Comparing birth experience and birth outcome of vaginal births between induced and spontaneous onset of labour: a prospective study.

Authors:
Nora K Schaal
Nora K Schaal
Heinrich-Heine-University
Tanja Fehm
Tanja Fehm
University of Tuebingen
Germany
Martin Heil
Martin Heil
Heinrich-Heine-University
Germany
Anya Pedersen
Anya Pedersen
University of Muenster
Markus Fleisch
Markus Fleisch
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Philip Hepp
Philip Hepp
University Hospital
Germany

Arch Gynecol Obstet 2019 Jul 11;300(1):41-47. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, HELIOS University Hospital Wuppertal, University Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal, Germany.

Purpose: In developed countries, around 25% of all births involve labour induction. Studies have indicated that labour induction negatively influences the birth experience as well as the birth process. However, the impact of labour induction when only considering vaginal deliveries has not been studied yet, which was the purpose of the present study.

Methods: 186 women who gave birth vaginally took part in this prospective study. 95 women gave birth after spontaneous onset of labour (SL-group) and 91 women received a labour induction (LI-group). Eight to 72 h after birth, the women filled in the revised version of the standardised Childbirth Experience Questionnaire, which examines the birth experience in four dimensions (Own Capacity, Perceived Safety, Participation and Professional Support). Medical details regarding birth and fetal outcomes were taken from the medical records.

Results: Birth outcomes (the number of epidural anaesthesia, the duration of birth, birth risks and childbirth injuries) as well as fetal outcomes (APGAR after 1 and 5 min and arterial cord pH) did not differ between the groups. Regarding the subjective birth experience, the LI-group indicated significantly lower values for Perceived Safety and Participation compared to the SL-group, while there were no differences for the dimensions Own Capacity and Professional Support.

Discussion: Successful labour induction resulting in a vaginal birth did not negatively influence birth and fetal outcomes and only partly affected the women's birth experience. The negative impact of labour induction on the dimensions Perceived Safety and Participation should sensitize midwives in order to provide optimal support.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-019-05150-8DOI Listing
July 2019
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