Antibiotic prescription among outpatients in a prefecture of Japan, 2012-2013: a retrospective claims database study.

Authors:
Hideki Hashimoto
Hideki Hashimoto
School of Public Health
New Haven | United States
Hiroki Matsui
Hiroki Matsui
Mie University
Japan
Yusuke Sasabuchi
Yusuke Sasabuchi
Jichi Medical University
Japan
Hideo Yasunaga
Hideo Yasunaga
Graduate School of Medicine
Japan
Kazuhiko Kotani
Kazuhiko Kotani
Jichi Medical University
Japan
Ryozo Nagai
Ryozo Nagai
Jichi Medical University
Japan
Shuji Hatakeyama
Shuji Hatakeyama
Graduate School of Medicine
Japan

BMJ Open 2019 Apr 3;9(4):e026251. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Division of General Internal Medicine, Jichi Medical University Hospital, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan.

Objectives: To investigate oral antibiotic prescribing patterns and identify factors associated with antibiotic prescriptions, with the aim of guiding future interventions to reduce inappropriate prescribing.

Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Setting: Database of public health insurance claims in Kumamoto prefecture (Japan).

Participants: Beneficiaries of the national or late elders' health insurance system between April 2012 and March 2013.

Main Outcome Measures: Of the 7 770 481 outpatient visits, 682 822 had a code for antibiotics (860 antibiotic prescriptions per 1000 population). Third-generation cephalosporins (35%), macrolides (32%) and quinolones (21%) were the most frequently prescribed. Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs), including viral upper respiratory infections (URI) (22%), pharyngitis (18%), bronchitis (11%) and sinusitis (10%) were the most frequently diagnosed for antibiotic prescribing, followed by gastrointestinal (9%), urinary tract (8%) and skin, cutaneous and mucosal infections (5%). Antibiotic prescribing rates for viral URI, pharyngitis, bronchitis, sinusitis and gastrointestinal infections were 35%, 54%, 53%, 57% and 30%, respectively. In multivariable analysis for ARTIs and gastrointestinal infections, patient age (10-19 years especially), patient sex (male) and facility scale (free-standing clinics or small-scale hospital-based clinics) were associated with increased antibiotic prescribing.

Conclusions: Broad-spectrum antibiotics constituted 88% of oral outpatient antibiotic prescriptions. Approximately 70% of antibiotics were prescribed for ARTIs and gastroenteritis with modest benefit from antibiotic treatment. The quality of antibiotic prescribing needs to be improved. Antimicrobial stewardship interventions should target ARTIs and gastroenteritis, as well as young patients and small-scale institutions.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6500307PMC
April 2019
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