Reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use and incidence of melanoma among women in the United States.

Authors:
Grayson M Donley
Grayson M Donley
National Cancer Institute
Wayne T Liu
Wayne T Liu
National Cancer Institute
Ruth M Pfeiffer
Ruth M Pfeiffer
National Cancer Institute
Rockville | United States
Emily C McDonald
Emily C McDonald
National Cancer Institute
Margaret A Tucker
Margaret A Tucker
National Cancer Institute
United States
Elizabeth K Cahoon
Elizabeth K Cahoon
National Cancer Institute
United States

Br J Cancer 2019 Apr 28;120(7):754-760. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD, USA.

Background: Although the photosensitising effects of oestrogens may increase the impact of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on melanoma risk, few prospective studies have comprehensively assessed the association between oestrogen-related factors and melanoma.

Methods: We examined the associations between reproductive factors, exogenous oestrogen use and first primary invasive melanoma among 167 503 non-Hispanic white, postmenopausal women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Satellite-based ambient UVR estimates were linked to geocoded residential locations of participants at study baseline.

Results: Increased risk of melanoma was associated with early age at menarche (≤10 vs ≥15 years: HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.71; P for trend = 0.04) and late age at menopause (≥50 vs <45 years: HR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.13, 1.59; P for trend = 0.001). The relationship between ambient UVR and melanoma risk was highest among women with age at menarche ≤10 years (HR per UVR quartile increase = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.58; P-interaction = 0.02). Melanoma risk was not associated with parity, age at first birth, use of oral contraceptives or use of menopausal hormone therapy.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that increased melanoma risk is associated with early age at menarche and late age at menopause. Effect modification findings support the hypothesis that endogenous oestrogen exposure in childhood increases photocarcinogenicity. Future studies should include information on personal UVR exposure and sun sensitivity.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-019-0411-zDOI Listing
April 2019
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