Defining and expanding the phenotype of -associated developmental epileptic encephalopathy.

Neurol Genet 2019 Dec 10;5(6):e373. Epub 2019 Dec 10.

Department of Epilepsy Genetics and Precision Medicine (K.J.M., E.G., G.R., R.S.M.), The Danish Epilepsy Centre Filadelfia, Dianalund, Denmark; Institute for Regional Health Services (K.J.M., E.G., R.S.M.), University of Southern Denmark, Odense; Institute of Human Genetics (D.M., R. Jamra, A.F., J.R.L.), University of Leipzig Medical Center, Germany; Institute of Structural Biology (R. Janowski, D.N.), Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany; Department of Paediatric Radiology (C.R.), University of Leipzig Medical Center, Germany; Department of Epilepsy, Sleep and Pediatric Neurophysiology (J.T.), Lyon University Hospital, France; Neuropediatric Unit (A.-L.P., D.M.V., G.L.), Lyon University Hospital, France; Department of Medical Genetics (N.C., G.L.), Lyon University Hospital, France; GenDev Team (N.C.), CNRS UMR 5292, INSERM U1028, CNRL and University of Lyon, France; Department of Genetics (E.B.), University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Child Neurology (K.G.), Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Paediatrics (A.P.B.), Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Denmark; Baylor College of Medicine (S.M., K.N.), Children's Hospital of San Antonio; Undiagnosed Diseases Program (G.B., C.P.), Genetic Services of Western Australia, Department of Health, Government of Western Australia, Perth; Western Australian Register of Developmental Anomalies (G.B., D.G.), Australia; Telethon Kids Institute and the School of Paediatrics and Child Health (G.B.), University of Western Australia, Perth; Linear Clinical Research (L.D.), WA, Australia; Center of Human Genetics (S.S), Jena University Hospital, Germany; Department of Neuropediatrics (A.D.), Jena University Hospital, Germany; Division of Neurology (K.L.H.), Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA; Division of Neuropediatrics (A.M.), University of Leipzig Medical Center, Germany; Amplexa Genetics (H.H.), Odense, Denmark; Clinic for Children (H.H.), Værløse, Denmark; Center for Integrative Brain Research (G.M.), Seattle Children's Research Institute, WA; Department of Pediatrics (G.M.), University of Washington, Seattle; Medical Genetics Unit (F.B.), Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy; Istituto Dermopatico dell'Immacolata (F.B.), IDI-IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Institute of Human Genetics (T.B., M.H.), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany; Childrens Hospital (J.D.), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany; University of Copenhagen (G.R.), Denmark; Institute for Human Genetics (P.M.), University Hospital Magdeburg, Germany; Children's Hospital A. Meyer (R.G., A.V.), University of Florence, Italy; and Institute of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology (D.N.), Ulm University, Germany.

Objective: The study is aimed at widening the clinical and genetic spectrum and at assessing genotype-phenotype associations in encephalopathy.

Methods: Through diagnostic gene panel screening in an epilepsy cohort, and recruiting through GeneMatcher and our international network, we collected 10 patients with biallelic variants. In addition, we collected data on 12 patients described in the literature to further delineate the associated phenotype in a total cohort of 22 patients. Computer modeling was used to assess changes on protein folding.

Results: Biallelic pathogenic variants in cause a triad of progressive microcephaly, moderate to severe developmental delay, and early-onset epilepsy. Microcephaly was present at birth in 65%, and in all patients at follow-up. Moderate (14%) or severe (73%) developmental delay was characteristic, with no achievement of sitting (85%), walking (86%), or talking (90%). Additional features included irritability (91%), hypertonia/spasticity (75%), hypotonia (83%), stereotypic movements (75%), and short stature (56%). Seventy-nine percent had pharmacoresistant epilepsy with mainly neonatal onset. Characteristic cranial MRI findings include early-onset progressive atrophy of cerebral cortex (89%) and cerebellum (61%), enlargement of ventricles (95%), and age-dependent delayed myelination (88%). A small subset of patients displayed a less severe phenotype.

Conclusions: These data revealed first genotype-phenotype associations and may serve for improved interpretation of new variants and well-founded genetic counseling.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/NXG.0000000000000373DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6927360PMC
December 2019

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

genotype-phenotype associations
8
developmental delay
8
patients
5
talking 90%
4
movements 75%
4
90% additional
4
86% talking
4
walking 86%
4
characteristic achievement
4
achievement sitting
4
sitting 85%
4
85% walking
4
additional features
4
features included
4
75% hypotonia
4
hypotonia 83%
4
83% stereotypic
4
hypertonia/spasticity 75%
4
91% hypertonia/spasticity
4
delay characteristic
4

Similar Publications