Serious adverse events in African-American cancer patients with sickle cell trait and inherited haemoglobinopathies in a SEER-Medicare claims cohort.

Authors:
Biree Andemariam
Biree Andemariam
University of Connecticut Health Center
United States
Xiaoyan Wang
Xiaoyan Wang
University of California
Berkeley | United States
David I Gregorio
David I Gregorio
University of Connecticut School of Medicine
Farmington | United States
Beth A Jones
Beth A Jones
Yale University School of Medicine
United States
Jonathan Sporn
Jonathan Sporn
Pfizer Inc.
Andrew L Salner
Andrew L Salner
Bridgeport Hospital
United States
Helen Swede
Helen Swede
Roswell Park Cancer Institute
United States

Br J Cancer 2019 Apr 20;120(8):861-863. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Community Medicine and Health Care, UConn School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.

African-American (AA) cancer patients have long-experienced worse outcomes compared to non-Hispanic whites (NHW). No studies to date have evaluated the prognostic impact of sickle cell trait (SCT) and other inherited haemoglobinopathies, of which several are disproportionately high in the AA population. In a cohort analysis of treated patients diagnosed with breast or prostate cancer in the linked SEER-Medicare database, the relative risk (RR) for ≥1 serious adverse events (AEs), defined as hospitalisations or emergency department visits, was estimated for 371 AA patients with a haemoglobinopathy (AA+) compared to patients without haemoglobinopathies (17,303 AA-; 144,863 NHW-). AA+ patients had significantly increased risk for ≥1 AEs compared to AA- (RR = 1.19; 95% CI 1.11-1.27) and NHW- (RR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.15-1.31) patients. The magnitude of effect was similar by cancer type, and in analyses of AA+ with SCT only. Our findings suggest a novel hypothesis for disparities in cancer outcomes.

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Source
http://www.nature.com/articles/s41416-019-0416-7
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-019-0416-7DOI Listing
April 2019
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