Acceptability and impact on anthropometry of a locally developed ready-to-use therapeutic food in pre-school children in Vietnam.

Tran T Nga, Marie Nguyen, Roger Mathisen, Do T B Hoa, Nguyen H Minh, Jacques Berger, Frank T Wieringa

Acceptability and impact on anthropometry of a locally developed ready-to-use therapeutic food in pre-school children in Vietnam.

Authors:
Mr Roger Mathisen, MSC, RD
Mr Roger Mathisen, MSC, RD
FHI 360 | Alive & Thrive
Clinical Nutritionist | Public Health Manager | Regional Technical Advisor
Nutrition, Infant and Young Child Feeding, severe Acute Malnutrition, Micronutrients, Maternity Protection, Public Policy
Hanoi | Vietnam

Nutr J 2013 Aug 15;12:120. Epub 2013 Aug 15.

UMR 204 NUTRIPASS « Prevention of Malnutrition and associated pathologies », IRD-UMR2-UMR1, Institute of Research for Development (IRD), Montpellier, France.

Background: In South East Asia, concerns exist about the acceptability of peanut-based Ready-to-Use-Therapeutic-Foods (RUTF) for the treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Therefore, an alternative, culturally acceptable RUTF made from locally available ingredients and complying with local food traditions and preferences was developed. The current study evaluated its acceptability and impact on anthropometry.

Methods: The study was a randomized, two-arm, cross-over intervention trial to test the acceptability of the local product (bar) against a commercially available, peanut-based RUTF paste (Plumpy'nut®). Children (n = 67) from two kindergartens in a rural area of North Vietnam were recruited. The age of the children was between 3 and 5 years.

Results: The Vietnamese RUTF was well-accepted, although overall acceptability was less than of Plumpy'nut®, with the latter scoring higher on palatability (P < 0.05). In contrast, reluctance to eat Plumpy'nut® was higher than for the Vietnamese RUTF (P < 0.05). Impact on anthropmetrical indices was similar for both RUTF. The nutritional status of the children who consumed the two RUTF over a 4 week period improved significantly, with a mean weight gain of 0.64 (SD 0.27) Kg, and increases in WHZ and HAZ z-scores of 0.48 (SD 0.30) and 0.05 (SD 0.13) respectively (P < 0.01 both). Weight gain was similar between the 2 products (0.32 kg per 2 weeks for both).

Conclusions: Both the commercial Plumpy'nut® and the local produced RUTF were accepted although the harder consistency of the local product might have caused the lower overall acceptance. The promising increase in nutritional status needs to be confirmed in a controlled trial in children with SAM.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-12-120DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3854793PMC
August 2013
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3 Citations
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