Introduction: The anterolateral Ligament (ALL) is a true well-defined ligament in the knee first described in 1879 by Segond. After the work of Claes and his colleagues, several studies were conducted about biomechanics and its role in stability of the knee. The anatomical existence of the ALL has been studied by cadaveric and various radiographic diagnostic modalities. It originates from lateral femoral epicondyle and is inserted between Gerdy’s tubercle and the fibular head. There has been c

Overview

Introduction: The anterolateral Ligament (ALL) is a true well-defined ligament in the knee first described in 1879 by Segond. After the work of Claes and his colleagues, several studies were conducted about biomechanics and its role in stability of the knee. The anatomical existence of the ALL has been studied by cadaveric and various radiographic diagnostic modalities. It originates from lateral femoral epicondyle and is inserted between Gerdy’s tubercle and the fibular head. There has been controversy about the existence of ALL in pediatric patients. The aim of this work is to confirm the presence of ALL in pediatric patients by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: We reviewed the knee MRI scans of 100 pediatric patients (ages between one and 12 yr) who had no knee injury or congenital deformity and had been evaluated by an expert radiologist. Results: The ALL was detected in 90% of the pediatric patients with the use of MRI. Conclusions: The main finding of this study is that anterolateral ligaments (ALL) can be seen in pediatric patients using MRI. Despite numerous studies, additional research is needed to further define the role of the ALL in knee function.

Summary

Introduction: The anterolateral Ligament (ALL) is a true well-defined ligament in the knee first described in 1879 by Segond. After the work of Claes and his colleagues, several studies were conducted about biomechanics and its role in stability of the knee. The anatomical existence of the ALL has been studied by cadaveric and various radiographic diagnostic modalities. It originates from lateral femoral epicondyle and is inserted between Gerdy’s tubercle and the fibular head. There has been controversy about the existence of ALL in pediatric patients. The aim of this work is to confirm the presence of ALL in pediatric patients by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: We reviewed the knee MRI scans of 100 pediatric patients (ages between one and 12 yr) who had no knee injury or congenital deformity and had been evaluated by an expert radiologist. Results: The ALL was detected in 90% of the pediatric patients with the use of MRI. Conclusions: The main finding of this study is that anterolateral ligaments (ALL) can be seen in pediatric patients using MRI. Despite numerous studies, additional research is needed to further define the role of the ALL in knee function.

Author Comments

Dr. Hesham N Mustafa, MD
Dr. Hesham N Mustafa, MD
King Abdulaziz University
Associate Professor
Cell Biology - Electron Microscopy
Jeddah, Western Region | Saudi Arabia
Introduction: The anterolateral Ligament (ALL) is a true well-defined ligament in the knee first described in 1879 by Segond. After the work of Claes and his colleagues, several studies were conducted about biomechanics and its role in stability of the knee. The anatomical existence of the ALL has been studied by cadaveric and various radiographic diagnostic modalities. It originates from lateral femoral epicondyle and is inserted between Gerdy’s tubercle and the fibular head. There has been controversy about the existence of ALL in pediatric patients. The aim of this work is to confirm the presence of ALL in pediatric patients by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: We reviewed the knee MRI scans of 100 pediatric patients (ages between one and 12 yr) who had no knee injury or congenital deformity and had been evaluated by an expert radiologist. Results: The ALL was detected in 90% of the pediatric patients with the use of MRI. Conclusions: The main finding of this study is that anterolateral ligaments (ALL) can be seen in pediatric patients using MRI. Despite numerous studies, additional research is needed to further define the role of the ALL in knee function.Dr. Hesham N Mustafa, MD

Resources

https://journals.lww.com/c-orthopaedicpractice/Abstract/9000/Anterolateral_ligament_in_pediatric_knees__A.99024.aspx
https://journals.lww.com/c-orthopaedicpractice/Abstract/9000/Anterolateral_ligament_in_pediatric_knees__A.99024.aspx

Anterolateral Ligament in Pediatric Knees: Radiological Study

Curr Orthop Pract

Doi:10.1097/BCO.0000000000000885

Introduction: 

The anterolateral Ligament (ALL) is a true well-defined ligament in the knee first described in 1879 by Segond. After the work of Claes and his colleagues, several studies were conducted about biomechanics and its role in stability of the knee. The anatomical existence of the ALL has been studied by cadaveric and various radiographic diagnostic modalities. It originates from lateral femoral epicondyle and is inserted between Gerdy’s tubercle and the fibular head. There has been controversy about the existence of ALL in pediatric patients. The aim of this work is to confirm the presence of ALL in pediatric patients by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Materials and Methods: 

We reviewed the knee MRI scans of 100 pediatric patients (ages between one and 12 yr) who had no knee injury or congenital deformity and had been evaluated by an expert radiologist.

Results: 

The ALL was detected in 90% of the pediatric patients with the use of MRI.

Conclusions: 

The main finding of this study is that anterolateral ligaments (ALL) can be seen in pediatric patients using MRI. Despite numerous studies, additional research is needed to further define the role of the ALL in knee function.

May 2020
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