Associations between fatigue, sleep disturbance and eating style in adults with type 2 diabetes: A correlational study.

Authors:
Bingqian Zhu
Bingqian Zhu
College of Nursing
Pamela Martyn-Nemeth
Pamela Martyn-Nemeth
College of Nursing
United States
Laurie Ruggiero
Laurie Ruggiero
University of Rhode Island
United States
Chang G Park
Chang G Park
College of Nursing
United States
Yaqing Zhang
Yaqing Zhang
State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology
Cynthia Fritschi
Cynthia Fritschi
University of Illinois at Chicago
United States

J Clin Nurs 2019 Apr 19. Epub 2019 Apr 19.

College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Aims And Objectives: To test the hypothesis that fatigue and sleep disturbance account for a significant amount of variation in eating styles among people with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Background: Healthy eating is an important component of diabetes self-care but remains a major challenge. In people with T2D, symptoms of fatigue and sleep disturbance are pervasive. However, there is limited understanding of whether fatigue and sleep disturbance is associated with eating style in people with T2D.

Design: Correlational design.

Methods: This study was reported following the STROBE checklist. Data were collected between February 2017 and January 2018. A convenience sample of 64 T2D adults completed the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18V2 to measure eating style (e.g., emotional eating, cognitive restraint, and uncontrolled eating). Diabetes distress, fatigue, and sleep disturbance were measured using validated questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed.

Results: Only age was a significant predictor (β = -0.344) of cognitive restraint. Participant demographics, psychological factor, and health-related factors contribute significantly to the model predicting emotional eating, but only diabetes distress was a significant predictor (β = 0.433). Introducing fatigue and poor sleep quality explained an additional 12.0% of the variation in emotional eating. The final model explained 24.9% of the variation in emotional eating; both diabetes distress (β = 0.294) and fatigue (β = 0.360) were significant predictors.

Conclusion: There is a strong, independent relationship of fatigue and diabetes distress with emotional eating T2D patients. The effect of improving fatigue and diabetes distress on eating style should be explored.

Relevance To Clinical Practice: In clinical practice, nurses are recommended to include a detailed assessment of fatigue and distress in patients with diabetes. Additional to the conventional nutrition therapy focusing on diet advice, eating style should also be incorporated in diet education by diabetes nurses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14883DOI Listing
April 2019
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