Bacterial sexually transmitted infections.

Authors:
Thomas Meyer
Thomas Meyer
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
United States
Viviane Bremer
Viviane Bremer
Robert Koch Institute
Germany
Adriane Skaletz-Rorowski
Adriane Skaletz-Rorowski
University of Münster
Germany
Norbert Brockmeyer
Norbert Brockmeyer
Ruhr-University Bochum

J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 2019 Mar;17(3):287-315

WIR "Walk In Ruhr", competence network HIV/AIDS, Center for Sexual Health and Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany.

Worldwide, the incidence of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) has shown a significant increase in recent years. In Germany, this circumstance is reflected by a rise in the number of reported syphilis cases. There has also been an uptick in the incidence of non-notifiable STIs such as gonorrhea and infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium. A key factor in the spread of these infections is their varied clinical presentation, which includes urogenital, pharyngeal and rectal involvement as well as a large number of asymptomatic cases. New real-time multiplex PCR methods allow for rapid and targeted detection of STI pathogens. The most common bacterial STI is urogenital chlamydial infection caused by serovars D-K, which affects young adults in particular. Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) caused by L serovars often presents as chlamydial proctitis. In recent years, Neisseria (N.) gonorrhoeae has shown a significant development of resistance, with high-level monoresistance and multiresistance to antibiotics commonly used for treatment. It is therefore imperative that sensitivity testing of N. gonorrhoeae be performed in addition to nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). Increased drug resistance has also been observed for Mycoplasma genitalium, a fact that complicates treatment.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ddg.13804DOI Listing
March 2019
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