How to test the antimicrobial properties of wood?

Muhammad Tanveer Munir, Hélène Pailhories, Matthieu Eveillard, Mark Irle, Florence Aviat, Laurence Dubreil, Michel Federighi, Christophe Belloncle

Overview

Based on the available literature, this review classifies previously used methods into two broad categories: one category tests wood material by direct bacterial contact, and the other tests the action of molecules previously extracted from wood on bacteria and fungi. This article discusses the suitability of these methods to wood materials and exposes knowledge gaps that can be used to guide future research. This information is intended to help the researchers and field experts to select suitable methods for testing the hygienic safety and antimicrobial properties of wood materials.

Summary

Some wood species have antimicrobial properties, making them a better choice over inert surfaces in certain circumstances. However, the organic and porous nature of wood raises questions regarding the use of this material in hygienically important places. Therefore, it is reasonable to investigate the microbial survival and the antimicrobial potential of wood via a variety of methods.

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Author Comments

Dr. Muhammad Tanveer Munir, DVM, MS
Dr. Muhammad Tanveer Munir, DVM, MS
Ecole Superieur du Bois, Nantes, France
Scientific researcher
Nantes, Pays de la loire | France
This information is a guide for scientists and field experts to choose the suitable method according to their resources and need.Dr. Muhammad Tanveer Munir, DVM, MS

Resources

One Health Cooperation
https://1healthco.wixsite.com/1hco/single-post/2013/05/01/This-is-the-title-of-your-first-image-post

Testing the Antimicrobial Characteristics of Wood Materials: A Review of Methods.

Authors:
Dr. Muhammad Tanveer Munir, DVM, MS
Dr. Muhammad Tanveer Munir, DVM, MS
Ecole Superieur du Bois, Nantes, France
Scientific researcher
Nantes, Pays de la loire | France

Antibiotics (Basel) 2020 May 1;9(5). Epub 2020 May 1.

Laboratoire Innovation Matériau Bois Habitat Apprentissage (LIMBHA), Ecole Supérieure du Bois, 7 rue Christian Pauc, 44306 Nantes, France.

Some wood species have antimicrobial properties, making them a better choice over inert surfaces in certain circumstances. However, the organic and porous nature of wood raises questions regarding the use of this material in hygienically important places. Therefore, it is reasonable to investigate the microbial survival and the antimicrobial potential of wood via a variety of methods. Based on the available literature, this review classifies previously used methods into two broad categories: one category tests wood material by direct bacterial contact, and the other tests the action of molecules previously extracted from wood on bacteria and fungi. This article discusses the suitability of these methods to wood materials and exposes knowledge gaps that can be used to guide future research. This information is intended to help the researchers and field experts to select suitable methods for testing the hygienic safety and antimicrobial properties of wood materials.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9050225DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7277147PMC
May 2020

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References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Wood Based Bedding Material in Animal Production: A Minireview
Munir et al.
APDV 2019

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