The influence of number of syllables on word skipping during reading revisited.

Authors:
Denis Drieghe
Denis Drieghe
Ghent University
Belgium
Aaron Veldre
Aaron Veldre
School of Psychology
Gemma Fitzsimmons
Gemma Fitzsimmons
University of Southampton
United Kingdom
Jane Ashby
Jane Ashby
University of Massachusetts
United States
Sally Andrews
Sally Andrews
University of Sydney
Australia

Psychon Bull Rev 2019 Apr;26(2):616-621

University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Fitzsimmons and Drieghe (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 18, 736-741, 2011) showed that a monosyllabic word was skipped more often than a disyllabic word during reading. This finding was interpreted as evidence that syllabic information was extracted from the parafovea early enough to influence word skipping. In the present, large-scale replication of this study, in which we additionally measured the reading, vocabulary, and spelling abilities of the participants, the effect of number of syllables on word skipping was not significant. Moreover, a Bayesian analysis indicated strong evidence for the absence of the effect. The individual differences analyses replicate previous observations showing that spelling ability uniquely predicts word skipping (but not fixation times) because better spellers skip more often. The results indicate that high-quality lexical representations allow the system to reach an advanced stage in the word-recognition process of the parafoveal word early enough to influence the decision of whether or not to skip the word, but this decision is not influenced by number of syllables.

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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13423-019-01590-0DOI Listing
April 2019

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