Heavy metal contamination in soil, water, and vegetables from Patna, India

Kumari Sonu, Ishwar Chandra Yadav, Amrendra Kumar, Ningombam Linthoingambi Devi

Overview

Heavy metal contamination in the environment is one of the most endangering pollutants both for human health and the environment. This article presents experimental data on heavy metal contamination in soil, water, and vegetable samples from Patna, India.

Summary

In this article, we discussed the experimental data on the concentration of prominent heavy metals in soil, water, and vegetable matrices from Patna. This article also highlights the bioconcentration factor of heavy metals transfer from soil to vegetables in Patna

Author Comments

Dr Ishwar Chandra Yadav, PhD
Dr Ishwar Chandra Yadav, PhD
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Research Scientist
Biogeochemsitry
Tokyo, Japan | Japan
This is good data article on heavy metal contaminationDr Ishwar Chandra Yadav, PhD

Dataset on assessment of heavy metals contamination in multi-environmental samples from Patna, India.

Authors:
Dr Ishwar Chandra Yadav, PhD
Dr Ishwar Chandra Yadav, PhD
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Research Scientist
Biogeochemsitry
Tokyo, Japan | Japan

Data Brief 2019 Aug 31;25:104079. Epub 2019 May 31.

Department of Environmental Science, Central University of South Bihar, SH-7, Gaya-Panchanpur Road District-Gaya 824236, Bihar, India.

Accumulation of heavy metals in vegetables adversely affects the well-being of human health. In this study, we investigated the heavy metals (Hg, Zn, Cu, Pb and Mn) contamination in different environmental samples collected from five major sites (Gaighat, Paijawa, Danapur, Ranipur and Marchi) of Patna. In all the samples concentration of manganese (Mn) was found to be higher in soil samples. The concentration of heavy metals in soil samples were in the order Mn > Zn > Cu > Pb > Hg in water sample; Mn > Zn > Pb > Cu > Hg, and in vegetables Mn > Zn > Cu > Pb > Hg. In all sites, majority of heavy metal were within the permissible limits except the Zn and Pb. The Zn and Pb contents in vegetables and soil were measured above the permissible limit recommended by WHO/FAO (2007) and Indian standard. The bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for the heavy metal transfer from soils to vegetables are analysed and were ranked in the order of Hg > Pb > Zn > Cu > Mn. The estimated daily intake of metals suggested low health risk despite higher metal content in soil/vegetables. The metal pollution index (MPI) analysis showed high MPI for spinach (15.6) followed by red spinach (14.0) whereas beans (8.6) showed lower metal pollution index.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2019.104079DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6586951PMC
August 2019

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