Patient preferences when communicating with them about medication adherence

Elizabeth J Unni, Eve Van Wagoner, Olayinka O Shiyanbola

Overview

When faced with the challenge of taking medications as prescribed with a lifelong condition such as diabetes, this study asked the patients what are the strategies they would like to utilize to adhere with their medicines, who do they want to talk to them about medication adherence (source), and when and where the communication should happen (setting).

Summary

With more than 50% of the patients not taking medicines as prescribed, it is important to hear from patients what they think about adherence. When developing adherence interventions, it is important to develop them based on patient input.

Author Comments

Dr Elizabeth J Unni, PhD, MBA, BPharm
Dr Elizabeth J Unni, PhD, MBA, BPharm
Touro College of Pharmacy
Chair & Associate Professor, Social/Behavioural/Administrative Sciences
New York, New York | United States
The study was a focus group interview and the thoughts and opinions patients had were very insightful. Dr Elizabeth J Unni, PhD, MBA, BPharm

Utilizing a 3S (strategies, source and setting) approach to understand the patient's preferences when addressing medication non-adherence in patients with diabetes: a focus group study in a primary outpatient clinic.

Authors:
Dr Elizabeth J Unni, PhD, MBA, BPharm
Dr Elizabeth J Unni, PhD, MBA, BPharm
Touro College of Pharmacy
Chair & Associate Professor, Social/Behavioural/Administrative Sciences
New York, New York | United States

BMJ Open 2019 01 15;9(1):e024789. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Division of Social and Administrative Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

Objective: Non-adherence with diabetes medicines is a challenge. Approximately 54% of patients are non-adherent with their diabetes medicines. The objective of this study was to understand patients' preferences when addressing non-adherence based on the 3S approach-strategies (what approaches can be used in addressing non-adherence), settings (when and where should the intervention happen) and sources (who should provide the intervention).

Design: A focus group research design was used.

Setting: A primary outpatient clinic from an integrated healthcare system in the USA.

Participants: Patients who were non-adherent with diabetes medicines.

Data Collection: The focus group guide was based on the Medication Adherence Reasons Scale, which has 19 reasons identified for non-adherence. For each item in the scale, patients were asked for strategies that can be used in addressing that issue, the setting in which the interventions should be provided and the source to provide the interventions.

Data Analysis: Open coding and content analysis.

Results: Two focus groups, each group having seven patients, were conducted. The major strategies identified were patient education, self-responsibility of patients, family support, reminders and societal support. The key educational needs were dealing with side effects and learning to use insulin properly, and a need for different learning styles when offering education. For the source, the major ones were physicians and pharmacists, having a continuous dialogue about the disease and medicines, and individuality in managing the disease. Respondents also recommended using a peer support group. For the setting, the patients preferred continuity of patient education throughout the disease.

Conclusion: The 3S approach was able to elicit several recommendations from patients to improve their adherence with diabetes medicines. Educational strategies were identified as the foremost approach coming from physicians and pharmacists throughout their disease journey, in addition to peer support.

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024789DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6340632PMC
January 2019
50 Reads
2.063 Impact Factor

Publication Analysis

Top Keywords

diabetes medicines
12
focus group
12
primary outpatient
8
physicians pharmacists
8
patients
8
strategies identified
8
peer support
8
outpatient clinic
8
patients non-adherent
8
patient education
8
preferences addressing
8
addressing non-adherence
8
non-adherent diabetes
8
diabetes
5
non-adherence
5
group
5
key educational
4
major strategies
4
conducted major
4
dealing side
4

References

(Supplied by CrossRef)
Adherence to long-term therapies: evidence for action
Burkhart et al.
J Nurs Scholarsh 2003
Adherence and health care costs
Iuga et al.
Risk Manag Healthc Policy 2014

Similar Publications