The immunomodulatory effects of measles-mumps-rubella vaccination on persistence of heterologous vaccine responses.

Authors:
Petra Zimmermann
Petra Zimmermann
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry
Kirsten P Perrett
Kirsten P Perrett
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute and Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
Nigel Curtis
Nigel Curtis
The University of Melbourne
Australia

Immunol Cell Biol 2019 Feb 21. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.

It is proposed that measles-containing vaccines have immunomodulatory effects which include a reduction in all-cause childhood mortality. The antibody response to heterologous vaccines provides a means to explore these immunomodulatory effects. This is the first study to investigate the influence of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine on the persistence of antibodies to a broad range of heterologous infant vaccinations given in the first year of life. In total, 319 children were included in the study. All infants received routine vaccinations at 6 weeks, 4 and 6 months of age. At 12 months of age, 212 children were vaccinated with MMR and Haemophilus influenzae type b-meningococcus C (Hib-MenC) vaccines while the remaining 99 children had not yet received these vaccines. In the MMR/Hib-MenC-vaccinated group, blood was taken 28 ± 14 days after receiving these vaccines. Antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis [pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin], poliomyelitis (type 1, 2, 3) and 13 pneumococcal serotypes were measured. Seroprotection rates and geometric mean antibody concentrations were compared between MMR/MenC-Hib-vaccinated and MMR/MenC-Hib-naïve participants. In the final analysis, 311 children were included. Seroprotection rates were lower in MMR/Hib-MenC-vaccinated children against PT and pneumococcal serotype 19A. After adjustment for prespecified factors, MMR/Hib-MenC-vaccinated infants had significantly higher antibody concentrations against tetanus (likely explained by a boosting effect of the carrier protein, a tetanus toxoid), while for the other vaccine antigens there was no difference in antibody concentrations between the two groups. MMR vaccination given at 12 months of age in a developed country does not significantly influence antibody concentrations to heterologous vaccines received in the first year of life.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imcb.12246DOI Listing
February 2019
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References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Therapeutic outcome of intralesional immunotherapy in cutaneous warts using the mumps, measles, and rubella vaccine: a randomized, placebo‐controlled trial
Awal G et al.
J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 2018

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