The circadian clock gene is required to control the timing of retinal neurogenesis and lamination of Müller glia in the mouse retina.

Authors:
Onkar B Sawant
Onkar B Sawant
Texas A&M University
United States
Minzhong Yu
Minzhong Yu
University Hospitals
Director of Ophthalmic Electrophysiology Laboratory
electrophysiology, cell biology
Cleveland, OH | United States
Neal S Peachey
Neal S Peachey
Cole Eye Institute
United States
Sujata Rao
Sujata Rao
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
United States

FASEB J 2019 Apr 19:fj201801832RR. Epub 2019 Apr 19.

Department of Ophthalmic Research, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

A single pool of multipotent retinal progenitor cells give rise to the diverse cell types within the mammalian retina. Such cellular diversity is due to precise control of various cellular processes like cell specification, proliferation, differentiation, and maturation. Circadian clock genes can control the expression of key regulators of cell cycle progression and therefore can synchronize the cell cycle state of a heterogeneous population of cells. Here we show that the protein encoded by the circadian clock gene brain and muscle arnt-like protein-1 () is expressed in the embryonic retina and is required to regulate the timing of cell cycle exit. Accordingly, loss of during retinal neurogenesis results in increased S-phase entry and delayed cell cycle exit. Disruption in cell cycle kinetics affects the timely generation of the appropriate neuronal population thus leading to an overall decrease in the number of retinal ganglion cells, amacrine cells, and an increase in the number of the late-born type II cone bipolar cells as well as the Müller glia. Additionally, the mislocalized Müller cells are observed in the photoreceptor layer in the conditional mutants. These changes affect the functional integrity of the visual circuitry as we report a significant delay in visual evoked potential implicit time in the retina-specific null animals. Our results demonstrate that is required to maintain the balance between the neural and glial cells in the embryonic retina by coordinating the timing of cell cycle entry and exit. Thus, plays an essential role during retinal neurogenesis affecting both development and function of the mature retina.-Sawant, O. B., Jidigam, V. K., Fuller, R. D., Zucaro, O. F., Kpegba, C., Yu, M., Peachey, N. S., Rao, S. The circadian clock gene is required to control the timing of retinal neurogenesis and lamination of Müller glia in the mouse retina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.201801832RRDOI Listing
April 2019
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