Iris claw IOL

C V Sumitha, Vijay Pai, Mithun Thulasidas

Overview

Secondary implantations of retropupillary IC?IOL have been the preferred procedure in cases where iris support is feasible.[18] As IC?IOL is attached to the midperiphery of the iris, complications related to the size of IOL and damage to the angle of anterior chamber and the root of iris are avoided. The unique enclavation system allows centration of the IOL on the pupillary axis, which is important in eyes with decentered pupils. Also, IC?IOLs do not interfere with iris physiological vascularization or cause distortion of pupil

Summary

Our study demonstrates that retropupillary IC?IOL implantation in aphakic eyes without adequate capsular support is a safe, predictable and effective procedure with a good visual outcome and less intraoperative and postoperative complications.

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Author Comments

Mithun Thulasidas, MBBS, MS
Mithun Thulasidas, MBBS, MS
Centre for Sight
Fellow
Ophthalmology
New Delhi, Delhi | India
Our study demonstrates that retropupillary IC?IOL implantation in aphakic eyes without adequate capsular support is a safe, predictable and effective procedure with a good visual outcome and less intraoperative and postoperative complications.Mithun Thulasidas, MBBS, MS

Retropupillary iris-claw intraocular lens implantation in aphakic patients.

Authors:
Mithun Thulasidas, MBBS, MS
Mithun Thulasidas, MBBS, MS
Centre for Sight
Fellow
Ophthalmology
New Delhi, Delhi | India

Indian J Ophthalmol 2020 04;68(4):597-602

Centre for Sight Eye Institute, Plot No. 9, Sector 9, Dwarka, New Delhi, India.

Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of implantation of an iris-claw intraocular lens (IC-IOL) in retropupillary position in aphakic patients.

Methods: We conducted a prospective interventional study, including 36 aphakic eyes with inadequate capsular support. The postoperative examination included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, central corneal thickness (CCT), and anterior segment examination with emphasis on the anterior chamber reaction and shape of pupil. Follow-up was done for 3 months.

Results: Thirty-six eyes of 34 patients, including 22 right eyes and 14 left eyes were included. Indications for surgery were complicated cataract surgery in 38.9% (n = 14), aphakia in 27.8% (n = 10), pseudophakic bullous keratopathy in 16.7% (n = 6), dislocated posterior chamber IOL (PCIOL) in 11.1% (n = 4), IC drop in 2.8% (n = 1), and subluxated PCIOL in 2.8% (n = 1). Postoperatively, the visual acuity improved by at least two lines in 32 (88.9%) and worsened in four (11.1%) eyes at the end of three months. Mean postoperative IOP at the end of the third month was 12.42 mmHg (standard deviation [SD] 2.57; range 11.55-13.29 mmHg). The mean postoperative CCT at the end of the third month was 542.42 microns (SD 13.77; range 537.76-547.07 microns). Sixteen eyes (44.4%) had horizontally oval pupil, eleven eyes (30.6%) had round pupil, and nine eyes (25%) had irregular pupil. Twenty-three eyes (63.9%) presented with significant anterior chamber reaction and seven eyes (19.4%) had corneal stromal edema on postoperative day 1.

Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that retropupillary IC-IOL implantation in eyes without adequate capsular support is an effective and safe procedure with a good visual outcome and fewer complications.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijo.IJO_1043_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7210845PMC
April 2020
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