Redefining neuromarketing as an integrated science of influence.

Front Hum Neurosci 2014 12;8:1073. Epub 2015 Feb 12.

Applied Neuromarketing Consortium, Medill, Kellogg, and Feinberg Schools, Northwestern University Evanston, IL, USA ; Department of Statistics, Northwestern University Evanston, IL, USA ; Department of Psychology, Drexel University Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Multiple transformative forces target marketing, many of which derive from new technologies that allow us to sample thinking in real time (i.e., brain imaging), or to look at large aggregations of decisions (i.e., big data). There has been an inclination to refer to the intersection of these technologies with the general topic of marketing as "neuromarketing". There has not been a serious effort to frame neuromarketing, which is the goal of this paper. Neuromarketing can be compared to neuroeconomics, wherein neuroeconomics is generally focused on how individuals make "choices", and represent distributions of choices. Neuromarketing, in contrast, focuses on how a distribution of choices can be shifted or "influenced", which can occur at multiple "scales" of behavior (e.g., individual, group, or market/society). Given influence can affect choice through many cognitive modalities, and not just that of valuation of choice options, a science of influence also implies a need to develop a model of cognitive function integrating attention, memory, and reward/aversion function. The paper concludes with a brief description of three domains of neuromarketing application for studying influence, and their caveats.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.01073DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325919PMC
February 2015
6 Reads
1 Citation
2.900 Impact Factor

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

science influence
8
focuses distribution
4
distribution choices
4
contrast focuses
4
neuromarketing contrast
4
distributions choices
4
choices neuromarketing
4
choices shifted
4
shifted "influenced"
4
"scales" behavior
4
behavior individual
4
multiple "scales"
4
occur multiple
4
represent distributions
4
"influenced" occur
4
individual group
4
"choices" represent
4
neuromarketing goal
4
goal paper
4
frame neuromarketing
4

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Information theory in molecular biology
Adami et al.
Phys. Life Rev. 2004

Banks et al.
2011
A general circuitry processing reward/aversion information and its implications for neuropsychiatric illness
Breiter et al.
2004
Recurrent and robust patterns underlying human relative preference and associations with brain circuitry plus genetics in (U Minn, Institute of Mathematics and its Applications)
Breiter et al.
2008

Similar Publications