Air pollution survey across the western Mediterranean Sea: overview on oxygenated volatile hydrocarbons (OVOCs) and other gaseous pollutants.

Authors:
Francesca Vichi
Francesca Vichi
S. Maria Annunziata Hospital
Andrea Imperiali
Andrea Imperiali
Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research
Massimiliano Frattoni
Massimiliano Frattoni
University of Science and Technology Houari Boumediene
Algeria
Mattia Perilli
Mattia Perilli
Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IIA)
Italy
Paolo Benedetti
Paolo Benedetti
San Bortolo Hospital
Italy
Angelo Cecinato
Angelo Cecinato
Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research
Italy

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2019 Jun 17;26(16):16781-16799. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research (CNR.IIA), Monterotondo, RM, Italy.

Despite the Mediterranean Sea basin is among the most sensitive areas over the world for climate change and air quality issues, it still remains less studied than the oceanic regions. The domain investigated by the research ship Minerva Uno cruise in Summer 2015 was the Tyrrhenian Sea. An overview on the marine boundary layer (MBL) concentration levels of carbonyl compounds, ozone (O), and sulfur dioxide (SO) is reported. The north-western Tyrrhenian Sea samples showed a statistically significant difference in acetone and SO concentrations when compared to the south-eastern ones. Acetone and SO values were higher in the southern part of the basin; presumably, a blend of natural (including volcanism) and anthropogenic (shipping) sources caused this difference. The mean acetone concentration reached 5.4 μg/m; formaldehyde and acetaldehyde means were equal to 1.1 μg/m and 0.38 μg/m, respectively. Maximums of 3.0 μg/m for formaldehyde and 1.0 μg/m for acetaldehyde were detected along the route from Civitavecchia to Fiumicino. These two compounds were also present at levels above the average in proximity of petrol-refining plants on the coast; in fact, formaldehyde reached 1.56 μg/m and 1.60 μg/m, respectively, near Milazzo and Augusta harbors; meanwhile, acetaldehyde was as high as 0.75 μg/m at both sites. The levels of formaldehyde agreed with previously reported measurements over Mediterranean Sea and elsewhere; besides, a day/night trend was observed, confirming the importance of photochemical formation for this pollutant. According to this study, Mediterranean Sea basin, which is a closed sea, was confirmed to suffer a high anthropic pressure impacting with diffuse emissions, while natural contribution to pollution could come from volcanic activity, particularly in the south-eastern Tyrrhenian Sea region.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11356-019-04916-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-019-04916-6DOI Listing
June 2019
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