Peptide S is a novel potent inhibitor of voluntary and fast-induced food intake in rats.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2005 Jul;332(3):859-65

University Henri Poincaré, Neurocal, 38 rue Lionnois, 54000 Nancy, France.

Peptide S (NPS or PEPS) and its cognate receptor have been recently identified both in the central nervous system and in the periphery. NPS/PEPS promotes arousal and has potent anxiolytic-like effects when it is injected centrally in mice. In the present experiment, we tested by different approaches its central effects on feeding behaviour in Long-Evans rats. PEPS at doses of 1 and 10 microg injected in the lateral brain ventricle strongly inhibited by more than 50% chow intake in overnight fasted rats with effects of longer duration with the highest dose (P<0.0001). A similar decrease was observed for the spontaneous intake of a high-energy palatable diet (-48%; P<0.0001). This anorexigenic effect was comparable to that induced by corticotropin-releasing hormone in fasted rats at equimolar doses. However, peptide S did not modify food intake stimulated by neuropeptide Y (NPY) at equimolar doses. It also did not affect the fasting concentrations of important modulators of food intake like leptin, ghrelin, and insulin in circulation. This study therefore showed that peptide S is a new potent anorexigenic agent when centrally injected. Its inhibitory action appears to be independent of the NPY, ghrelin, and leptin pathways. Development of peptide S agonists could constitute a new approach for the treatment of obesity.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.05.029DOI Listing
July 2005
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