Implementation and evaluation of a quality and safety tool for ambulatory strongyloidiasis patients at high risk of adverse outcome.

Authors:
Omar Mourad
Omar Mourad
Fluminense Federal University - School of Medicine
Brazil
Michael Klowak
Michael Klowak
McMaster University
Adrienne J Showler
Adrienne J Showler
University of Toronto
United States
Stefanie Klowak
Stefanie Klowak
UHN-Toronto General Hospital
Andrea K Boggild
Andrea K Boggild
University of Toronto
Toronto | Canada

Trop Dis Travel Med Vaccines 2019 3;5. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

1University of Toronto, 27 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S1A1 Canada.

Background: Strongyloidiasis is a common infection in Canadian migrants that can cause life-threatening hyperinfection in immunosuppressed hosts. We designed and implemented a safety tool to guide management of patients with in order to prevent adverse outcomes. Methods: Patients treated at our centre for strongyloidiasis from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015 were identified through our ivermectin access log. Patients were categorized into pre-implementation and post-implementation groups. A retrospective chart review for predefined variables was conducted.

Results: Of 37 patients with strongyloidiasis, 26 were in the pre-implementation group and 11 were in the post-implementation group. Documented seroreversion (positive to negative) occurred in 42.1% of patients pre-implementation and 62.5% of patients post-implementation ( = 0.420). Documented stool clearance occurred in 80.0% of patients pre-implementation and 100.0% of patients post-implementation ( = 1.000). More patients were screened for HTLV-1 coinfection post-implementation (80.0%) versus pre-implementation (30.8%) ( = 0.011). Loss to follow-up after treatment occurred in 23.1% of patients pre-implementation and 20.0% of patients post-implementation ( = 1.000).

Conclusions: The safety tool may be useful in the treatment of patients with strongyloidiasis to improve documentation of patient outcomes and standardize care. Future research should include a powered prospective study.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40794-019-0080-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448213PMC
April 2019
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