A systematic review of scabies transmission models and data to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of scabies interventions.

Authors:
Karen Gardner
Karen Gardner
Australian National University
Australia
Helen Dickinson
Helen Dickinson
University of Birmingham
David G Regan
David G Regan
University of New South Wales
Australia
Rosalie Viney
Rosalie Viney
University of Technology
Australia

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2019 03 8;13(3):e0007182. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Background: Scabies is a common dermatological condition, affecting more than 130 million people at any time. To evaluate and/or predict the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of scabies interventions, disease transmission modelling can be used.

Objective: To review published scabies models and data to inform the design of a comprehensive scabies transmission modelling framework to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of scabies interventions.

Methods: Systematic literature search in PubMed, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library identified scabies studies published since the year 2000. Selected papers included modelling studies and studies on the life cycle of scabies mites, patient quality of life and resource use. Reference lists of reviews were used to identify any papers missed through the search strategy. Strengths and limitations of identified scabies models were evaluated and used to design a modelling framework. Potential model inputs were identified and discussed.

Findings: Four scabies models were published: a Markov decision tree, two compartmental models, and an agent-based, network-dependent Monte Carlo model. None of the models specifically addressed crusted scabies, which is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and increased transmission. There is a lack of reliable, comprehensive information about scabies biology and the impact this disease has on patients and society.

Discussion: Clinicians and health economists working in the field of scabies are encouraged to use the current review to inform disease transmission modelling and economic evaluations on interventions against scabies.

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Source
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007182
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6426261PMC
March 2019
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