Mathematical Modelling of Human African Trypanosomiasis Using Control Measures.

Comput Math Methods Med 2018 22;2018:5293568. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Biriwa, Cape Coast, Ghana.

Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), commonly known as sleeping sickness, is a neglected tropical vector-borne disease caused by trypanosome protozoa. It is transmitted by bites of infected tsetse fly. In this paper, we first present the vector-host model which describes the general transmission dynamics of HAT. In the tsetse fly population, the HAT is modelled by three compartments, while in the human population, the HAT is modelled by four compartments. The next-generation matrix approach is used to derive the basic reproduction number, , and it is also proved that if ≤ 1, the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable, which means the disease dies out. The disease persists in the population if the value of > 1. Furthermore, the optimal control model is determined by using the Pontryagin's maximum principle, with control measures such as education, treatment, and insecticides used to optimize the objective function. The model simulations confirm that the use of the three control measures is very efficient and effective to eliminate HAT in Africa.

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https://www.hindawi.com/journals/cmmm/2018/5293568/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/5293568DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282183PMC

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April 2019
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