Decision-making in livestock biosecurity practices amidst environmental and social uncertainty: Evidence from an experimental game.

Authors:
Christopher J Koliba
Christopher J Koliba
University of Vermont
Waco | United States
Susan M Moegenburg
Susan M Moegenburg
University of Vermont
Asim Zia
Asim Zia
University of Vermont
Jason Parker
Jason Parker
National Institutes of Health
Lobatse | Botswana
Timothy Sellnow
Timothy Sellnow
University of Central Florida
Orlando | United States
Serge Wiltshire
Serge Wiltshire
University of Vermont
Gabriela Bucini
Gabriela Bucini
Colorado State University
United States

PLoS One 2019 17;14(4):e0214500. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, United States of America.

Livestock industries are vulnerable to disease threats, which can cost billions of dollars and have substantial negative social ramifications. Losses are mitigated through increased use of disease-related biosecurity practices, making increased biosecurity an industry goal. Currently, there is no industry-wide standard for sharing information about disease incidence or on-site biosecurity strategies, resulting in uncertainty regarding disease prevalence and biosecurity strategies employed by industry stakeholders. Using an experimental simulation game, with primarily student participants, we examined willingness to invest in biosecurity when confronted with disease outbreak scenarios. We varied the scenarios by changing the information provided about 1) disease incidence and 2) biosecurity strategy or response by production facilities to the threat of disease. Here we show that willingness to invest in biosecurity increases with increased information about disease incidence, but decreases with increased information about biosecurity practices used by nearby facilities. Thus, the type or context of the uncertainty confronting the decision maker may be a major factor influencing behavior. Our findings suggest that policies and practices that encourage greater sharing of disease incidence information should have the greatest benefit for protecting herd health.

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Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0214500PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469775PMC
April 2019

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(Supplied by CrossRef)
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