Frequency of Bleeding Complications After Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsy and the Association With Aspirin Usage and Length of Aspirin Discontinuation.

Authors:
Theodora A Potretzke
Theodora A Potretzke
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jamison A Harvey
Jamison A Harvey
Laboratory for Translational Anatomy of Degenerative Diseases and Developmental Disorders (TAD4)
Tina M Gunderson
Tina M Gunderson
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics
Grant D Schmit
Grant D Schmit
Mayo Clinic
Rochester | United States
Robert D McBane
Robert D McBane
Mayo Clinic
United States
Paul W Wennberg
Paul W Wennberg
Mayo Clinic
United States

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2019 Apr 17:1-5. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

1 Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Ave SW, Rochester, MN 55905.

The purpose of this study is to report the frequency of major bleeding after percutaneous image-guided core biopsy and its association with aspirin usage and duration of prebiopsy aspirin abstinence. A retrospective review of percutaneous image-guided core biopsies performed at our institution between September 1, 2005, and September 1, 2016, was performed ( = 30,966). Patients were excluded if aspirin usage data were missing ( = 633). Bleeding complications were defined using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and were considered significant if they were grade 3 or higher. Multivariate models were adjusted for age, sex, platelet count, international normalized ratio, and biopsy target. Three categorizations of aspirin use were examined: any use within 10 days before biopsy, duration of abstinence (> 10 days or no aspirin, 8-10 days, 4-7 days, and 0-3 days before biopsy), and use on the day of biopsy. Associations with bleeding complications were modeled using logistic regression models. A < 0.05 was considered significant. The study included 30,333 biopsies in 21,938 subjects (57% male; median age, 60 years; interquartile range, 49-70 years). Of the biopsies, 7921 (26.1%) were performed in patients who received aspirin within 10 days of biopsy, and 3761 (47.5%) of those biopsies were performed in patients who took aspirin within 3 days. Ninety-eight (0.32%) significant bleeding complications occurred overall, including 34 (0.43%) in patients who used aspirin within 10 days before biopsy (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.96-2.3; = 0.08). Duration of abstinence was associated with a significantly increased bleeding risk only between 0-3 days versus more than 10 days or no aspirin (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.3-3.6; = 0.004). Aspirin use on the day of biopsy showed the greatest increase in risk (1.9%; odds ratio, 6.6; 95% CI, 3.8-11.5; < 0.001). Significant bleeding complications after biopsy remain rare even among patients with recent aspirin usage, although shorter duration of prebiopsy abstinence increases bleeding risk, most significantly if aspirin is taken the day of biopsy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.18.20366DOI Listing

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April 2019
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