Racial/ethnic differences in experimental pain sensitivity and associated factors - Cardiovascular responsiveness and psychological status.

Authors:
Hee Jun Kim
Hee Jun Kim
Hallym University College of Medicine
Richard Ohrbach
Richard Ohrbach
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
United States
Roger B Fillingim
Roger B Fillingim
University of Florida
Gainesville | United States
William Maixner
William Maixner
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
United States
Cynthia L Renn
Cynthia L Renn
University of Maryland
United States
Meg Johantgen
Meg Johantgen
University of Maryland School of Nursing
Shijun Zhu
Shijun Zhu
University of Maryland School of Nursing
United States

PLoS One 2019 18;14(4):e0215534. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Department of Pain and Translational Symptom Science, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.

This study evaluated the contributions of psychological status and cardiovascular responsiveness to racial/ethnic differences in experimental pain sensitivity. The baseline measures of 3,159 healthy individuals-non-Hispanic white (NHW): 1,637, African-American (AA): 1,012, Asian: 299, and Hispanic: 211-from the OPPERA prospective cohort study were used. Cardiovascular responsiveness measures and psychological status were included in structural equation modeling based mediation analyses. Pain catastrophizing was a significant mediator for the associations between race/ethnicity and heat pain tolerance, heat pain ratings, heat pain aftersensations, mechanical cutaneous pain ratings and aftersensations, and mechanical cutaneous pain temporal summation for both Asians and AAs compared to NHWs. HR/MAP index showed a significant inconsistent (mitigating) mediating effect on the association between race/ethnicity (AAs vs. NHWs) and heat pain tolerance. Similarly, coping inconsistently mediated the association between race/ethnicity and mechanical cutaneous pain temporal summation in both AAs and Asians, compared to NHWs. The factor encompassing depression, anxiety, and stress was a significant mediator for the associations between race/ethnicity (Asians vs. NHWs) and heat pain aftersensations. Thus, while pain catastrophizing mediated racial/ethnic differences in many of the QST measures, the psychological and cardiovascular mediators were distinctly restrictive, signifying multiple independent mechanisms in racial/ethnic differences in pain.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0215534PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6472780PMC
April 2019
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