Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: building on success.

Nat Rev Immunol 2006 May;6(5):383-93

National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, Room 3-5762, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1201, USA.

Adoptive cell transfer after host preconditioning by lymphodepletion represents an important advance in cancer immunotherapy. Here, we describe how a lymphopaenic environment enables tumour-reactive T cells to destroy large burdens of metastatic tumour and how the state of differentiation of the adoptively transferred T cells can affect the outcome of treatment. We also discuss how the translation of these new findings might further improve the efficacy of adoptive cell transfer through the use of vaccines, haematopoietic-stem-cell transplantation, modified preconditioning regimens, and alternative methods for the generation and selection of the T cells to be transferred.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nri1842DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1473162PMC
May 2006
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