Population density is beneficially associated with 12-year diabetes risk marker change among residents of lower socio-economic neighborhoods.

Authors:
David Dunstan
David Dunstan
School of Population Health
Australia
Ester Cerin
Ester Cerin
Institute of Human Performance
Hong Kong
Mohammad Javad Koohsari
Mohammad Javad Koohsari
University of Melbourne
Australia
Takemi Sugiyama
Takemi Sugiyama
School of Population Health
Australia
Neville Owen
Neville Owen
School of Population Health
Australia

Health Place 2019 Apr 16;57:74-81. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia; Swinburne University of Technology, John Street, Hawthorne, VIC 3122, Hawthorn, Australia.

We examined associations of neighborhood population density with 12-year changes in diabetes risk (post-challenge plasma glucose), and potential moderation by neighborhood socio-economic status (SES) among 4,816 Australians. In lower SES neighborhoods, post-challenge plasma glucose increased by 6% in low-density, remained stable in medium-density and decreased by 3% in high-density neighborhoods. In medium SES neighborhoods, glucose remained stable in high-density, but increased by 2% and 3% in medium- and low-density neighborhoods, respectively. In higher SES neighborhoods, no significant interaction effect between time and density was observed. Densification may make protective contributions for diabetes risk in lower and medium SES neighborhoods.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2019.02.006DOI Listing
April 2019

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