Postoperative outcomes following pediatric intracranial electrode monitoring: A case for stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG).

Epilepsy Behav 2020 Mar 3;104(Pt A):106905. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, United States of America; Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, United States of America. Electronic address:

Background: For patients with medically refractory epilepsy, intracranial electrode monitoring can help identify epileptogenic foci. Despite the increasing utilization of stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG), the relative risks or benefits associated with the technique when compared with the traditional subdural electrode monitoring (SDE) remain unclear, especially in the pediatric population. Our aim was to compare the outcomes of pediatric patients who received intracranial monitoring with SEEG or SDE (grids and strips).

Methods: We retrospectively studied 38 consecutive pediatric intracranial electrode monitoring cases performed at our institution from 2014 to 2017. Medical/surgical history and operative/postoperative records were reviewed. We also compared direct inpatient hospital costs associated with the two procedures.

Results: Stereoelectroencephalography and SDE cohorts both showed high likelihood of identifying epileptogenic zones (SEEG: 90.9%, SDE: 87.5%). Compared with SDE, SEEG patients had a significantly shorter operative time (118.7 versus 233.4 min, P < .001) and length of stay (6.2 versus 12.3 days, P < .001), including days spent in the intensive care unit (ICU; 1.4 versus 5.4 days, P < .001). Stereoelectroencephalography patients tended to report lower pain scores and used significantly less narcotic pain medications (54.2 versus 197.3 mg morphine equivalents, P = .005). No complications were observed. Stereoelectroencephalography and SDE cohorts had comparable inpatient hospital costs (P = .47).

Conclusion: In comparison with subdural electrode placement, SEEG results in a similarly favorable clinical outcome, but with reduced operative time, decreased narcotic usage, and superior pain control without requiring significantly higher costs. The potential for an improved postoperative intracranial electrode monitoring experience makes SEEG especially suitable for pediatric patients.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.106905DOI Listing
March 2020

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