Sexually transmitted infections and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: results from the Nurses' Health Studies.

Authors:
Kathryn L Terry
Kathryn L Terry
Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center
United States
Noemi Bender
Noemi Bender
University Medical Center Freiburg
Germany
Nicole Brenner
Nicole Brenner
Charles Darwin University
Australia
Tim Waterboer
Tim Waterboer
Queensland Institute of Medical Research
Australia
Shelley S Tworoger
Shelley S Tworoger
Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School
Boston | United States

Br J Cancer 2019 Apr 21;120(8):855-860. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are associated with pelvic inflammatory disease and tubal pathologies. Given the tubal origin of a proportion of ovarian cancers, STIs may be relevant in their aetiology.

Methods: Antibodies indicating past infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, herpes simplex virus type 2, and against human papillomavirus oncogenes (L1 and E6+E7 oncoproteins of types 16, 18, 45) were measured in prediagnosis plasma samples in a nested case-control study in the Nurses' Health Studies (n = 337 cases 1:1 matched to controls). Logistic regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals [CIs] comparing women seropositive vs. seronegative among all cases (invasive and borderline), invasive (n = 257), and invasive serous ovarian cancers; n = 170), and borderline ovarian tumours (n = 80).

Results: C. trachomatis seropositivity was associated with higher risk of ovarian cancer overall (RR = 2.07 [1.25-3.43]); results were similar for invasive, invasive serous, and borderline tumours. We observed no associations for the other STIs. Relative to women seronegative to all infections, strongest associations were observed for seropositivity to C. trachomatis plus another STI (2.74 [1.20-6.27]; C. trachomatis alone, 1.88 [1.03-3.42]; all cases); however, the RRs were not significantly different.

Conclusions: C. trachomatis infection may increase ovarian cancer risk; additional studies are required.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-019-0422-9DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

ovarian cancer
12
ovarian cancers
8
health studies
8
invasive serous
8
transmitted infections
8
sexually transmitted
8
nurses' health
8
ovarian
6
invasive
5
seropositive seronegative
4
women seropositive
4
invasive n = 257
4
borderline invasive
4
invasive borderline
4
seronegative cases
4
cases invasive
4
cancers n = 170
4
tumours n = 80results
4
trachomatis
4
n = 80results trachomatis
4

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Article in Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol.
CL Haggerty et al.
Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 2011
Article in J. Infect. Dis.
HC Wiesenfeld et al.
J. Infect. Dis. 2017
Article in Int. J. STD AIDS
S Barrett et al.
Int. J. STD AIDS 2005
Article in Cancer Causes Control
Z Zhou et al.
Cancer Causes Control 2017
Article in Ann. Oncol.
RJ Kurman et al.
Ann. Oncol. 2013
Article in Nat. Commun.
SI Labidi-Galy et al.
Nat. Commun. 2017
Article in Clin. Adv. Hematol. Oncol.
AA Tone et al.
Clin. Adv. Hematol. Oncol. 2012
Article in Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol.
A Idahl et al.
Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 2011
Article in J. Infect. Dis.
RB Ness et al.
J. Infect. Dis. 2003
Article in Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol.
RB Ness et al.
Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 2008
Article in Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol.
A Wong et al.
Eur. J. Gynaecol. Oncol. 2007

Similar Publications