Morning Surge and Peak Morning Ambulatory Blood Pressure Versus Automated Office Blood Pressure in Predicting Cardiovascular Disease.

Authors:
Emmanuel A Andreadis
Emmanuel A Andreadis
Evangelismos General Hospital
Athina | Greece
Charalampia V Geladari
Charalampia V Geladari
Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Outpatient Center
Epameinondas T Angelopoulos
Epameinondas T Angelopoulos
Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Outpatient Center
George N Kolyvas
George N Kolyvas
Evangelismos General Hospital
Greece
Vasilios Papademetriou
Vasilios Papademetriou
Hippokration Hospital
Greece

High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev 2019 Jun 15;26(3):209-215. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Cardiology, Georgetown University and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Athens, Greece.

Introduction: Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) has been recently shown to predict equally well to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), conventional office blood pressure (OBP) and home blood pressure (HBP), cardiovascular (CV) events among hypertensives.

Aim: To compare AOBP recording and ABP monitoring in order to evaluate morning blood pressure (BP) peak in predicting CV events and deaths in hypertensives.

Methods: We assessed 236 initially untreated hypertensives, examined between 2009 and 2013. The end points were CV and non-CV death and any CV event including myocardial infarction, evidence of coronary heart disease, heart failure hospitalization, severe arrhythmia, stroke, and symptomatic peripheral artery disease. We fitted proportional hazards models using the different modalities as predictors and evaluated their predictive performance using two metrics: the Akaike's Information Criterion, and Harrell's C-index.

Results: After a mean follow-up of 7 years, 23 subjects (39% women) had at least one CV event. In Cox regression models, systolic conventional OBP, AOBP and peak morning BP were predictive of CV events (p < 0.05). The Akaike Information Criterion showed smaller values for AOBP than peak morning BP, indicating a better performance in predicting CV events (227.2736 and 238.7413, respectively). The C-index was 0.6563 for systolic AOBP and 0.6243 for peak morning BP indicating a better predicting ability for AOBP.

Conclusion: In initially untreated hypertensives, AOBP appears to be at least equally reliable to 24-h monitoring in the evaluation of morning BP peak in order to detect CV disease whereas the sleep-trough and preawakening morning BP surge did not indicate such an effect.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s40292-019-00315-7
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40292-019-00315-7DOI Listing

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June 2019
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