Engaging Learners Through Modules in Quality Improvement and Patient Safety.

MedEdPORTAL 2016 Oct 13;12:10482. Epub 2016 Oct 13.

Assistant Professor and Hospitalist, Departments of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine.

Introduction: Residents are on the front lines of medical care in academic institutions. Their daily interactions are crucial to the quality of care received by patients in these settings, and thus, knowledge of patient safety and quality improvement is essential. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires all residents to participate in quality improvement and patient safety programs as part of their residency training. To meet this need, we developed a curriculum in patient safety and quality improvement for pediatric residents.

Methods: This curriculum describes four short modules focused on quality improvement, patient safety, evidence-based practice, and other quality improvement-related topics. These modules can be given during one rotation, throughout residency, or partnered with a practical application, such as a project. A 17-question quality improvement and patient safety knowledge test was developed after an extensive literature review to reflect module goals and objectives. A validated, 12-question attitudes survey was administered before and after the modules.

Results: Of the 57 eligible residents, 42 completed the knowledge pretest, and 20 completed the posttest. Mean posttest results (M = 91.00 [± 9.12]) were considerably higher than mean pretest scores (M = 75.24 [± 11.74]) when utilizing the independent t test (p < .001). Of the 57 eligible residents, 11 completed the attitude presurvey, and 13 completed the attitude postsurvey. Median responses from the survey mostly fell within the 2-3 range of slightly to moderately comfortable. Significant differences showing improvement between presurvey and postsurvey time frames were found in identifying and comparing best practices (p = .02), using the PDSA model (p = .002), and identifying how data are linked (p = .001).

Discussion: Knowledge and perception surveys suggest that resident knowledge and attitudes statistically improved, and faculty and residents participated in even more quality improvement initiatives after completing the curriculum.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10482DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440404PMC

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October 2016

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