A Retrospective Review to Ascertain the Incidence of Occult Anemia in Female College Athletes Using Hematocrits

Overview

The study hypothesized the incidence of anemia differs between sports. By measuring Hct in collegiate level athletes, the goal is to provide data that can be used to determine if there is a need to implement routine screening for occult anemia in female athletes.

Summary

Based off of this study, screening may be warranted among female college athletes participating in basketball. Over time, with a larger sample size, we may see more sports for which routine screening for anemia would be beneficial.

A Retrospective Review to Ascertain the Incidence of Occult Anemia in Female College Athletes Using Hematocrits in: 2020 AMSSM Oral Research Poster Presentations,

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: March 2020 - Volume 30 - Issue 2 - p 108-171

Purpose: The study hypothesized the incidence of anemia differs between sports. By measuring Hct in collegiate level athletes, the goal is to provide data that can be used to determine if there is a need to implement routine screening for occult anemia in female athletes.

Methods: Retrospective study of 265 Division I NCAA female athletes Hct values that participated in university sports offered between 2011 and 2018. Anemia was defined as Hct value <36. Athletes and results were de-identified. Participants were grouped by sport, age, high versus low endurance sports in relation to Hct. Incidence of anemia in these categories was conducted using χ2 statistical analysis.

Results: The χ2 analysis of the incidence of anemia for individual sports compared to others indicated that basketball had a P-value of 0.0076. Thus, showing basketball is associated with an increase risk of anemia. Fourteen of 38 basketball players had anemia. Golf versus other sports resulted in a P-value of 0.9139, which was not significant, showing no association between female golf athletes and anemia. The same was true for softball, tennis, track and volleyball with P-value equal to 0.4625, 0.4296, 0.3619, and 0.2687; respectively. The opposite was true for soccer, with a P-value = 0.0090 with 3 of 52 athletes having anemia. This implies an association between low incidence of anemia and soccer. There was no association seen between age versus anemia or endurance versus anemia with P-values of 0.0514 and 0.5527.

Conclusions: Although the sample size was lower than anticipated, the results supported an association between certain sports and anemia. Namely, female basketball athletes had a higher incidence of anemia compared to those female athletes who participated in volleyball, track, tennis, softball, golf and soccer. Soccer showed the lowest incidence of female athletes with anemia when compared to all others university sports that females participated in.

Significance: Based off of this study, screening may be warranted among female college athletes participating in basketball. Over time, with a larger sample size, we may see more sports for which routine screening for anemia would be beneficial.

Acknowledgements: We would like to thank Miles Lanes, lean engineer, for his help with the statistical analysis.

May 2020
111 Reads

Similar Publications