Postpartum Depressive Disorder - Psychosomatic Aspects.

Authors:
Tanja Fehm
Tanja Fehm
University of Tuebingen
Germany
Gabriele Bizjak
Gabriele Bizjak
University of Bonn
Germany
Percy Balan
Percy Balan
Institute for Transplantation Diagnostics and Cell Therapeutics
Germany
Matthias Franz
Matthias Franz
Klinisches Institut für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie der Heinrich-Heine-Universität
Germany

Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd 2019 Apr 12;79(4):375-381. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Clinical Institute for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common mental illness in mothers following the birth of a child. Since the symptoms of PPD are similar to the normal stress of healthy women following childbirth, it is often difficult for the attending gynaecologist or midwife to diagnose this illness in a timely manner and thus initiate adequate treatment and comprehensive support for the patient. Even if there are options for a screening using evaluated questionnaires and subsequent psychotherapy and/or drug therapy in the treatment of PPD which has proven effective, it is seen that, in most treatment approaches, little consideration is given to the affect-controlled interaction and the bonding behaviour between mother and child. This article presents diagnostic measures and current therapeutic approaches as well as their integration in practice in order to achieve awareness of this topic in everyday clinical practice and show the pathways of appropriate treatment. Specific multiprofessional treatment approaches which centre on the mother-child relationship demonstrate successes with regard to depression in the mothers and also on the development of a secure mother-child bond and are thus a protective factor in the development of the affected children. The now well-known effects of PPD on the fathers as well as the negative impacts of paternal depression on child development make it clear that the treatment should not focus solely on maternal depression, but also always on the family bond between the mother, child and father in the treatment.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-0759-1981DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6461464PMC
April 2019
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