Optimal dilation time for combined small endoscopic sphincterotomy and balloon dilation for common bile duct stones: a multicentre, single-blinded, randomised controlled trial.

Authors:
Wenbo Meng
Wenbo Meng
The First Hospital of Lanzhou University
China
Joseph W Leung
Joseph W Leung
University of California
United States
Kai Zhang
Kai Zhang
State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition
China
Wence Zhou
Wence Zhou
The First Hospital of Lanzhou University
China
Zhenyu Wang
Zhenyu Wang
School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
Berkeley | United States
Leida Zhang
Leida Zhang
Third Military Medical University
China
Hao Sun
Hao Sun
Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences
Hong Kong
Ping Xue
Ping Xue
Sichuan University
China

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol 2019 Jun 16;4(6):425-434. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Fifth Department of General Surgery, The First Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China; Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery Institute of Gansu Province, Clinical Medical College Cancer Center of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China; Key Laboratory of Biological Therapy and Regenerative Medicine Transformation Gansu Province, Lanzhou, China. Electronic address:

Background: Endoscopic sphincterotomy is the established treatment for common bile duct stones. Balloon dilation offers an alternative. Prolonged dilation (300 s) with a 10 mm diameter balloon decreases the occurrence of pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We aimed to determine the optimal duration of dilation for combined endoscopic sphincterotomy and balloon dilation for the removal of common bile duct stones.

Methods: We did a multicentre, single-blinded, randomised controlled trial at 15 tertiary surgical centres in China. Eligible patients (≥18 years) with native papilla and common bile duct stones (≤1·5 cm in size and <2 cm in diameter) undergoing ERCP were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1:1) to receive balloon dilation for 0, 30, 60, 180, or 300 s after deep bile duct cannulation. Randomisation was done by an independent statistician using a computer-generated randomisation list with a block size of ten, stratified by centre. Patients and outcome assessors, but not endoscopists and investigators, were masked to treatment allocation. Balloon dilation was done with controlled radial expansion balloons according to common bile duct stone size. Stones were removed using stone retrieval balloons or baskets. The primary endpoint was overall frequency of post-ERCP pancreatitis. The primary efficacy analysis and safety analyses were done in the modified intention-to-treat population, which included all randomly assigned patients with successful cannulation, but excluded those who withdrew consent after randomisation. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02510495, and is complete.

Findings: Between July 29, 2015, and Dec 1, 2017, 3721 consecutive patients with common bile duct stones were recruited, 1718 of whom were excluded. The remaining 2003 patients underwent a small (3-5 mm) endoscopic sphincterotomy. 83 patients withdrew consent after the ERCP procedure, thus 1920 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis (0 s [n=371], 30 s [n=384], 60 s [n=388], 180 s [n=390], and 300 s [n=387]). Overall, post-ERCP pancreatitis occurred in 199 (10%) of 1920 patients (44 [12%] patients in the 0 s group, 28 [7%] in the 30 s group, 32 [8%] in the 60 s group, 36 [9%] in the 180 s group, and 59 [15%] in the 300 s group). Prolonged dilation (300 s) significantly increased the occurrence of post-ERCP pancreatitis compared with shorter balloon dilation (p=0·002). The frequency of post-ERCP pancreatitis was significantly lower in the 30, 60, and 180 s groups than in the 300 s group (relative risk [RR] 0·48, 95% CI 0·31-0·73; p=0·0005 vs the 30 s group; 0·54, 0·36-0·81; p=0·003 vs the 60 s group; 0·61, 0·41-0·89; p=0·01 vs the 180 s group). The frequency of post-ERCP pancreatitis was significantly higher in the 0 s group than the 30 s group (RR 1·62, 1·04-2·56; p=0·03). No difference in stone extraction (all ≥90%) was observed between groups. Following ERCP, 90 (5%) of 1920 patients had acute cholangitis, 14 (<1%) had acute cholecystitis, and five (<1%) had gastrointestinal bleeding, with no significant differences between groups. One (<1%) patient had Stapfer II perforation, which resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment.

Interpretation: A balloon dilation time of 30 s for combined endoscopic sphincterotomy and balloon dilation reduced the frequency of post-ERCP pancreatitis and was determined to be the optimum dilation time for the removal of common bile duct stones.

Funding: National Natural Science Foundation of China, Gansu Competitive Foundation Projects for Technology Development and Innovation.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-1253(19)30075-5DOI Listing
June 2019
2 Reads

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

bile duct
16
common bile
16
balloon dilation
12
duct stones
12
endoscopic sphincterotomy
12
multicentre single-blinded
8
single-blinded randomised
8
controlled trial
8
randomised controlled
8
sphincterotomy balloon
8
dilation
5
determine optimal
4
optimal duration
4
duration dilation
4
aimed determine
4
ercp aimed
4
balloon decreases
4
300 diameter
4
dilation 300
4
prolonged dilation
4

Similar Publications