations and newspapers, that participated in the election. Drawing upon newspapers, election addresses, cartoon, leaflets, and posters, the article argues that Edwardian London was a prime site in the application of new media for political communication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx062DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Commercial Heritage as Democratic Action: Historicizing the 'Save the Market' Campaigns in Bradford and Chesterfield, 1969-76.

Authors:
Sarah Mass

20 Century Br Hist 2018 Sep;29(3):459-484

The University of Michigan, USA.

This article argues that the traditional retail market-a ubiquitous commercial feature of British towns and cities-produced a particular strand of heritage politics in late 1960s and early 1970s Britain. In recovering the activists involved in two campaigns to 'save the market' from redevelopment-one unsuccessful campaign in Bradford and one successful campaign in Chesterfield-I make the case for thinking through local urban heritage movements in comparative terms, focusing on how place-based citizenship collided with a nascent, national 'anti-development' mood in the early 1970s. The campaigns in Bradford and Chesterfield defended the transhistorical 'publicness' of the retail market-its spatial centrality, its collective ownership, and its relief of town or city rates-as a critique of contemporary, undemocratic privatization of communal space. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx061DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads