Challenges and opportunities for future Canadian physician-scientists: Perspectives of four experts.

Clin Invest Med 2020 Sep 24;43(3):E15-24. Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.

In this series of interviews, the Clinical and Investigative Medicine editorial team gathered expert opinions on the future of physician-scientist training and career prospects in Canada. This was inspired by recent publications that voiced concerns over the diminishing support for the physician-scientist in Canada and the United States. For this editorial, the term physician-scientist was intentionally broad and inclusive; referring to individuals who identify both clinical work and biomedical or healthcare research as major components of their career. The following leaders in medical research or research funding shared their perspectives: Roderick R. McInnes; Michel G. Bergeron; Thomas J. Marrie; and Bev J. Holmes.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.25011/cim.v43i3.34473DOI Listing
September 2020

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

physician-scientist intentionally
4
term physician-scientist
4
editorial term
4
states editorial
4
intentionally broad
4
broad inclusive
4
individuals identify
4
referring individuals
4
inclusive referring
4
united states
4
canada united
4
inspired publications
4
canada inspired
4
prospects canada
4
publications voiced
4
voiced concerns
4
support physician-scientist
4
diminishing support
4
concerns diminishing
4
identify clinical
4

Similar Publications

Physician-Scientist trainees: A "call to action" to confront future career challenges.

Clin Invest Med 2020 09 24;43(3):E25-26. Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON.

Throughout their careers, physician-scientists must adapt to the dynamic landscape of the medical research environment. As such, current physicianscientist trainees must overcome unique obstacles on the path to productive research careers. In the paper by Levit et al. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2020

The Rising Challenge of Training Physician-Scientists: Recommendations From a Canadian National Consensus Conference.

Acad Med 2018 02;93(2):172-178

M.J. Strong is professor of clinical neurological sciences and dean, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. N. Busing is project lead, Future of Medical Education in Canada Postgraduate Project, and family physician, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. D.L. Goosney is executive director, Tri-agency Institutional Programs Secretariat, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. K.A. Harris is executive director, Office of Specialty Education, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. T. Horsley is associate director, Research Unit, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. A. Kuzyk was the 2015-2016 president, Clinical Investigator Trainee Association of Canada (CITAC), and is an MD/PhD candidate, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. L. Lingard is professor and director, Center for Education Research & Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. W.V. Norman is associate professor and director, Clinician Scholar Program, Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. N.D. Rosenblum is professor and Canada Research Chair in Developmental Nephrology, Department of Paediatrics, and associate dean, Physician Scientist Training, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. T. Saryeddine is executive director of research and innovation, HealthCareCAN, and adjunct professor, Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. X. Wang is an MD/PhD candidate, University of Toronto, and was the 2014-2015 president, CITAC, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Physician-scientists are individuals who actively participate in patient care, have undergone additional research training, and devote the majority of their time to research. Physician-scientists are traditionally the primary catalysts in bridging the translational gap-that is, the failure to link fundamental new knowledge in the pathobiology of disease with advances in health care and health policy in a timely manner. However, there has been a shift away from training physician-scientists, and financial support for the physician-scientist is diminishing globally, causing the translational gap to grow. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2018

Challenges facing physician scientist trainees: a survey of trainees in Canada's largest undergraduate and postgraduate programs in a single centre.

Clin Invest Med 2014 Oct 4;37(5):E268-83. Epub 2014 Oct 4.

Purpose: A number of indicators suggest that the physician scientist career track is threatened. As such, it is an opportune time to evaluate current training models. Perspectives on physician scientist education and career path were surveyed in trainees at the University of Toronto, home to Canada's longest standing physician scientist training programs. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2014

The physician-scientist career pipeline in 2005: build it, and they will come.

JAMA 2005 Sep;294(11):1343-51

Section of Stem Cell Biology, Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Mo 63110, USA.

Context: Physician-scientists play a unique and critical role in medical research. Nonetheless, a number of trends followed during the 1980s and 1990s revealed that this career pathway was in serious jeopardy. Physician-scientists were declining in number and were getting older. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2005